Spanish-American Institute

 

 

2011 Course Syllabi

 


Table of Contents

 

200  Keyboarding for Information Processing                               48 Classes  4

201  Keyboarding  (Basic Course)                                           120 Classes  5

202  Keyboarding  (Advanced Course)                      120 Classes  7

203  Keyboarding  (Advanced Course)                      80 Classes  8

205  Machine Transcription                               30 Classes  9

300  Business Management                               120 Classes  10

301  Business Mathematics         24 classes  13

302 Accounting (First Course)                             120 Classes  14

303  Accounting (Intermediate Course)                             120 Classes  17

304  Accounting (Advanced I)                                        60 Classes  19

305  Accounting (Advanced II)                                       60 Classes  21

310 Import-Export Management                       80 Classes  23

401 Office Practice                    160 Classes  25

404 Business Communications                      72 Classes  28

500  English Literacy         120 classes  31

501.1  English as a Second Language I          120 classes  33

501.2  ESL II                      120 Classes  35

501.3  English as a Second Language III (NorthStar: Basic/Low Intermediate)               120 classes  37

501.4  English as a Second Language IV (NorthStar: Intermediate)         120 classes  39

501.5  English as a Second Language V (NorthStar: High Intermediate) 120 Hours  41

501.6  English as a Second Language VI (NorthStar: Advanced)    120 classes  43

502  Business English Communication                   120 Classes  45

503  Advanced Reading and Writing                      120 Hours  47

604  High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation            120 Classes  49

605 Pre-GED Foundation for GED Preparation                              80 hours  51

610  TOEFL Exam Preparation                     80 hours  53

620 College Success                                                             160 classes  55

925 Database Management           80 classes  59

940  Introduction to Microsoft Windows                  80 Classes  61

955  Using the Internet                 80 Classes  63

960 Using Microsoft Access          80 classes  65

965 Using PowerPoint                     80 classes  67

970 Computerized Accounting Using Peachtree                          80 Classes  69

975  Using Adobe Photoshop                            160 classes  71

980  Using Microsoft FrontPage                                                  160 classes  73

985  Using Windows Movie Maker                                               80 classes  75

990 Introduction to the Mac                       80 classes  79

995 Switching to the Mac                      80 classes  81

1000  Using Apple iMovie                                              80 classes  83

 


200  Keyboarding for Information Processing                               48 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  None

Textbooks:  None

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, Keyboarding for Information Processing teaches basic keyboarding for information processing and computer applications.

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

§         to apply rules for English spelling and word formation;

§         to read and understand English letter combinations and words, word combinations, sentences, and passages;

§         to recognize and correct spelling, punctuation, and other English language errors; and

§         to keystroke English text at a minimum of 10 wpm with no more than 5 errors in a 5-minute timed writing.

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package.  Faculty encourage students questions requiring them to use the languages of English and of keyboarding.  Each student creates a portfolio of finished output.

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Tests

75%

Total

100%

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%.

 Course Outline:            

Week

Topics 

Assignments and Tests

1-2

Software introduction.  Orally and visually identifying and keystroking English alphabetical characters. 

Diagnostic and progress tests. 

3

Orally and visually identifying and keyboarding English punctuation and numbers.  Learning left and right shift.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

4

Orally and visually identifying and keyboarding English language symbols. Random English word practice.   Accuracy typing game.                  

Progress tests

5

Random English sentence practice with and without numbers.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

6

Reading, interpreting, and building speed and accuracy building keyboarding English text.  Keyboarding difficult English words.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

7

Alternating fingers; reaches and high-risk combinations.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

 

8

Reading, understanding, and keyboarding English prefixes and suffixes, vowels and consonants, and numbers and symbols.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

9

Reading, interpreting, and building speed and accuracy keyboarding English text.  Accuracy and speed typing games. 

Progress tests

10

Reading, interpreting, and building speed and accuracy keyboarding English text.  Accuracy and speed typing games. 

Progress tests

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 1/10, 3/11


201  Keyboarding  (Basic Course)                                                   120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  None

Textbooks:  None

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, Keyboarding for Information Processing teaches basic keyboarding for information processing and computer applications.

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

§         to apply rules for English spelling and word formation;

§         to read and understand English letter combinations and words, word combinations, sentences, and passages;

§         to recognize and correct spelling, punctuation, and other English language errors; and

§         to keystroke English text at a minimum of 25 wpm with no more than 5 errors in a 5-minute timed writing.

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes include language development and theory sessions followed by hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy keyboarding in English using Word.  Students completes periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date.  Each student creates a portfolio of finished output.

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Progress tests and Post-tests

25%

Document Production

25%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:

Week

Topics 

Assignments and Tests

The program is computer adaptive.  Students move through lessons based on skill levels.  The lessons and skill level adjusts as they improve.  Computerized progress tests measure skill levels.  Progress tests during school bi-monthly exams used to measure course objectives. 

Week 8

  Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 15 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 16

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 20 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 24

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 20 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes

 

 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 3/11

 


202  Keyboarding  (Advanced Course)                                             120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Keyboarding 201 or equivalent.

Textbooks:  None. 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this course builds keyboarding speed and accuracy skills through production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft hand-written and print copy sources in English. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Progress tests and Post-tests

25%

Document Production

25%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:

Week

Topics 

Assignments and Tests

The program is computer adaptive.  Students move through lessons based on skill levels.  The lessons and skill level adjusts as they improve.  Computerized progress tests measure skill levels.  Progress tests during school bi-monthly exams used to measure course objectives. 

Week 8

  Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 15 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 16

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 20 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 24

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 25 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes

 

 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10


203  Keyboarding  (Advanced Course)                                                 80 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Keyboarding 202 or equivalent.

Textbooks:  None. 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this course builds keyboarding speed and accuracy skills through production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft hand-written and print copy sources in English. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Progress tests and Post-tests

25%

Document Production

25%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:

Week

Topics 

Assignments and Tests

The program is computer adaptive.  Students move through lessons based on skill levels.  The lessons and skill level adjusts as they improve.  Computerized progress tests measure skill levels.  Progress tests during school bi-monthly exams used to measure course objectives. 

Week 8

  Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 35 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 16

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 45 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

 

rev.2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 3/11


205  Machine Transcription                                                     30 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Keyboarding 201 or equivalent

Textbook:  None

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this course teaches students to listen, to understand, and to transcribe English word/thought groups through simulated workplace tasks and materials.

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

 

Instructional Methods: Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing dictation and transcription lessons or a comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package.  Classes include language development and theory sessions followed by hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy. 

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:         

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Transcription principles and practice from printed text

Transcription Exercises 1-5

2

Transcription from print (cont.)

Transcription Exercises 6-11

3

Dictation principles and practice

Dictation Lessons 1-3

4

Dictation practice

Dictation Lessons 4-6

5

Dictation practice

Dictation Lessons 7-8

6

Dictation practice

Dictation Lessons 9-10

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11

 


300  Business Management                                                      120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  None

Textbooks:  W.L. Megginson et al, Small Business Management:  An Entrepreneur's Guidebook, 4th edition, Irwin McGraw-Hill, 2002 (or comparable text). 

 

Course Description: While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to small business management.  Through reading, discussion, and case study analysis, students develop an understanding of small business planning, of marketing and operational strategy development, of legal and financial issues, and of day-to-day supervision and control procedures. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

 

Instructional Methods:  Students will read, discuss, and write in English in response to

situations described in the text; in reponse to quotations, charts, tables, and pictures; and in response to "cases."

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

30%

Quizzes

10%

Project

10%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

a.) Using the text:  parts of the book and learning aids.

b.) Introduction to small business issues and trends.

 

Read chapter 1.

Select one chapter chart and one "question for discussion" write at least a paragraph explaining each.

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

3

Opportunities and challenges in small business:  reasons people start small business, characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, opportunities for small businesses, and concerns of small business owners. 

Read chapter 2.. 

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph for each.

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

4

Forms of ownership:  proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and others; selecting and evaluating the right legal form.

Individual oral presentation within small group in response to a specific chapter case. 

Read chapter 3. 

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Select and write at least a paragraph in response. 

Work with a small group to prepare a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

5

Becoming a small business owner:  identifying a needed product and a market for it; franchising. 

Read chapter 4.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

6-7

Planning in organizing and managing a small business:  strategic, operational, and financial planning; components of a business plan; writing, presenting, and implementing the plan; writing a resume. 

Brief individual oral presentations explaining a chapter visual or figure. 

Read chapter 5.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each. 

Select one component of the sample business plan and explain why it is important.

Using the models in the sample business plan, write a resume for yourself. 

Open book test on material covered so far.  

8

Financing your business:  various forms and sources of financing; presenting yourself to lenders. 

Review for exam. 

Read chapter 6.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

 

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

Exam. 

9

Marketing strategies:  marketing concepts; using research; packaging, pricing, and other aspects of marketing; implementing and evaluating a marketing strategy. 

Individual within small group oral presentations in response to a specific chapter case

Read chapter 7.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Work with a small group to prepare a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

10

Promoting and distributing a product:  choosing a distribution channel; advertising, merchandizing, and promoting the product; managing credit. 

Read chapter 8.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

11

Human resources:  recruiting, selecting, training, and developing employees; complying with Equal Employment Opportunity laws and regulations; compensating employees and providing benefits; protecting their health and safety. 

Individual within small group oral presentations in response to a specific chapter case

Read chapter 9.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Work with a small group to prepare a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

12

Maintaining good employee relationships:  defining an organizational structure; exercising effective leadership; communicating with and motivating employees; evaluating employee's performance; imposing structure and discipline; terminating employees. 

Read chapter 10

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

 

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

13

Locating and laying out facilities:  developing operating systems; locating facilities; planning the physical facility; improving operations. 

 

Read chapter 11

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Prepare your part of a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the chapter cases.

14

Purchasing, inventory, and quality control:  selecting suppliers and establishing purchasing procedures; controlling inventory; assuring quality control. 

Individual within small group oral presentations in response to a specific chapter case

Read chapter 12

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Continue to work on small group presentation. 

15

Planning for profit:  business financial structure; profit-making activities; planning for profitability. 

Read chapter 13

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

16

Budgeting and taxes:  controlling operations and using budgetary control; evaluating financial conditions; local, state, and federal taxes; employment and personal owner taxes; record keeping for tax purposes.

Review for exam.  

Read chapter 14

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Work with a small group to prepare a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter

Exam. 

17

Information technology:  role of information in small business; creating appropriate management information systems; using information technology to promote your business.  

Read chapter 15

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

18

Risk management, insurance, and crime prevention:  types of risk, minimizing loss with insurance, and preventing crime; safeguarding employees. 

Read chapter 16

Select one chapter visual or figure and write at least a paragraph explaining it.

Select one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph in response. 

Work with a small group on a small group oral presentation about one of the cases at the end of the chapter

19-20

Business-government relations and business ethics:  basic laws affecting small business; government help for small business; government regulations and paperwork; social and ethically responsible behavior. 

Read chapter 17

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

21

Planning for the future:  preparing the next generation and preparing for management succession; tax and estate planning. 

Read chapter 18

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Work with a small group on a small group oral presentation about one of the cases at the end of the chapter

22-23

Individual Project:  Developing a successful business plan. 

Read "Workbook for Developing a Successful Business Plan"

Follow instructor guidelines for developing an individual business plan for written and oral presentation next week. 

24

Individual project oral reports. 

Review for exam. 

Individual oral and written reports summarizing business plan.

Final exam. 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 3/11

 


301  Business Mathematics                                          24 classes

Prerequisite(s):  None

Textbooks:  Business Mathematics:  The Easy Way, by Calman Goozner.  Barron’s Educational Services, Inc., 2000, or comparable text. 

 

Course Description: While developing English language skills, this course teaches elementary business math concepts and applications.

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

Instructional Methods:  Students will read and discuss English language descriptions of problems requiring mathematical solutions and will respond arithmetically to word problems in English.  Students will also be asked to talk and write about how they solved a problem. 

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Addition and subtraction in business

Assigned exercises

2

Multiplication and division in business

Assigned exercises

3

Fractions and percents

Assigned exercises

4

Banking , loan, and credit applications

Assigned exercises

5

Retailing and purchasing applications

Assigned exercises.

Review and exam.

 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 2/08, 4/10, 4/11

 

 


302 Accounting (First Course)                                                          120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  None

Textbooks:  Kermit D. Larson et al, Volume I:  Fundamental Accounting Principles With Working Papers, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2002 (or comparable text)

 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this first course in an accounting sequence introduces students to the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes include reading for detail, oral discussion, oral practice with numbers, instructor and student explanations of basic accounting principles and procedures, and problem solving through analytical and procedural exercises within real-world business and financial contexts.  

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Mapping the text: the text and its help features

Accounting in the information age. 

Forms of organizations: business and non-business.

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Chart interpretation:  Exhibits 1.1. and 1.2. 

Reading:  chapter learning objectives; chapter preview; pp. 1-9.

Questions: QS 1-1 to 1-3.  Answer questions in one or more complete sentences, following the guidelines provided by the instructor. 

2

Financial activities in organizations. 

Financial statements:  balance sheets, income statements, statement of changes in owner's equity, statement of cash flows

Reading for detail to understand word problems.

Oral practice:  reading aloud and discussing statements with numbers and functions (exhibits 1.8 to 1.11)

Reading:  assigned.

Questions: QS1-3 and 1-8. 

Exercises: 1-1 to 1-3, as assigned. (Where exercises require a written response, answer in complete sentences with answers that explain why the answer is correct.)

Problem Set: 1-1A.  

3

Ethics and social responsibility.

Career opportunities: accounting specializations and accounting-related opportunities

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Oral practice: oral discussion involving numbers and functions (exhibit 1.17)

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Reading: assigned

Questions:  QS 1-9 and 1-10

Exercises: 1-9 to 1-11.

Problem Set: 1-1B to 1-3B

4

Financial statements:  communicating with financial statements; generally accepted accounting principles; introduction to the accounting equation

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 36-46

Question:  QS 2-1 

Exercises:  2-1 to 2-2

Problem Set: 2-1A

5

Business transactions:  transactions and the accounting equation

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Oral practice: oral discussion involving numbers and functions

Oral chart interpretation. 

Reading:  pp. 46-51

Question:  QS2-4 

Exercises 2-3 to 2-5

Problem Set:  2-2A to 2-3A

6

Financial statements:  income statements, changes in owner's equity, balance sheets, cash flow statements

Reading for detail to understand word problems.

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems.   

Oral interpretation of charts, graphs, and tables. 

Reading:  pp. 52-57

Questions: QS 2-5

Exercises:  2-6A to 2-9A

Problem Set: 2-4A to 2-6A

7

Analyzing transactions:  transactions and documents, accounts and double entry accounting

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Oral practice: discussion about numbers and functions

Reading:  pp. 78-87

Questions:  QS3-1 to 3-2

Exercises:  3-1 to 3-2

8

Individual oral presentation of how to compute the balance for a T-Account. 

Review for exam.

 

Review exercises, as assigned.

Write a paragraph or more in which you explain how to compute the balance for the T-Account in exhibit 3.6. 

Bi-monthly exam

9

Processing transactions:  journalizing transactions, balance column accounts, and posting journal entries

Reading for detail to understand word problems.

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems.  

Oral chart, graph, and table interpretation. 

Reading:  pp. 88-96

Questions:  QS3-4

Exercises:  3-2 to 3-8 (as assigned)

10

Trial balance:  preparing, using, correcting, and presenting trial balances

Reading for detail to understand word problems.

Oral practice:  reading aloud and discussing statements with numbers and functions.  

Reading:  pp. 97-102

Questions:  QS3-5 to 3-6

Exercises:  3-9 to 3-12 (as assigned)

Problem Set: 3A (as assigned)

11

Accrual accounting:  timing and reporting, adjusting, recognizing revenues and expenses; accrual vs. cash flow basis

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 124-129

Questions:  QS4-1 to 4-3

Exercises: 4-1 to 4-3

Problem Set: 4-1A

12

Adjusting accounts: adjusting for expenses, depreciation, unearned revenue, etc.

Reading for detail to understand word problems.

Small group work:  providing the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems.   

Reading:  pp. 129-139

Questions: QS4-4 to 4-7

Exercises:  4-4 to 4-7

Problem Set: 4-2A

13

Preparing financial statements.  Reading for detail to understand word problems

Oral chart, graph, and table interpretation.   

Reading:  pp. 140-144

Questions: QS4-8 to 4-12

Exercises:  4-8 to 4-9

Problem Set: 4-3A

14

Completing the accounting cycle:  the closing process for temporary and permanent accounts, recording closing entries, and post-closing trial balance

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 168-174

Questions:  QS5-1 to 5-4

Exercises:  5-1 to 5-7

Problem Set:  5-1A to 5-3A

15

Using the work sheet as a tool:  stating cash flows and reviewing the accounting cycle

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 174-181

Questions:  QS5-5 to 5-6

Exercises:  5-8 to 5-11

Problem Set:  5-4A

16

Review for exam

In writing, explain what someone looking at the statement of cash flows in exhibit 5.11 can tell about the financial situation of the company. 

Bi-monthly exam

17

Classified balance sheets:  classification structure and categories

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Oral chart, graph, and table interpretation. 

T:  pp. 182-188

Questions:  QS5-7

Exercises:  5-12

Problem Set: 6-1 A

18

Accounting for merchandising:  merchandising activities and merchandise purchases, including discounts, returns, allowances, etc. 

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 212-222

Questions:  QS6-1 to 6-2

Exercises:  6-1 to 6-5

Problem Set:  6-3 A

19

Merchandise sales and other merchandise issues:  sales transactions, discounts, returns, allowances, cost and price adjustments, cost flows, etc.

Reading for detail to understand word problems.

Oral chart, table, and graph interpretation.    

Reading:  pp. 223-229

Questions:  QS6-4 to 6-8

Exercises:  6-7 to 6-14

Problem Set: as assigned

20

Income statement formats:  multiple-step and single-step income statements, merchandising cash flows

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 230-237

Questions:  QS

Exercises:  assigned

Problem Set:  6-4 to 6-5A

21

Merchandise inventories:  assigning costs to inventory and inventory analysis and effects

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 260-269

Questions:  QS7-1 to 7-6

Exercises:  7-1 to 7-3

Problem Set:  7-1A

22

Inventory items and costs

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 270-272

Questions:  QS7-7 to 7-8

Exercises:  7-4 & 7-7 to 7-8

Problem Set:  7-2 A

23

Other inventory valuations

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 273-283

Questions:  QS7-9 to 7-10

Exercises:  7-9 to 7-12

Problem Set:  7-3 to 7-7A to

24

Putting it all together:  comparative analysis of two companies, ethics challenge, and entrepreneurial decision making

Reading for detail to understand word problems. 

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Review for exam. 

Comparative analysis A1, p. 298

Ethics challenge A 1, p. 298

Entrepreneurial decision BTN 7-8, p. 289

Bi-monthly exam

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10


303  Accounting (Intermediate Course)                                            120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Accounting 302 or equivalent

Textbooks:  Kermit D. Larson et al, Volume I:  Fundamental Accounting Principles With Working Papers, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2002 (or comparable text). 

 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this second course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes include reading for detail, oral discussion and presentations, instructor and student explanations of accounting principles and procedures, and problem solving through analytical and procedural exercises within real-world business and financial contexts.  

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-4

Accounting information systems: 

Oral practice:  explaining what the cash receipts journal in exhibit 8.7 communicates.

Close reading of selected text. 

Oral practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps you used to solve it. 

Discussion of responses to ethics challenge. 

Reading:  pp. 300-324.

Questions: QS 8-1 to 8-6.  Answer questions in one or more complete sentences. 

Exercises:  8-1 to 8-14, as assigned.

Problem Set:  as assigned. 

Explain in writing one of the problems in 8-1 to 8-14 and the steps used to solve it. 

Ethics challenge, p. 348:  Write a paragraph or more in response

5-8

Cash and internal control:  internal control, control of cash, and banking activities as controls. 

Oral practice:  explaining what the bank statements in various chapter exhibits communicate.

Oral practice:  explaining Reebok's balance sheet analysis based on responses to question 10.

Oral practice: describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps used to solve it. 

Oral practice:  discussion of Ethics Challenge, p. 391.  

Close reading of selected text.  

Review for exam, week 8. 

Reading:  pp. 352-378.

Questions: QS 9-1 to 9-7.

Exercises:  as assigned

Problem Set: as assigned

Explain in writing one of the problems in 8-1 to 8-14 and the steps used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to question 10 on p. 381.  Be specific.

Bi-monthly exam, week 8. 

9-12

Receivables and short-term investments. 

Oral practice:  explaining the graph in exhibit 10.1 and the chart in "'Did You Know?" p. 412.

Oral practice:  responses to question 11, 12, or 13. 

Oral practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and its solution. 

Oral practice:  discussion of "Communicating in Practice" and "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 434-435. 

Close reading of selected text.  

Reading:  pp. 394-420.

Questions:  QS 10-1 to 10-8.

Exercises and Problem Set: as assigned.

Write a paragraph or more in response to question 11, 12, or 13, p. 423.  Be specific.

Explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to the "Entrepreneurial Decision" case on pp. 434-435

13-16

Plant assists, natural resources, and intangibles:  cost of plant assets, depreciation, revenue and capital expenditures, and disposals; etc.

Oral practice:  explaining exhibit 11.1 and 11.17 graphs and what exhibit accounting statements communicate. 

Oral practice:  responding to quick study questions 11-1 to 11-12.

Oral practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises with demonstrating  the steps used to solve it. 

Oral practice:  discussion of "Ethics Challenge" and "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems, pp. 477 and 478. 

Close reading of selected text.

Review for exam, week 16.  

Reading:  pp. 436-463.

Question:  QS 11-1 to 11-12. 

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to either the "Ethics Challenge" or the "Entrepreneurial Decision" problem on pp. 477 and 478

Bi-monthly exam, week 16.   

 

17-20

Current liabilities:  liabilities characteristics, known/determinable liabilities, estimated liabilities, contingent liabilities, and long-term liabilities.

Oral practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and the steps used to solve it. 

Oral practice:  discussion of "Ethics Challenge" and "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 523 and 524. 

Close reading of selected text. 

Reading:  pp. 480-508.

Question:  QS 12-1 to 12-11.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned.

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to either the "Ethics Challenge" or the "Entrepreneurial Decision" problem on pp. 523 and 524

21-24

Partnerships:  forms of business organization and partnership form; basic partnership accounting, admission and withdrawal of partners, partnership liquidation. 

Oral practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrating the steps used to solve it. 

Oral practice:  discussion of "Ethics Challenge" and "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 523 and 525. 

Close reading of selected text.

Review for exam., week 24. 

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 526-543. 

Questions: QS 13-1 to 13-7

Exercises:  as assigned.

Problem Set:  as assigned

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to either the "Ethics Challenge" or the "Entrepreneurial Decision" problem on pp. 523 and 525

Bi-monthly exam, week 24.

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11


304  Accounting (Advanced I)                                                            60 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Accounting 303 or equivalent

Textbooks:  Kermit D. Larson et al, Volume II:  Fundamental Accounting Principles With Working Papers, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2002 (or comparable text). 

 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this third course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes will include reading for detail, oral discussion and presentations, instructor and student explanations of accounting principles and procedures, and problem solving through analytical and procedural exercises within real-world business and financial contexts.  

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

Equity transactions and corporate reporting:  corporate form of organization; common and preferred stock; dividends; treasury stock; reporting income information; retained earnings, 

Close reading of selected text. 

Oral practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrating the steps you used to solve it. 

Discussion of responses to ethics challenge.

Close reading of selected text.   

Reading:  pp. 556-590. 

Questions: QS 14-1 to 14-6.  Answer questions in one or more complete sentences. 

Exercises:  as assigned. Where exercises require a written response, answer in complete sentences with answers that explain why the answer is correct. 

Problem Set:  as assigned. 

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in the exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

3-4

Long-term liabilities:  bond basics, bond issuances, bond retirement, long-term notes payable.  

Oral practice:  describing how you would handle the ethics challenge on p. 611 or the entrepreneurial decision problem on p. 612. 

Close reading of selected text. 

Quiz.  

. 

Reading:  pp. 614-646.

Questions: QS 15-1 to 15-14.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

Ethics challenge, p. 348, or entrepreneurial decision problem on p, 612:  Write a paragraph or more in response, using the questions as a guide. 

Quiz. 

5-6

Long-term investments and international transactions:  classifying investments, long-term investments in securities, investments in international operations, comprehensive income. 

Oral practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrating the steps used to solve it. 

Oral practice:  discussion of question 14 or 15. 

Close reading of selected text. 

Reading:  pp. 660-676.

Questions:  QS 16-1 to 16-10.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned.

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in 16-1 to 16-10 and describe the steps you used to solve it

 

7-8

Reporting and analyzing cash flows:  basics of cash flow reporting; cash flows from operating, from investing, and from financing. 

Oral practice:  interpreting and explaining cash flow statements in chapter exhibits. 

Oral practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation of discussion of "Ethics Challenge" or  "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 738 or 739. 

Close reading of selected text.

 Review for exam, week 8.

Reading:  pp. 690-723.

Question:  QS 17-1 to 17-12. 

Exercises and Problem Set: as assigned

Respond to either the "Ethics Challenge" or the "Entrepreneurial Decision" problem on pp. 738 or 739, using the questions as a guide.  

Bi-monthly exam, week 8. 

 

9-10

Analysis of financial statements:  basics of analysis; horizontal, vertical, and ratio analysis. 

Oral practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrating the steps used to solve it. 

Close reading of selected text. 

Reading:  pp. 740-767

Question:  QS 18-1 to 18-6.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

11

 Managerial accounting concepts and principles:  cost accounting concepts; reporting manufacturing activities. 

Close reading of selected text. 

Reading:  pp. 784-807. 

Questions, Exercises, and Problem Set: as assigned.

 

12

Job order cost accounting:  inventory system and cost accounting, job order cost accounting, adjusting over applied and under applied, overhead. 

Review for exam

Reading:  pp. 826-844. 

Questions, Exercises, and Problem Set:  as assigned

Exam.

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11


305  Accounting (Advanced II)                                                         60 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Accounting 304 or equivalent

Textbooks:  Kermit D. Larson et al, Volume II:  Fundamental Accounting Principles With Working Papers, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2002 (or comparable text)

 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this fourth course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

 

Instructional Methods:  Classes will include reading for detail, oral discussion and presentations, instructor and student explanations of accounting principles and procedures, and problem solving through analytical and procedural exercises within real-world business and financial contexts.  

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:         

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

Review of cost accounting.

Process cost accounting:  comparing job order and process operations; process cost accounting, equivalent units of production, transfers in finished goods inventory and cost of goods sold.

Oral practice:  prepare a brief oral presentation in which you describe one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps you used to solve it. 

Discussion of responses to ethics challenge.

Close reading of selected text.   

Vocabulary log. 

Reading:  pp. 864-889. 

Questions: QS 21.  Answer questions in one or more complete sentences. 

Exercises:  as assigned. Where exercises require a written response, answer in complete sentences with answers that explain why the answer is correct. 

Problem Set:  as assigned. 

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems from the exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

 

3-4

Cost allocation and performance measurement:  overhead coast allocation methods; departmental accounting and departmental expense allocations; responsibility accounting.

Oral practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation in which you describe how you would handle the ethics challenge on p. 943-44 or the entrepreneurial decision problem on p.945. 

Close reading of selected text.  

Quiz. 

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 614-646.

Questions: QS 22.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

Ethics challenge, p. 943-44, or entrepreneurial decision problem on p, 945:  Write a paragraph or more in response, using the questions as a guide. 

Quiz. 

5-6

Cost-volume-profit analysis:  identifying and measuring cost behavior, break-even analysis, applying cost-volume-profit analysis. 

Oral practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation in which you describe one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps you used to solve it. 

Oral practice:  discussion of question 14 or 15. 

Close reading of selected text.

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 946-964.

Questions:  QS 23.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned.

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it

 

7-8

Master budgets and planning:  budgeting process and administration, master budget.

Oral practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation of discussion of "Ethics Challenge" or  "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 1014 or 1015. 

Close reading of selected text.

Review for test

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 980-1001.

Question:  QS 24. 

Exercises and Problem Set: as assigned

Ethics challenge, p. 1014, or entrepreneurial decision problem on p, 1015:  Write a paragraph or more in response, using the questions as a guide.

Test.

9-10

Flexible budgets and standard costs:  budgetary process, flexible budget reports, material and labor standards, cost variances, overhead standards and variances, extending standard costs.

Oral practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation in which you describe one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps you used to solve it. 

Close reading of selected text. 

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 1016-

Question:  QS 25.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

11-12

Capital budgeting and managerial decisions:  methods using and not using time value of money; decisions and information, managerial decision tasks.

Oral practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation of discussion of "Ethics Challenge" or  "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 1098 or 1099. 

Close reading of selected text.

Review for test

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 1060-1083. 

Questions: QS 26.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

Ethics challenge, p. 1098, or entrepreneurial decision problem on p, 1099:  Write a paragraph or more in response, using the questions as a guide

Test.

rev. 2/04, 4/10


 

310 Import-Export Management                                               80 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  None

Textbooks:  Building an Import-Export Business, 3rd ed., Kenneth D. Weiss, Wiley Publishers, 2002 (or comparable text).  U.S. Customs Service, Importing Into The United States:  A Guide for Commercial Importers, US Customs and Border Protection Publication, 2005 (or comparable text). 

 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this course provides an introduction to global markets, to the major trading nations and trading blocs, and to the processes and procedures that govern import and export management. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

Instructional Methods: Classes cover both theory and examples drawn from the business world.  Students apply the principles of effective import-export management explained in the text to simulated situations. Students also develop a business plan for an import-export company.  

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Weeks

Topics

Assignments

1-3

Importing scenarios

Selected chapter 1 readings; selected US Customs publication readings; handout readings

Imagine an importing scenario from the US in your home country and describe some of the local and US customs regulations that you must observe. 

4-6

Exporting  scenarios

Selected chapter 1 readings; selected US Customs publication readings; handout readings

Imagine an exporting scenario from your home country to the US and describe some of the local and US customs regulations that you must observe. 

7

Developing contact with buyers and sellers

Selected chapter 2 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

8

Understanding the local and global money market

Review for exam

Selected chapter 2 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

Bi-monthly exam

9

Understanding local culture and language

Selected chapter 2 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

Describe a feature of your home-country culture that importers need to consider. 

10

Setting up an import-export business:  forms of organization and trademarks and logos

Selected chapter 3 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

Begin word on a business plan for setting up an import-export company per instructor guidelines.

11

Setting up an import-export business:  opening bank accounts

Selected chapter 3 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

Write a memo to your instructor describing the import-export business for which you are developing a business plan.

12

Setting up an import-export business:  establishing an office

Selected chapter 3 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

First draft of business plan due with scope, organization, bank information, and office setup. 

13

Setting up an import-export business:  accounting practices

Selected chapter 3 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography readings

 

14

Setting up an import-export business:  taxation

Selected chapter 3 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

Second draft of business plan due to include the first draft elements plus description of accounting functions and tax consideration

15

Setting up an import-export business:  obtaining financing

Selected chapter 3 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

 

16

Setting up an import-export business:  promotion and advertising

Review for exam

Selected chapter 3 readings; handout and/or assigned readings from bibliography

Third and final draft of business plan due to include financing and promotion/advertising. 

Bi-monthly exam

 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11


401 Office Practice                                       160 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Keyboarding (Basic Course) or the equivalent

Textbooks:  Patsy Fulton-Calkins, Procedures for the Office Professional, South-Western Educational Publishing, 2000 (or comparable text). 

 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to the issues and trends affecting the 21st Century office professional, including job searching, information processing, effective communication, records management, and team building. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

Instructional Methods:  Students will read, discuss, and write in English in response to:

situations described in the text; in reponse to charts, tables, and pictures; and in response to "cases."

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

Today's changing workplace. 

Close reading of a case. 

Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions.

Read:  pp. 1-26.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—pp. 25-26, using complete sentences for all answers.   

  Office Applications—Either OA1-3 or OA1-5.  

3

The Office team and environment

Close reading of a case. 

Individual oral presentations about approaches to critical thinking problem. 

Read:  pp. 29-52.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 52, using complete sentences for all answers.   

  Office Applications—Chose either O2-2 or O2-3.   

4-5

Office productivity:  stress and the office professional; time management, including techniques and systems.

Close reading of a case.  Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions.

Read:  pp. 53-81.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 80, using complete sentences for all answers.  

  Office Applications—time log activity, following instructor's guidelines.   

6-7

Ethical behavior: 

Close reading of a case.

Individual oral presentations about approaches to critical thinking problem

Read:  pp. 84-105.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 105, using complete sentences for all answers. 

  Office Applications—choose one of the cases in OA4-3 and come to class prepare to make a brief oral presentation describing the case and answering the questions that follow it

8-9

Information processing: 

Close reading of a case.  Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions. 

Review for exam, week 8. 

Read pp. 113-114, 117, 135-137, 139.

OA5-1

Bi-monthly exam, week 8.

10

Computer software:  Close reading of a case.

Individual oral presentations about approaches to critical thinking problem

Read pp. 142-143,152-159, 161, 163-166. 

Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 165, questions 2-4, using complete sentences for all answers.   

11

Reprographics: 

Close reading of a case. 

Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions

Read pp. 168-169, 172-178, 182-184, & 189-191.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 192, questions 1&3, using complete sentences for all answers.   

   Office Applications—OA7-3, summarize the situation and answer one of the questions that follow the problem

12

The virtual office: 

Close reading of a case. 

Individual oral presentations about approaches to critical thinking problem

 

Read pp. 195-196, 198-205, 215-218.

Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 192, questions 1,2, &4, using complete sentences for all answers.   

   Office Applications—Describe one of the cartoons in the chapter and explain how it illustrates an issue related to the virtual office and/or virtual office professional

13-14

The communication process: 

Close reading of a case.  Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more for each question

Read pp. 222-240.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 240, questions 2-4, using complete sentences for all answers.   

15-16

Written communication:  Close reading of a case. 

Review for exam, week 16.

Read pp. 242-266.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 266, using complete sentences for all answers. 

Bi-monthly exam, week 16.

17-18

Presentations:  .

Close reading of a case. 

Individual/group oral presentations.

Critical Thinking and Office Applications—present a brief oral report with one other person of the critical thinking activity on p. 291.  One person will summarize the report for the class; the other will present suggestions for improvement. 

Read pp. 269-291.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—answer all questions, using complete sentences for all answers. 

 

19-20

Telecommunication skills: 

Close reading of a case.

 Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions

 Office Applications—Work in groups of three to perform the skit in OA12-4.  One person each reads the commentary, Gloria’s part, and Mr. Silva’s part and will also answer one of the three questions at the end. 

Read pp. 294-324.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 324 questions using complete sentences for all answers.   

 

21

Office MailClose reading of a case. 

Individual oral presentations about approaches to critical thinking problem

Read pp. pp. 328-352.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 352, questions 3&4, using complete sentences for all answers. 

    Office Applications—OA13-2

22-23

Records management rules and procedures: 

Close reading of a case. 

Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions

Read pp. 358-391.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 391 questions using complete sentences for all answers. 

 

24

Records management technology

Close reading of a case.  Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions

Review for exam.

Read pp. 394-395, 410 (record migration)-414. 

Bi-monthly exam, week 24.

25

Meetings and conferences: 

Close reading of a case. 

Individual oral presentations about approaches to critical thinking problem

Critical Thinking—Summarize the situation on p. 452 and write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions

Read pp. 420-421,427-431,434-443, 448-452.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 451, question 4, using complete sentences for all answers. 

 

26-27

Travel arrangements: 

Close reading of a case.  Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more that answers one of the questions

Read pp. 454-479.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 478, questions 2-5, using complete sentences for all answers.   

   Office Applications—OA 17-2

28-29

Financial documents:  Close reading of a case. 

Critical Thinking—Write a paragraph or more in response to each of the three questions.   Individual oral presentations about approaches to critical thinking problem. 

Read pp. 482-509 (top).  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p. 508, questions 2-5, using complete sentences for all answers. 

 

30-32

Employment and advancement: 

Close reading of a case.   Critical Thinking—Work with a partner.  Write a dialogue for the situation described on p. 552 for class. (One half of the class will write dialogue for the situation as described and the other half for a situation in which Emily performs better.)

Review for exam, week 32. 

Read pp. 514-552.  Activities:

  Office Procedures—p.551, using complete sentences for all answers. 

 

  Office Applications—

  1. Write a resume. 
  2. Write an application letter for a job listed in the newspaper or some other source.
  3. Prepare a brief oral presentation describing personal career goals and the steps needed to reach these goals. 

Bi-monthly exam, week 32. 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11


404 Business Communications                                         72 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  None

Textbooks:  Laurie G. Kirszner et al, Writing First With Readings:  Practice in Context, Bedford St. Martin's, 2006 (or comparable text). 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this course emphasizes the application of correct grammar and punctuation to letters, memos, reports, and other forms of personal and business communication.  

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

 

 

Instructional Methods:  Students review English grammar and usage and apply what they have learned to recognizing and editing common errors in paragraph and longer passages that require understanding of context and meaning as well as of correctness.  Students also compose short documents based on models. 

 

Grading:  The final grade will be based on an average of grades for class participation, assignments, and tests.  Students create a learning portfolio that includes assignment and test results.   

Course Outline: Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Contents: 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Exploring the text, including learning aids.

Run-ons and comma splices.

 

Read Unit 21 directions for recognizing run-ons and comma splices.

Complete all Unit practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.  

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question. 

2

Sentence fragments.

Writing business letters.

Read Unit 22 directions for recognizing sentence fragments.

Complete unit practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.  

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question. 

Write a business letter in response to an assigned topic.

3

Subject-verb agreement.

Writing memos.

Read Unit 23 directions for recognizing correct and incorrect subject-verb agreement

Complete unit practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.     

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Write a memo in response to an assigned topic.

4

Illogical shifts.

Writing resumes.

Read Unit 24 directions for recognizing run-ons and comma splices..

Complete practice exercises 24-1 to 24-4, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Develop a current resume, as assigned.

5

Dangling and misplaced modifiers.

Writing job application cover letters.

Read Unit 25 directions for recognizing dangling and misplaced modifiers.

Complete unit practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice.  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Copy and correct the entire passage.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Write a job application cover letter, in response to an actual ad.  Attach the ad to your cover letter.

6

Verbs:  past tense.

Career planning self-assessment memo.  

 

 

Read Unit 26 directions for recognizing past tense correct use.

Complete unit practice, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Write a career-planning memo in which you describe your career goals, what you need to reach them, and your plans for the next five years to work towards those goals. 

.

7

Verbs:  past participles.

Complaint letters.

Read Unit 27 directions for recognizing past participles and their correct use.

Complete practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Draft a complaint letter for your boss on an assigned topic.

8

Nouns and pronouns.

Review for exam. 

Read Unit 28 directions for recognizing nouns and pronouns and their correct use.

Complete practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Bi-monthly exam. 

9

Adjectives and adverbs.

“Bad news” letters.

Read Unit 29 directions for recognizing adjectives and adverbs and their correct use.

Complete practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Draft a “bad news” letter for your boss to job candidates who did not get the job.

10

Grammar and usage issues for ESL writers.

Letters of recommendation.

 

Read Unit 30 directions for recognizing common grammar and usage issues for ESL writers.

Complete practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Write a letter of recommendation for someone with good credentials.

11

Using commas.

Letters of recommendation.

Read Unit 31 directions for recognizing correct and incorrect comma use.

Complete practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Write a letter of recommendation for someone with weak credentials.

12

Using apostrophes.

Summarizing survey results.

Read Unit 32 directions for recognizing correct use of apostrophes.

Complete practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Write a memo in which you summarize the results of the survey described on the handout.

13

Understanding other writing mechanics (e.g., capitalizing proper nouns, punctuating direct quotations, using minor punctuation marks, etc.)

Writing self-assessment writing evaluation memo.

Read Unit 33 directions for recognizing correct writing mechanics.

Complete practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question.

Write a memo in the assigned format in which you summarize your writing strengths and weaknesses and the steps you plan to take to improve.

14

Understanding spelling.

Summary memos or reports.

 

Read Unit 34 directions for recognizing common spelling errors.

Complete practice exercises, copying the entire passages and inserting correct answers where needed.

Unit editing  practice:  Rewrite the entire passage correctly.

Write an original paragraph or more in response to the unit’s  "writing first" question

Write a memo or short report to your instructor summarizing an assigned reading

15

Review for exam 

Exam

 

rev/ 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11


500  English Literacy                                          120 classes              

Prerequisite(s):  None. 

 

Textbook: Longman ESL Literacy, Yvonne Wong Nishio, Pearson Longman, 2006 or comparable text. 

 

Course Description:  A basic introduction to English for students who have had little or no prior school experience or who come from a primary language background using a non-Roman alphabet and need to learn Roman script. 

 

Objectives:  To provide the fundamental literacy skills and basic communicative competence in English needed to successfully continue ESL instruction and/or to participate successfully in the workplace and community.  By the end of the course, students should have developed basic receptive skills for listening and reading English with Roman script and productive skills for speaking and writing English with Roman script. 

 

Instructional Methods:  Daily classes encourage application of newly-learned skills to everyday situations through conversation, reading, and writing.  Language elements are introduced, used, and reused in different written, oral, and aural situations within contexts drawn from daily life.  Instruction will be supplemented with companion ESL video and music recordings keyed to textbook units.   

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Weeks

Topics

Assignments and Tests

 

1-2

Unit 1:  The Alphabet—recognize and say the letters of the alphabet, print capital and small letters, write first and last names, ask and answer questions about names, follow simple classroom instructions, the simple present of “to be,” possessive “’s,” questions with “what?.” 

Unit 1 exercises

 

3-4

Unit 2:  Numbers—read, say, and write numbers “0” through “9,” ask for and give personal information, ask for and give information about phone numbers and addresses, fill out a simple form, initiate and respond to greetings, questions with “what?” and “do you?,” short answers “Yes, I do” or “No, I don’t.”

Unit 2 exercises.

 

 

5-6

Unit 3:  School—identify common classroom objects, identify and ask for the location of important school places, give information about the class and school, questions with “what/when/where?.”

Unit 3 exercises.

 

7-8

 

Unit 4:  Time—tell time, ask for and give information about time, initiate and respond to greetings and leave-taking, identify and name common places in the community or neighborhood, read/say/write numbers “1-100,” simple present affirmative statements, questions with “when/what time?.”

Review prior material for bi-monthly test. 
Prior unit review exercises.

Unit 4 exercises.

Week 8 bi-monthly exam. 

 

9-10

Complete Unit 4:  Time. 

Unit 5:  The Calendar—recognize/say/write the days of the week and months of the year (including abbreviations), say and give the date for today/yesterday/tomorrow, say and write one’s date and place of birth, ask for and give information about date and place of birth, past tense of  “to be”questions with “do you?” with affirmative and negative answers, questions with “when/where?.”

Unit 4 exercises (con’t)

Unit 5 exercises. 

 

11-12

Unit 6:  Money—read/write/say dollar and cent amounts, recognize and add combinations of coins and bills, read and write checks, sequence story events, ask for and give information about the cost of something, identify common money transactions types, make purchases with cash/check/credit cards, recognize and dismiss telemarketers or other solicitors, questions with “how much/how many/may I/do you have?.”

Unit 6 exercises. 

 

13-15

Unit 7:  The Family—make inquiries and give information about the family, initiate and respond to introductions, use the telephone to ask for someone and respond to telephone inquiries, “this is (name relative),” questions with “who/how many, may I?.” 

Unit 7 exercises.

 

16-18

Review prior material for bi-monthly test.
Unit 8:  Food—identify common food and beverages, express personal likes and dislikes, order food and beverages at a restaurant, identify costs of food and beverages, identify the three basic meals, recognize singular and plural noun forms and forms of “to be,” questions with “how much?.”
Unit review exercises.
Week 16 bi-monthly exam. 
Unit 8 exercises.

 

 

19-21

Unit 9:  Health—say and write the parts of the body, describe and write about feelings and common symptoms of illness or injuries, describe an emergency situation, make inquiries and give information about health, make a doctor’s appointment, call for emergency assistance, “what’s the matter?/what happened?,” questions with “how many, do you, can you?.” 

Unit 9 exercises. 

 

22-24

Unit 10:  Work—identify common occupations, give information about work experiences, read and fill out job applications, use cursive handwriting with capital and small letters, write cursive script signature, imperatives, “do you want to be...?”

Review prior material for bi-monthly test. 
Unit 10 exercises. 
Unit review exercises.

Week 24 bi-monthly exam. 

rev. 3/08, 4/10, 4/11

 


501.1  English as a Second Language I                                          120 classes

Prerequisite(s):  None. 

 

Textbook: WorldView 1 (or comparable text), Pearson Education, 2002. 

 

Course Description:  A first level ESL course that introduces beginning students to basic vocabulary, spelling, grammar, conversation, pronunciation, and other ESL skills. 

 

Objectives:  To develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills that utilize the present, simple past, and present continuous tenses.   By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using the present and simple past tenses.  

 

Instructional Methods:  Daily classes encourage application of newly-learned skills to everyday situations through conversation, reading, and writing.  Language elements are introduced, used, and reused in different written, oral, and aural situations within contexts drawn from daily life.  Instruction will be supplemented with companion ESL video and music recordings keyed to textbook units.   

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Weeks

Topics

Assignments and Tests

 

1

Unit 1: Here’s My Card

Greetings and leave-takings, introductions; names; the alphabet; “be” simple present, affirmative statements, subject pronouns

WorldView Unit 1 Exercises: 

 

 

2

Unit 2 Title: Meeting People

People introducing themselves and saying what they do

:  “be” simple present; subject pronouns; indefinite articles

WorldView Unit 2 Exercises:

 

 

 

3

Unit 3 Title: Around The World

Nationalities and countries;“be” simple present; Yes/No questions; short answers and negative statements

WorldView Unit 3 Exercises:

 

 

4

Unit 4 Title: Setting Up a Home Office

Office objects; numbers 20-99:  plurals; “wh-“ questions

Review 1:  units 1-4

WorldView 4 Exercises:

 

 

5

Unit Title: Favorite Things

Free-time activities; possessive adjectives and possessive “’s”

WorldView 5 Exercises:

 

 

6

Unit 6 Title: Interesting Places

Adjectives describing places in the city : There is/There are

WorldView 6 Exercises:

 

 

7

 

Unit 7 Title: Office . . . or Living Room?

Furniture in an office or living room:  prepositions of location

WorldView 7 Exercises:

 

 

8

Unit 8 Title: Celebrations

Holiday celebrations; affirmative statements in simple present

Review 2

WorldView 8 Exercises:

 

Bi-Monthly Exam

 

9

Unit 9 Title: The Collectors

Objects people collect; numbers 100-1,000,000: simple present Y/N questions, short answers, and negative statements

WorldView 9 Exercises:

 

 

10

Unit 10 Title: The Modern World

Words related to communication:  “wh-“ questions in simple present

WorldView Exercises:

 

 

11

Unit 11 and 12 Titles: Traveling and Shopping

Things taken on vacation; types of transportation; clothes and sizes: “a/an/some/any”; demonstrative adjectives, “this/that/these/those”

WorldView 11 & 12 Exercises:

 

 

12

Unit 13 Title: How sweet it is!

Food:  count and non-count nouns; quantifiers “much/many/a lot of”; Review 3

WorldView 13 Exercises:

 

 

13

Unit 14 Title Job Exchange

Job duties:  modal “can” for ability; World of Music 2

WorldView 14 Exercises:

 

 

14

Units 15 & 16 Titles: Family & In a Cafe

Family members; food and drink:  present continuous and modals “would like/will have/ can” for ordering

WorldView 15 & 16 Exercises:

 

 

15

Unit 17 Title: Hurricane

Weather, seasons,: action and non-action verbs;

WorldView 17 Exercises:

 

 

16

Unit 18 Title: Memories

Clothes; memorable possessions, people, and events;  “be” simple past; Review 4

WorldView 18 Exercises:

 

Bi-Monthly Exam

 

17

Units 19 & 20 Titles:  A day in the life of . . .  & 

Love At First Sight

Everyday activities:  simple past of regular and irregular verbs (affirmative and negative); real-life love story and common irregular verbs

WorldView Exercises:

 

 

18

Review 5

Unit 21 Title: Life and Times

Important life events; simple past questions

WorldView 21 Exercises:

 

 

19

Unit 22 Title: It’s On the Right

Parts of a building, asking directions, and ordinal numbers 1st-10th:  imperatives; directions and prepositions of movement

World of Music 3

WorldView 22 Exercises:

 

 

20

Unit 23 Title: Big Plans 

Life changes:  “be going to” for future

WorldView 23 Exercises:

 

 

21

Unit 24 Title:  A New Year

Dates, months, and time; ordinal numbers 11th-31st;  prepositional phrases with time

WorldView 24 Exercises:

 

 

22

Units 25 & 26 Titles:  Be My Guest & North and South

Asking and responding; adjectives describing a country

:  “can/could” modals for permissions and requests; comparative adjectives

WorldView 25 & 26 Exercises:

 

 

23

Unit 27 Title: The Best Food in Town

Adjectives describing restaurants: superlative adjectives

World of Music 4

WorldView 27 Exercises:

 

 

24

Unit Title: On the Phone

Telephoning:  present continuous for future

Review 7

WorldView 28 Exercises:

Bi-Monthly Exam

rev. 2/05, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11


501.2  ESL II                                        120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  ESL I or High Beginner's placement test score

Textbooks:  P. Merdinger and L. Barton, NorthStar:  Listening and Speaking Level 1 (Second Edition), Longman, 2009 (or comparable). 

Course Description:  A second level ESL course that continues to reinforce beginning student's vocabulary, spelling, grammar, conversation, pronunciation, and other ESL skills in present, past, and future tenses. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using the present, future, and past tenses. 

 

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning from a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme. 

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

 

Course Outline: Each of the text's nine units is divided into the sections listed under “Topics” for weeks 1-3, applying the same format to different themes and content.  

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

Note:  All subsequent units will be organized like Unit 1. 

1-2

Unit 1 Theme:  "Faraway Friends"

Focus on the Topic: 

  Predicting—discussion from visual prompt    

  Sharing Information—individual and group

  Preparing to Listen Background Reading and Vocabulary for Comprehension

Focus on Listening

Listenings One and Two:

  Listening for Main Ideas

  Listening for Details

  Listening Between the Lines

  Linking Listening One and Two

Focus on Speaking

  Vocabulary

  Grammar—present and past of “to be”

  Speaking (Pronunciation--Rhythm, Function—Asking for More Information, Production--Introductions, Alternative Speaking Topics, Research Topics)

 

 

1.        Share information about visiting or living in another country.

2.        Interpret graphics and read about Friendhsip Force Member Countries

3.        Listen for main ideas, for details, make inferences, and express opinions,

4.        Integrate listenings one and two.

5.        Vocabulary cloze exercise.

6.        Expand a theme orally and in writing.

7.        Use correct form of “be” in a Cloze passage.

8.        Practice introductions using correct rhythm.

9.        Ask for more information.

10.     Introduce a friend to two classmates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

Unit 2 Theme:  Recycled Fashion

 

 

4

Unit 3 Theme:  Rap Music

 

 

5

Unit 4 Theme:  Something  Valuable

 

 

6

Unit 5 Theme:  Together is Better

 

 

7-8

Unit 6 Theme:  Thinking Young: Creativity in Business

 

Bi-Monthly exam, week 8

Bi-monthly exam, week 8.

9-10

Unit 7 Theme:  Planting Trees for Peace

 

11-12

Unit 8 Theme:  Driving You Crazy

 

13-14

Unit 9 Theme:  Only Child—Lonely Child?

 

 

15-16

Unit 10 Theme:  The Beautiful

Review for exam. 

 

Bi-monthly exam, week 8.

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11


501.3  English as a Second Language III (NorthStar: Basic/Low Intermediate)               120 classes                   

Prerequisite(s):  ESL II or Low Intermediate placement test score

 

Textbook:  NorthStar Listening and Speaking Basic/Low Intermediate 2nd ed., Pearson Education, 2004 (or comparable text). 

 

Course Description:  A third level ESL course that introduces intermediate students to a higher level of difficulty and fluency than ESL II requiring compound tenses, longer sentences, and simple complex sentence structures

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using compound tenses, simple complex sentences; longer sentences including more comparative adjectives and adverbs; verbs plus gerunds and infinitives; modals; and more extensive vocabulary  than expected of ESL I or II students. 

 

Instructional Methods: An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning in a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme.  Instruction is supplemented with ESL audio and video material keyed to textbook units.     

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-3

Introduction to NorthStar method.

NorthStar Unit 1 Theme:  Work

Communication Focus:  making predictions, expressing and defending opinions

Grammar Focus:  descriptive adjectives

Unit 1 Video Sequence. 

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

4-5

NorthStar Unit 2 Theme:  The Country and the City

Communication Focus:  sharing opinions, expressing agreement with “too” and “not either”; making past tense statements

Grammar Focus:  simple past tense

Unit 2 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

6-7

NorthStar Unit 3 Theme:  Money

Communication Focus:  making suggestions and coming to an agreement, comparing products, asking and answering questions

Grammar Focus:  comparative adjectives

Unit 3 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

Student video activity sheet. 

8

Review, Units 1-3

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay.

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

9-10

NorthStar Unit 4 Theme:  Animals

Communication Focus:  expressing opinions, constructing and performing a dialogue, asking for more information, asking and answering information questions

Unit 4 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

Student video activity sheet.   

11-12

NorthStar Unit 5 Theme:  Cell Phone Etiquette

Communication Focus:  comparing and discussing solutions, expressing likes and dislikes

Grammar Focus:  verbs plus gerunds and infinitives

Unit 5 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

Student video activity sheet. 

13-14

NorthStar Unit 6 Theme:  Male and Female Roles

Communication Focus:  making predictions, expressing opinions, using intonation to denote attitude, agreeing and disagreeing, asking and answering questions about daily habits

Grammar Focus:  adverbs and expressions of frequency

Unit Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

15

NorthStar Unit 7 Theme:  Food

Communication Focus:  making predictions, sharing opinions, comparing and discussing solutions, politely expressing wants, discussing a shopping list

Grammar Focus:  count and non-count nouns

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

16

Review, Units 4-7 (partial unit 7)

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

17

NorthStar Unit 7 continued.  

 

 

 

Unit 7 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

Student video activity sheet.

18-19

NorthStar Unit 8 Theme:  Travel

Communication Focus:  making polite requests, conducting and interview, agreeing and disagreeing, asking and answering travel questions

Grammar Focus:  “can/can’t”

Unit 8 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

Handbook reading and exercises corresponding to grammar focus of NorthStar text

 

Student video activity sheet

20-21

NorthStar Unit 9 Theme:  Health and Illness

Communication Focus:  making predictions and expressing opinions, expressing concern about health, giving and receiving advice

Grammar Focus:  “should/ought to/have to”

Unit 9 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

22-23

NorthStar Unit 10 Theme:  Endangered Languages

Communication Focus:  sharing background information, making predictions and expressing opinions, giving examples to explain a general statement, interpreting statistics

Unit 10 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

Student video activity sheet.   

24

Review, Units 8-10.

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Write a short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

 

 rev. 2/05, 2/07, 4/10


501.4  English as a Second Language IV (NorthStar: Intermediate)       120 classes         

Prerequisite(s):  ESL III or Intermediate placement test score

 

Textbook:  NorthStar:  Listening and Speaking Intermediate, 2nd ed., 2004 (or comparable text). 

 

Course Description:  A fourth level ESL course that introduces intermediate students to a higher level of difficulty and fluency than ESL III requiring compound tenses, more extensive vocabulary, and longer compound and complex sentences. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using compound tenses including modals, longer compound and complex sentences, more extensive vocabulary than expected of ESL III students, and other language skills required by response to a range of “Wh-“ questions.   

 

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning from a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme.  Instruction will be supplemented with ESL audio and video material keyed to textbook units

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-3

NorthStar Unit 1 Theme:  Advertising

Communication Focus:  making predictions, offering advice with imperatives, inferring word meaning, supporting answers with lecture information, comparing and contrasting, etc.

Grammar Focus:  imperatives

Unit 1 Video Sequence. 

NorthStar unit exercises.

Handbook reading and exercises for unit grammar

Student video activity sheet. 

4-5

NorthStar Unit 2 Theme:  Extreme Sports

Communication Focus:  discussing sports, elaborating extemporaneously, questioning preferences, defending opinions, inferring information, correlating examples, ranking activities, etc. 

Grammar Focus:  modals of preference

Unit 2 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

Handbook reading and exercises for unit grammar 

Student video activity sheet

6-7

NorthStar Unit 3 Theme:  Fraud

Communication Focus:  sharing experiences, making predictions, recounting experiences, defending opinions, facilitating discussion, making comarisons, inferring meaning, hypothesizing outcomes, etc.

Grammar Focus:  equatives and comparatives

Unit 3 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

Handbook reading and exercises for

grammar focus of NorthStar text. 

Student video activity sheet. 

8

Review, Units 1-3

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay.

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

9-10

NorthStar Unit 4 Theme:  Storytelling

Communication Focus:  making predictions; storytelling with adjectives, adverbs, and details; composing descriptive sentences; making statements of purpose, recording a story summary, analyzing storytelling techniques, analyzing and describing characters, matching actions to consequences, etc.

Grammar Focus:  infinitives of purpose

Unit 4 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

11-12

NorthStar Unit 5 Theme:  Language

Communication Focus: making predictions, comparing past and present abilities with modals, presenting a plan, etc.

Grammar Focus:  modals of ability and possibility

Unit 5 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet.

13-14

NorthStar Unit 6 Theme: Tourism (first half of unit)

Communication Focus:  making predictions, defending opinions, using transition, summarizing an interview, reevaluating advantages and disadvantages, interpreting word usage, analyzing and proposing solutions

Grammar Focus:  simple past tense

Unit 6 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

15

NorthStar Unit 7 Theme:  Humor

Communication Focus:  making predictions, sharing opinions, giving examples, discussing preferences, asking for repetition or clarification, etc.

Grammar Focus: “Wh-“ questions

NorthStar unit exercises.

  

16

Review, Units 4-7 (includes first half of unit 7)

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher  (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

17

NorthStar Unit 7 (second half of unit continued)

 

 

Unit 7 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

Student video activity sheet.

18-19

NorthStar Unit 8 Theme:  Fashion

Communication Focus:  making predictions, expressing opinions, giving impromptu definitions, manipulating intonations for meaning, comparing and contrasting, analyzing word ,interpreting significance 

Grammar Focus:  “used to”

Unit 8 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet

20-21

NorthStar Unit 9 Theme:  Punishment

Communication Focus:  sharing background information, making predictions and expressing opinions, supporting opinion, asking and answering questions, summarizing observations, recognizing personal assumptions, evaluating argument’s persuasiveness, comparing and contrasting past and present practices

Grammar Focus:  present perfect tense

Unit 9 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

22-23

NorthStar Unit 10 Theme:  Marriage

Communication Focus:  making predictions and expressing opinions, using word stress for meaning, interrupting politely, interpreting quotations, supporting opinions with information, developing arguments for or against an issue, evaluating the quality of arguments

Grammar Focus:  articles

Unit 10 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

24

Review, Units 8-10.

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

            rev. 2/05, 2/07, 2/08, 4/10

 


501.5  English as a Second Language V (NorthStar: High Intermediate) 120 Hours

Prerequisite(s):  ESL IV or High Intermediate placement test score

 

Textbook:  NorthStar:  Listening and Speaking High Intermediate, 2nd ed., 2004 (or comparable text).  

 

Course Description:  A fifth level ESL course that introduces high intermediate students to a higher level of difficulty and fluency than ESL IV requiring more compound tenses, more extensive vocabulary, and more compound and complex sentences organized into longer oral and written presentations. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using compound and complex sentences and more extensive vocabulary than expected of ESL IV students. 

 

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning from a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme.  Instruction will be supplemented with ESL audio and video material keyed to textbook units

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:         

Weeks

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-3

Review of NorthStar method.

NorthStar Unit 1 Theme:  Media

Communication Focus:  making predictions, summarizing points, making inferences and interpreting data, expressing and defending opinions. Grammar Focus:  passive voice. 

Unit 1 Video Sequence. 

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

4-5

NorthStar Unit 2 Theme:  Overcoming Obstacles

Communication Focus:  making predictions; analyzing narrative techniques in an essay; hypothesizing another’s point of view; analyzing sensitive language (pertaining to disabilities); inferring meaning not explicit in the text, comparing and contrasting (life histories); framing contrasting points of view; using synonyms, parallelism, and prepositional phrases to enrich a narrative. 

Grammar Focus:  gerunds and infinitives

Unit 2 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet

6-7

NorthStar Unit 3 Theme:  Medicine

Communication Focus:  making contrastive statements with appropriate intonation, interrupting politely to clarify or confirm information, interpreting a cartoons and a quotation, comparing and contrasting

Grammar Focus:  present unreal conditionals

Unit 3 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

8

Review, Units 1-3

Drafting, editing, and re-writing essay.

Write an essay based on topic assigned by teacher (to become part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

9-10

NorthStar Unit 4 Theme:  Natural Disasters

Communication Focus: using context clues to guess meaning, analyzing a speaker’s emotions, inferring meaning from context, hypothesizing another’s point of view, making judgments, supporting opinions with information from reports, sharing personal experiences and fears, expressing reactions to news

Grammar Focus: adjective clauses

Unit 4 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

11-12

NorthStar Unit 5 Theme:  Conservation

Communication Focus: interpreting quotations, drawing conclusions, supporting generalizations with examples, analyzing symbolism in a poem, reading or reciting a poem aloud

Grammar Focus:  advisability in the past using past modals

Unit 5 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

13-14

NorthStar Unit 6 Theme: Philanthropy

Communication Focus:  making judgments, identifying personal assumptions (about philanthropy), correlating abstract principles with concrete examples, comparing and contrasting information, asking for clarifications using tag questions, using gambits to indicate priorities

Grammar Focus:  tag questions

Unit 6 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

15

NorthStar Unit 7 Theme: Education (1st half of unit)

Communication Focus:  defining notions of intelligence, identifying and analyzing assumptions (about intelligence), connecting principles (of emotional intelligence) to specific behaviors, analyzing past encounters according to principles (of emotional intelligence), using opening gambits to restate information for clarification or emphasis, restating quotations

Grammar Focus:  direct an indirect speech

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

16

Review, Units 4-7 (partial unit 7)

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (to become part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

17

NorthStar Unit 7 (2nd half of unit) 

 

 

 

Unit 7 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

Student video activity sheet.

18-19

NorthStar Unit 8 Theme:  Food

Communication Focus:  identifying and analyzing (food) trends, relating general factors to specific behaviors, comparing traditional and contemporary (food) practices, comparing and contrasting (restaurants), inferring situational context

Grammar Focus: phrasal verbs

Unit 8 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet

20-21

NorthStar Unit 9 Theme:  Immigration

Communication Focus:  recognizing personal assumptions, inferring meaning, analyzing language usage, comparing and contrasting (2 immigrant experiences), proposing solutions, practicing gambits to hesitate in response to a questions, asking and answering questions about data. 

Grammar Focus:  present and past—contrasting verb tenses

Unit 9 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

22-23

NorthStar Unit 10 Theme: Technology 

Communication Focus: interpreting cartoons, comparing opinions (about technology), analyzing paradox (in a poem), making judgments, drawing conclusions, defining a problem and proposing a solution, discussing probable future outcomes, practicing gambits to express frustration

Grammar Focus:  future perfect and future progressive

Unit 10 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

24

Review, Units 8-10.

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (to become part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

            2/05, 2/07, 2/08, 4/10


501.6  English as a Second Language VI (NorthStar: Advanced)    120 classes

Prerequisite(s):  ESL V or Advanced placement test score

 

Textbook:  NorthStar:  Listening and Speaking Advanced, 2nd ed., 2004 (or comparable text); Longman Dictionary of American English now with Thesaurus, 3rd or later edition, Pearson, 2004 (recommended).   

 

Course Description:  A sixth level ESL course that introduces advanced students to a higher level of difficulty and fluency than ESL V requiring wish statements, expressions of unreality, spoken discourse connections, direct and indirect speech, and compound verbs including passive voice and modals organized into longer oral and written presentations. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using longer compound and complex sentences and more extensive vocabulary than expected of ESL V students.  They should be comfortable with the communication of wishes, unreality, and urgency.  They should recognize and use discourse connectors, direct and indirect speech, compound tenses including the passive causative and modals of uncertainty.  They should be able to apply these language skills at a higher level of critical thinking to make predictions, express and defend opinions, summarize information, retell a conversation, and compare and contrast.   

 

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning from a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme.  Instruction will be supplemented with ESL audio and video material keyed to textbook units

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-3

Review of NorthStar method.

NorthStar Unit 1 Theme:  The Internet and Other Addictions

Communication Focus:  making predictions, expressing and defending opinions, using vocabulary in guided conversation, conducting a survey and reporting results, etc.  

Grammar Focus:  wish statements (expressing unreality). 

Unit 1 Video Sequence. 

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

4-5

NorthStar Unit 2 Theme:  Celebration, Florida:  Disney’s Utopia

Communication Focus:  making predictions; summarizing ideas, expressing conjecture, making a short oral presentation.

Grammar Focus:  noun clauses after verbs of urgency.

Unit 2 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet

6-7

NorthStar Unit 3 Theme:  The Bold and the Bashful

Communication Focus:  making predictions, expressing and defending opinions, using new vocabulary in extemporaneous responses, describing one’s personality, using gambits (to express uncertainty, to break the ice, and to maintain a conversation), presenting research results

Grammar Focus:  identifying and nonidentifying adjective clauses

Unit 3 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

8

Review, Units 1-3

Drafting, editing, and re-writing essay.

Write an essay based on topic assigned by teacher (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

9-10

NorthStar Unit 4 Theme:  The Tipping Point

Communication Focus:  using metaphors, using introductory expressions to restate, presenting findings

Grammar Focus: adverbs clauses of result

Unit 4 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

11-12

NorthStar Unit 5 Theme:  Feng Shui: Ancient Wisdom Travels West

Communication Focus: summarizing information, expressing and defending opinions, using new vocabulary and discourse connectors

Grammar Focus:  spoken discourse connectors

Unit 5 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

13-14

NorthStar Unit 6 Theme: Spiritual Renewal

Communication Focus:  brainstorming motivations, summarizing using new vocabulary, using hesitation in extemporaneous responses, planning and presenting a longer oral presentation, etc.

Grammar Focus:  Count and non-count nouns and their quantifiers

Unit 6 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

15-16

NorthStar Unit 7 Theme: Workplace Privacy

Communication Focus:  Brainstorming language of privacy, making predictions, practicing correct stress patterns, conducting short interviews and summarizing finding, etc. 

Grammar Focus:  two forms and meanings of verb+gerund

Unit 7 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity worksheet

17

Review, Units 4-7

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

18-19

NorthStar Unit 8 Theme:  Warriors Without Weapons

Communication Focus:  comparing background experiences, using opening gambits, defending opinions, posing and respond to questions with new vocabulary, retelling a conversation, etc.

Grammar Focus: direct and indirect speech

Unit 8 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises

 

 

Student video activity sheet

20-21

NorthStar Unit 9 Theme:  Boosting Brain Power through the Arts

Communication Focus:  comparing knowledge and reactions, summarizing information, using figurative language, using transitions to compare and contrast, etc.

Grammar Focus:  passive voice and passive causative

Unit 9 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

22-23

NorthStar Unit 10 Theme: Television and Freedom of Expression

Communication Focus: making predictions, supporting an opinion with examples, using new vocabulary in a role play, using phrasal verbs, expressing degrees of certainty with modals, using gambits, conducting short interviews and summarizing findings, etc.

Grammar Focus:  modals to express degrees of certainty

Unit 10 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

24

Review, Units 8-10.

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Write short essay based on topic assigned by teacher (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

            rev. 10/05, 2/07, 4/10

 


502  Business English Communication                                        120 Classes

Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite:  English 501.5 or equivalent

Textbooks:  NorthStar: Reading and Writing High Intermediate, 2nd ed., Pearson Education, 2004 (or comparable text).  Longman Dictionary of American English now with Thesaurus, 3rd or later edition, Pearson, 2004 (recommended). 

Course Description: Business English teaches English language skills designed to help students communicate more successfully in a business and real world environment.  The course emphasizes writing as a process of development that includes drafting, writing, editing, and reading that conveys the writer’s intentions clearly and correctly.   

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students are expected: 

 

Instructional Methods:  Students develop reading and writing skills from an integrated cumulative skills approach that increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to create meaning in a new language through active learning activities.  Longer reading passages and recorded listening passages, and videos build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students are guided through the writing process, followed by practice in context activities that allow them to apply each new writing concept to their own writing.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme. 

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-3

NorthStar Unit 1 Theme:  Media

Communication Focus:  classifying information, drawing conclusions, developing topic sentences, writing a letter to the editor, etc.

Grammar Focus:  passive voice. 

Unit 1 Video Sequence. 

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

4-5

NorthStar Unit 2 Theme:  Overcoming Obstacles

Communication Focus:  comparing and contrasting, finding correlations, writing a three-part paragraph, editing extraneous information, composing supporting sentences using transitions, summarizing research in a report, etc.

Grammar Focus:  gerunds and infinitives

Unit 2 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises. 

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet

6-7

NorthStar Unit 3 Theme:  Medicine

Communication Focus: comparing and contrasting, drawing logical conclusions, writing an opinion essay with evidence, summarizing research, etc

Grammar Focus:  past unreal conditionals

Unit 3 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

8

Review, Units 1-3

Drafting, editing, and re-writing essays.

Assigned essay (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

9-10

NorthStar Unit 4 Theme:  Natural Disasters

Communication Focus: classifying information, analyzing descriptive language, writing descriptive sentences and paragraphs, writing a paragraph that underscores similarities, using adjectives for description, etc. 

Grammar Focus: identifying adjective clauses

Unit 4 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

11-12

NorthStar Unit 5 Theme:  Conservation

Communication Focus: comparing observations, identifying language of cause and effect, writing cause and effect sentences and essay, using subordinate conjunctions and transitions to express cause and effects

Grammar Focus:  advisability and obligation in the past

Unit 5 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

13-14

NorthStar Unit 6 Theme: Philanthropy

Communication Focus:  identifying opinions, relating specific examples to broad themes, expressing an opinion in a letter, writing an essay

Grammar Focus:  tag questions

Unit 6 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

15

NorthStar Unit 7 Theme: Education (1st half of unit)

Communication Focus: evaluating and classifying, comparing and contrasting, using concessive language, writing an opinion essay, write dependent clauses

Grammar Focus:  direct and indirect speech

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

. 

16

Review, Units 4-7 (partial unit 7)

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Assigned essay (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

17

NorthStar Unit 7 (2nd half of unit) 

 

Unit 7 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises 

Student video activity sheet.

18-19

NorthStar Unit 8 Theme:  Food

Communication Focus:  comparing and contrasting information, writing narrative, practicing parallel structure and sentence variation

Grammar Focus: phrasal verbs

Unit 8 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises

 

 

Student video activity sheet

20-21

NorthStar Unit 9 Theme:  Immigration

Communication Focus:  classifying; interpreting, comparing, and contrasting imagery; writing a compare and contrast essay, using transitional expressions and subordinating conjunctions, etc.

Grammar Focus:  past perfect and time words

Unit 9 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

22-23

NorthStar Unit 10 Theme: Technology 

Communication Focus: comparing and contrasting, supporting inferences with examples, taking notes, developing an essay from an outline

Grammar Focus:  future progressive and time clauses

Unit 10 Video Sequence

NorthStar unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

24

Review, Units 8-10.

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Assigned essay (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

                rev. 6/06, 4/10


503  Advanced Reading and Writing                                    120 Hours

Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite:  English 501.6 (level VI) or equivalent.

Textbooks:  NorthStar 5 Reading and Writing, 3rd ed., Pearson Education, 2009 (or comparable text); Longman Dictionary of American English now with Thesaurus, 3rd or later edition, Pearson, 2004 (recommended). 

Course Description: Advanced Reading and Writing develops advanced English language skills through close examination of reading passages, through objective discussion of reading, and through paragraph and short essay writing.  The course develops personal, academic, and workplace advanced English reading, writing, and oral presentation skills at the multi-paragraph and document level. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students should be able: 

 

Instructional Methods:  Students develop language skills from an integrated cumulative skills approach that increases retention and fluency by stimulating them to create meaning in a new language.  Longer reading passages, recorded listening passages, and videos build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students are guided through the writing process, followed by practice in context activities to apply each new writing concept to their own writing.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme. 

 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-3

NorthStar Unit 1 Theme:  Addiction

Communication Focus: supporting answers; inferring non-explicit information; identifying argument’s logic; writing summary paragraphs, personal letters, reports, etc.   

Grammar Focus:  past unreal conditionals. 

Unit 1 Video Sequence. 

Unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

4-5

NorthStar Unit 2 Theme:  Lying

Communication Focus: recognizing personal attitudes and values, developing thesis statements and introductory paragraphs, writing statements of opinion using noun clauses; summarizing research, etc.

Grammar Focus:  double comparatives

Unit 2 Video Sequence

Unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet

6-7

NorthStar Unit 3 Theme:  Personality

Communication Focus:  identifying personality traits; analyzing character and motivation, writing short statements of advice; combining sentences using relative pronouns; writing a short article; summarizing an interview, etc.  

Grammar Focus:  identifying and nonidentifying adjective clauses

Unit 3 Video Sequence

Unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

8

Review, Units 1-3

Drafting, editing, and re-writing essay.

Assigned essay (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

9-10

NorthStar Unit 4 Theme: Trends

Communication Focus: identifying and interpreting trends, examining imagery and symbolism, analyzing author’s purpose, writing cause-and-effect paragraphs and essays, combining sentences using discourse connectors and adverb clauses

Grammar Focus: adverb clauses and discourse connectors to express cause and effect

Unit 4 Video Sequence

Unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

11-12

NorthStar Unit 5 Theme:  Cross-Cultural Insights

Communication Focus: comparing and contrasting , identifying point of view, inferring characters’ attitudes and feelings, writing a compare-and-contrast essay, etc. 

Grammar Focus:  adverb clauses of comparison and contrast

Unit 5 Video Sequence

Unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet. 

13-14

NorthStar Unit 6 Theme: Religion

Communication Focus: relating supporting details to main ideas, supporting answers with information; writing a definition essay; paraphrasing quotations; writing summary statements, essay responses, and reports, etc.  

Grammar Focus:  definite and indefinite articles; count and non-count nouns.

Unit 6 Video Sequence

Unit exercises.

 

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

15-16

NorthStar Unit 7 Theme: Business (1st half of unit)

Communication Focus: assessing personal traits, analyzing a case study, evaluating and writing about advantages and disadvantages, writing persuasive statements, composing transitional sentences, summarizing questionnaire data

Grammar Focus:  infinitives and gerunds

Review, Units 4-7 (partial unit 7)

Drafting, editing, and re-writing short essay. 

Unit exercises.

Assigned essay (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam, week 16.

17

NorthStar Unit 7 (2nd half of unit) 

 

Unit 7 Video Sequence

Unit exercises.

Student video activity sheet.

18-19

NorthStar Unit 8 Theme:  The Military

Communication Focus:  recognizing personal values and assumptions; making generalizations; writing summaries, a personal letter, a dialog, etc. 

Grammar Focus: direct and indirect speech

Unit 8 Video Sequence

Unit exercises

 

 

Student video activity sheet

20-21

NorthStar Unit 9 Theme:  The Arts

Communication Focus: theorizing motivations, analyzing descriptive language, writing a descriptive paragraph, evaluating passive voice usage

Grammar Focus:  use of the passive voice

Unit 9 Video Sequence

Unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet.  

22-23

NorthStar Unit 10 Theme: Poverty

Communication Focus: identifying personal assumptions, analyzing argumentative language, writing argumentatively in different document forms, etc. 

Grammar Focus:  noun clauses in apposition

Unit 10 Video Sequence

Unit exercises.

 

 

Student video activity sheet.   

24

Review, Units 8-10.

Drafting, editing, and re-writing essay. 

Assigned essay (part of bi-monthly grade)

Bi-monthly Exam

            rev.  6/06, 2/07, 2/08, 4/10, 4/11


604  High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation            120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  None

Textbooks:  Patricia Mulcrone, Contemporary’s Complete GED:  Comprehensive Study Program for the High School Equivalency Examination, McGraw Hill, 2002 (or comparable text). 

Course Description: This course is designed to help students prepare for the language arts and subject areas GED Tests of the State of New York.  The course also introduces students to GED testing procedures, scoring information, and test taking hints. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students will have received: 

 

 

Instructional Methods:  Classroom review of GED areas followed by extensive exercises and practice with simulated and actual test material.  In addition to practice in writing the GED essay in the Language Arts and Writing component of the course, students will write and receive feedback on essay writing at other points in the course based on the text's suggested topics related most closely to the area being studied at the time. 

 

. Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:         

Weeks

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-4

Introduction to the textbook and textbook aids.

Overview of GED tests.

Language Arts and Writing

Language Arts and Writing diagnostic test.  Language Arts and Writing review: 

Practice with GED-type questions, including essay topics

Part II Language Arts/Writing practice questions.

Essay—question 2 or 10, p. 232. 

5-8

Social Studies

Social Studies diagnostic test.

Social Studies review:  close reading and interpretation of selected passages in American and world history, economics, geography, civics, and government.  Specific readings from the US Constitution, the Federalist Papers, and a Supreme court case.  Understanding and interpreting graphs.  Strategies for answering Social Studies questions.  

Practice with GED-type questions, including essay topics

Review for course test. 

Part III Social Studies practice questions. 

Essay—question 4 or 7, p. 232. 

Course test, week 8. 

.  

9-12

Science diagnostic test. 

Overview of Science questions:  comprehension, application, analysis, and evaluation questions with an emphasis upon science and its impact in everyday life. 

Science review:  life sciences, physical science, earth and space science; the history and nature of science, learning about science, importance of science in everyday life.

Strategies for answering Science questions.

Practice with GED-type questions, including essay topics

Course quiz.

Part IV Science practice questions. 

Essay—question 1 or 5, p. 232. 

Course quiz. 

13-17

Language Arts and Reading diagnostic test.  Language Arts and Reading review:   critical reading, paraphrasing, identifying main ideas, recalling details, summarizing, defining vocabulary; classifying, generalizing; determining cause and effect, distinguishing fact from opinion, interpreting figurative language, drawing conclusions, synthesizing information. 

Reading charts, graphs, maps, and illustrations. 

Practice with GED-type questions, including essay topics

Review for course test. 

Part V Language Arts/Reading practice questions. 

Essay—question 9 or 10. p. 232.

Course test, week 16.  

18-21

Mathematics diagnostic test.

Overview of Mathematics testing:  applications and solutions based on short readings, graphs, charts, diagrams, tables, etc.

Using the calculator.  

Mathematics review:  fractions, decimals, percents, multiplication and division shortcuts, powers and roots, measurement, statistics and probability. 

Interpreting graphs and sequences. 

Operations with algebraic expressions:  equations and inequalities. 

Geometry.   

Practice with GED-type questions, including essay topics

Part V Mathematics practice questions. 

Essay—any question not already selected from p. 232.  

22-24

Practicing complete sample tests, including the essay:  emphasis upon error analysis and test taking strategies. 

Final course test. 

TBA.

Course test, week 24. 

 

rev. 2/04, 02/07, 4/10, 4/11


605 Pre-GED Foundation for GED Preparation                              80 hours

 

Prerequisite:  Placement test. 

 

Textbook:  Complete Pre-GED:  A Comprehensive Review of the Skills Necessary for GED Study.  McGraw Hill Contemporary, 2003 or comparable edition. 

 

Course Description:  While developing English language skills, this course is designed to provide the foundation for GED preparation in the areas of Language Arts: Reading, Language Arts: Writing, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics. 

 

Objectives:  By the end of the course, students will have received: 

 

 

Instructional Methods:  Classroom review of pre-GED skills followed by extensive exercises and practice with periodic pre- and post-testing and assessment. 

 

Grading:   The final grade is based on the following: 

 

Class Participation

25%

Assignments

50%

Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D-65-69%, F=60-64%

 

Course Outline: 

 

Weeks

Topics

 

1-3

Language Arts:  Reading

 

 

Gaining meaning from words, understanding what you have read, finding hidden meaning, organizing ideas, understanding fiction, understanding poetry and drama.

Language Arts:  Reading Chapters 1-6, pp. 189-327. 

 

Reading pre-and post-tests. 

4-6

 

 

 

Parts of speech, sentences, nouns and pronouns, verbs, subject-verb agreement, adjectives and adverbs, combining sentences and organizing paragraphs, sentences and paragraphs.