Spanish-American Institute

 

 

Instructional Resource Manual

Fall 2010

Spanish-American Institute Library. 0

Institute “Fair Use” Copyright Policy. 0

Public Library Access. 0

Information Literacy. 0

Textbook Companion Materials: 0

Other Multi-Media Instructional Resources. 0

Spanish-American Institute Library. 4

Spanish-American Institute” Fair Use” Guidelines for Duplication of Copyrighted Material 6

Public Library Access. 7

Obtaining a Library Card: 7

Library Systems: 7

Branch (Local) Libraries: 7

Research Libraries: 7

Applying for a Card: 8

Information Literacy Skills Development 10

Introduction to Multi-Media Resources. 13

Call Numbers and Barcodes. 15

VIDEO.. 17

AUDIO.. 20

Video Lessons. 24

Thematic Video Collections. 32

Tape II 61

Pronunciation Materials. 74

 


 

Spanish-American Institute Library

Automated Catalog

Electronic Databases

Information Literacy Tutorials

Teacher’s Professional Library

Institute “Fair Use” Copyright Policy

Public Library Access

Information Literacy

Textbook Companion Materials: 

Teachers’ Manuals

Test Materials

A-V Materials

Other Multi-Media Instructional Resources

Video Lessons

Thematic Videos

Authentic Video Materials

Pronunciation Materials

 

 

 

 

215 West 43 Street   Times Square, Manhattan, New York 10036   voice: 212.840.7111    fax: 212.719.5922    www.sai.nyc   info@sai.nyc


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Start page

Spanish-American Institute Library

Automated Catalog

Electronic Databases

Information Literacy Tutorials

Circulating and Non-Circulating Items

Professional Library

Library Use

3

 

 

turning pagesSpanish-American Institute “Fair Use” Guidelines for Duplication of Copyrighted Material

5

Public Library Access

 

Library Systems

Locating Branches

Branch and Research Libraries

Applying for a Card

Important Identification

Accessing Electronic Databases

6

Information Literacy Skills Development

8

Introduction to Multi-Media Resources

10

Call Numbers and Barcodes for ESL Audio-Video Material and Teacher’s Manuals

 

11

Video Lessons: 

Critical Thinking Skills and Language Development in Video Lessons

 

17

WorldView and NorthStar Videos

21

Thematic Videos

22

    Electrical Safety Videos

22

Electrical Safety Tips With Safety Man

22

Operation Decoration

23

UL Appliance Safety

23

    Volunteerism Videos

24

Don’t Be Blind to Diabetes

24

New Glasses, New Life . . .

25

Down the Street and Around the World

25

The Future is Ours. . So Now What?

25

    Invention and Innovation Videos

27

Lewis Latimer:  renaissance man, African-American Inventor

27

She’s got it:  women inventors and their inspirations

27

Reinventing the wheel:  the continuing evaluation of the bicycle

27

Sound, Light, Edison: . . .

28

The electric guitar:  its makers and players

28

    Environmental Videos

30

Sunkist:  Growing the Future

30

Saving a Species

31

Science in Action for Conservation:  Understanding and Protecting Biodiversity

33

Environmental Concerns and Policies (in The European Union)

33

Other Short Thematic Audio, Video, and Print Material

34

Pears:  A Taste for All Seasons

34

A Laundry Epic:  Gone With the Wash

35

Breaking the Code:  Sequencing the Arabidopsis Genome

35

Crossroads Café:  Opening Day

36

The European Union

36

Master Your Future:  A Program on Financial Responsibility

38

Mr. Jelly Belly’s Factory Tour

38

Veterinary Medicine

39

The Fed Today

40

Martin Luther King, Jr. Instructional Materials

41

Other ESL Audio and Video Instructional Material

42

Communicate:  A Video Course in English, Vols. 1-4 and 5-8

42

Follow Me to San Francisco

46

Open For Business

47

Perfect English:  How to Pronounce . . .

48

Side By Side TV

48

True Voices

49

Understanding Business and Personal Law

52

Your Life in Your Hands

53

Authentic and Other Commercial Videos

56

Five Star Films:  An Intermediate Listening/Speaking Text

56

American Picture Show:  A Cultural Reader

56

Children of a Lesser God

57

A Coalminer’s Daughter

57

To Kill A Mockingbird

57

The Milagro Beanfield Wars

58

We All Came to America

58

Pronunciation Materials

59

American Accent Training: . . .

59

American English Pronunciation:  It’s No Good Unless You’re Understood

59

American English Pronunciation: . . .

59

American Accent Guide: . . .

59

Hummingbird

59

Pronounce It Perfectly in English

59


 

 

http://www.fotosearch.com/IMZ173/vmo0270/       

 

 

Spanish-American Institute Library

 

 

The Spanish-American Institute maintains a balanced collection of over 1000 print and multi-media materials.  Collection development is guided by: 

 

q       faculty recommendations,

q       textbook correlations and program support,

q       information about New York City and American culture of interest to international students, and

q       faculty professional development.  

 

Automated Catalog, Electronic Databases, and Information Literacy Tutorials:

  In additional to the physical Library, the Spanish-American Institute provides access to Library information and materials on-line through the automated catalog, electronic databases, and information literacy tutorials. 

 

Automated Catalog--The Institute catalogs the Library collection according to the Dewey Decimal System.  The Library Catalog is automated.  Students, faculty, and staff can access the Catalog from any networked computer in the school.  To access the Catalog, go to www.sai.nyc and click Library on the left-hand menu. 

 

Electronic Databases The Spanish-American Institute Library website also provides online access to a variety of general and specialized automated periodical and other indexes through a search engine called EBSCOHost.  Among others, EBSCOHost contains the database MasterFILE Select.  MasterFILE Select is updated daily with full text articles from more than 700 general reference publications going back to 1984.  It contains hundreds of thousands of articles and other documents.  Users can save, print, download, e-mail and/or otherwise copy the full-text articles in the MasterFILE Select and other electronic databases provided by EBSCOHost.  .   

 

Information Literacy Tutorials--The Library website includes information literacy tutorials to help students develop sound information literacy search capabilities.  The tutorials teach basic search skills AND ways to evaluate the value and validity of information from the Internet, from electronic databases, and from other sources. 

 

Circulating and Non-Circulating Items:

  The Library collection contains circulating and non-circulating items. 

 

Non-Circulating Material--Print collection reference material such as the Encyclopedia Britannica does not circulate.  Non-circulating print material can be used only in the Library. 

 

Multi-media material can be checked out through the Bookstore on a temporary basis by faculty for classroom use.  The Institute updates and distributes this Instructional Resource Manual periodically so that faculty will have quick access to a comprehensive list of call numbers and barcodes for classroom related multi-media material. 

 

Circulating Material--Students, faculty, and staff may borrow circulating material from the Library by checking it out through the Bookstore. 

 

Professional Library:

  The Spanish-American Institute Library also includes a collection related to curriculum and instruction for faculty use and consultation. 

 

Library Use:

  Faculty are encouraged to bring groups of students to the Library for specific activities related to library education or library research.  Students may use the Library for browsing, research, or study during school hours by logging their names and student ID numbers in the logbook maintained just outside the Library entrance.    

 

 


 

Spanish-American Institute” Fair Use” Guidelines forturning pages Duplication of Copyrighted Material

 

 

The Spanish-American Institute requires faculty to observe the legal restrictions on duplication of copyrighted material in the United States Copyright Law.  The Law's "fair use" guidelines restrict the duplication of print and graphic material for classroom use.   

 

Faculty are required to observe the following school copyright policy.  This policy applies to all materials used in the classroom, whether the material was duplicated at the Spanish-American Institute or by a source outside the school: 

 

1.  "Consumable works" such as workbook material may never be copied for classroom use.

 

2.  The same item shall not be duplicated over and over again.

 

3.  No more than 10% or 1,000 words of a longer prose work, whichever is less, may be duplicated for classroom use.

 

4.  For all other material, consult with the Dean of Academic Affairs before copying or duplicating.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Symbol of the American Library Association

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.fotofocus.co.uk/Dg%20Foto%20Art%20Lite.html

 

Public Library Access

 

 

The Spanish-American Institute encourages faculty to inform students about free public libraries in their communities. 

 

Faculty should explain that the free public library is a remarkable American institution.  Every American community, even the smallest, tries to provide a free public library supported by local and state taxes. Public libraries offer many different resources.  In addition to loaning books and media materials, many local libraries offer free classes in computers or English, free cultural events, and other activities.  The local library also often serves as a community center with meeting rooms, with bulletin boards, and with programs for children and adults.

 

Dr. Prager, the Dean of Academic Affairs, will provide additional copies of the following information to share with classes.  She will also come into classes to talk about the Spanish-American Institute Library and public libraries, upon invitation. 

 

Obtaining a Library Card:

  Individuals who live, work, or go to school in New York City are entitled to a free NYC public library card.  Individuals who live elsewhere may also obtain library cards from their local libraries.  Faculty should encourage students to obtain a public library card.  Dr. Prager has handouts about how to do this with model application forms for the New York Public Library system. 

 

Library Systems: 

The NYPL system is divided into two parts, the branch libraries and the research libraries.   The New York Public Library (NYPL) has many branches in Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island.  It does not serve Brooklyn or Queens which have their own public library systems.  However, a NYPL card can be used in the Brooklyn and Queens system and vice versa. 

 

Branch (Local) Libraries:

  The New York Public Library (NYPL) home page is—www.nypl.org.  The homepage provides links to information about all NYPL branches and hours as well as links to the Brooklyn and Queens library systems.

 

Research Libraries:

  The research libraries do not circulate materials.  In other words, materials can only be used in the library but not taken home. Because they are research libraries designed for advanced scholarship, they do not have the community flavor and do not provide the community services found in local branch libraries like those in local neighborhood.     

 

The Humanities and Social Science Research Library.  Individuals may visit the exhibits and other public spaces in the Research Library on 5th Ave. and 42nd Street.  However, they are not encouraged to use the books and other research materials intended for use by individuals doing serious academic research in the humanities or social sciences (e.g., history, literature, art, etc.) such as graduate students and academic scholars. Instead, undergraduate students and the general public are encouraged to use the Mid-Manhattan Library just across the street at 41st and 5th Ave.    

 

The Science, Industry, and Business Library on 5th Ave. at 34th St. may be used by anyone.  However, it also does not circulate materials

 

 

Applying for a Card:

  Anyone who lives, works, or goes to school in New York City is entitled to a NYPL card.  Having a public library card entitles you to borrow books and other materials and provides you with a PIN number (personal identification number) for on-line searching. 

 

You may apply for a NYPL library card in person at any library branch.  The local libraries closest to the Institute are the Columbus Branch at 742 10th Avenue and the Mid-Manhattan Library at 41st St. and 5th Ave. 

 

Remember, your NYPL card can be used at any branch or other library in the NYPL system.  

 

Important Identification:

 The only identification needed is a student ID card plus at least one form of “current traceable” identification that establishes name and local home address.  The following are typically considered forms of “current traceable” identification.  These are examples only--a driver’s license, a rent receipt, a utility bill, a bankbook, or an apartment lease.  Sometimes, the library will accept a magazine subscription sent to your address as identification. 

 

With appropriate identification, the branch library will immediately issue you a library card with your PIN as soon as you complete the application.  

 

Remote Access to Public Library Electronic Databases: 

You will need a library PIN to access some or all public library electronic databases remotely from your home or another remote computer. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Information Literacy Skills Development

 

The Spanish-American Institute encourages faculty to develop student information literacy skills in each course and at each ESL level.  The syllabi for courses such as Internet and College Success have specific information literacy modules.  In addition, most textbooks in current use contain research and information literacy development activities designed to help students become more adept at accessing and using information from a variety of sources. 

 

Model ESL Information Literacy Activities:

  In addition to using textbook activities designed to increase information literacy skills, teachers can also generate activities easily integrated into classroom instruction.  The following are a few examples that demonstrate how this might be done at any ESL levels or any program course. 

 

ESL I

 

1.         Parts of a Book Vocabulary (Introductory)—identify the title page, the author, the preface, the introduction, the index, the contents/table of contents (including the chapters, units, lessons, etc.), the glossary, the spine, lines, line numbers, the number of pages (in a chapter, in a book, in a lesson, etc.), the front cover, the back cover, the inside front cover, the publisher, the date of publication, etc. 

 

2.         Print Presentation (Formatting) Vocabulary—identify formats such as dialogue, sentences, paragraphs, exercise, reading passage, workbook/handbook, etc. 

 

ESL II

 

3.         Parts of a Book Vocabulary (Basic)—identify the title page, the author, the preface, the introduction, the index, the contents/table of contents (including the chapters, units, lessons, etc.), the glossary, the spine, the number of pages (in a chapter, in a book, in a lesson, etc.), the front cover, the back cover, the inside front cover, the publisher, the date of publication, etc. 

 

4          Information Format—identify formats such as dialogue, sentences, paragraphs, exercise, reading passage, workbook/handbook, etc.  Also, pictures, illustrations, drawings, charts and tables, magazine, newspaper, article, etc. 

 

5.         NorthStar Introductory Fieldwork--build information literacy skills into some of the "Fieldwork" activities at the end of each unit.   NorthStar "Fieldwork" asks students to do guided research and make presentations based on the research. For example,

 

  • In Unit 1, they look up an organization on a web site. 
  • In Unit 5, they look up information about a young entrepreneur in the library and/or on the Internet. 
  • In Unit 6, they do the same for a famous woman.

 

ESL III Through TOEFL

 

6.         Parts of a Book Vocabulary (Intermediate and Advanced)identify the title page, the author, the preface, the introduction,  the index, the contents/table of contents (including the chapters, units, lessons, etc.), the glossary, the spine, the number of pages (in a chapter, in a book, in a lesson, etc.), the front cover, the back cover, the inside front cover, the publisher, the date of publication, the bibliography, the glossary, etc.   

 

7.         Information Formatting or Presentation—identify formats such as dialogue, sentences, paragraphs, exercise, reading passage, workbook/handbook,  pictures, illustrations, drawings, charts and tables, magazine, newspaper, article, etc.  Also, reference and cross-reference reference, cross-reference, footnote, endnote, bibliography, source, and citation, etc. 

 

8.         Proverbs-- Borrow a proverb dictionary from the Library.  Ask students to take turns looking up a proverb, write a paragraph in which they cite the proverb and describe its meaning, and report on their research to the class. 

 

9.         NorthStar Research TopicsNorthStar builds information literacy skills into some of the "Research Topic" activities at the end of each unit that require students to do guided research and make presentations based on the research.  Students are always given specific directions to guide their research and asked specific questions to guide their presentations.  Some examples from ESL IV NorthStar Intermediate:   

 

  • In Unit 1, students look for magazine ads that illustrate advertising's use of emotional appeals and in Unit 8, they use a magazine picture of someone who dresses in a certain way to interpret what they clothes say about the person. 
  • In Unit 2, students research a sport; in Unit 3, they research a type of fraud; in Unit 7, they research jokes; and in Unit 10, they research specific marriage topics.  

 

ESL VI Through TOEFL

 

10.        Identity Standard Cataloguing Publication Data--Use the "Library of Congress Cataloguing-in-Publication Data" at the beginning each text on the page.  All books are catalogued in the United States in a similar manner, whether in a card catalog or in an automated electronic catalog.  Explain what each part of the catalog information refers to.  Ask students to find corresponding information in another book they have with them and in a book in the Spanish-American Institute Library online catalog. 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Introduction to Multi-Media Resources

 

 

 

Tapes, CDs, Teacher’s Guides, Manuals, and Workbooks.

 The Spanish-American Institute has an extensive collection of print, audio, and video material available for ESL teachers to supplement classroom instruction.  Audio-visual teaching materials and teacher’s guides may be checked out directly from the Bookstore. 

 

Testing Material and Test Generating Software

 

Print and Listening Tests--WorldView and NorthStar Teachers Manuals contain print tests and companion Listening test CDS correlated to textbook units.  . 

 

Test Generating SoftwareThey also have test generating software on CD.  The software allows teachers to create and customize tests based on unit material.  Teachers can print out their own tests instead of waiting for a copy of the Teachers Manual and then waiting for the test material to be Xeroxed.

 

If you would like an introduction to using test generating software, please see Dr. Prager. 

 

NorthStar Unit DVDs, Teacher Guides, and Student Video Worksheets. 

NorthStar DVDs contain thematic video material correlated to each textbook units’ material.  Listening and Speaking and Reading texts share the same DVD presentation. 

 

Teacher Guides--Teacher video guides are available with each video unit’s vocabulary, audioscripts, and teaching activities. 

 

Student Video Worksheets.   Teachers are encouraged to use the Student Video Worksheets available for each NorthStar video presentation.  They contain guided activities to be used during and after video viewing.  Worksheet activities can easily be written on the board.  A good video lesson would include one or more days of work using Student Video Worksheet previewing, mid-viewing, and post-viewing vocabulary, discussion, and writing activities. 

 

See page        for a sample NorthStar Student Video Worksheet. 

 

Worldview and NorthStar Teacher's Manuals and Testing Materials. 

Two copies of the Teacher's Manuals for each level are available in the Bookstore. The Manuals contain teaching suggestions, expansion activities, and answer keys. 

 

The Manuals have companion listening tests and testing questions.  The listening test should be given at the end of each NorthStar unit so that students can see how much progress they have made. 

 

Call Numbers and Barcodes.

 For teacher convenience, the next section contains a complete list of the above materials with their Library call numbers and barcodes. 

 

 

 


Call Numbers and Barcodes

 

Teacher’s Manuals, Achievement Tests, & Dictionary CDs

by ESL Level

 

 

Level

Item

Format

Call No.

Barcode

all levels

Longman’s Dictionary of American English Teacher’s Companion Workbook

 

Book

 

TM23

 

0000348

all levels

Longman’s Dictionary of American English CD-ROM

CD

CD23

0000349

ESL 1

Worldview 1 Teacher’s Edition

Book

TM10.1

0000853

ESL 1

Worldview 1 Teacher’s Edition, copy 2

Book

TM10.3

0000899

ESL 1

Worldview 1 Teacher’s Resource Book

Book

TM10.2

0000851

ESL 1

Worldview 1 Teacher’s Resource Book, copy 2

Book

TM10.4

0000900

ESL 1

Worldview 1, Testing Audio CD, copy 1

CD

A22.4

0000868

ESL 1

Worldview 1, Testing Audio CD, copy 2

CD

A22.5

0000901

ESL 1

WorldView 1&2 TestGenTestBank

CD

A22.6

A22.7

0000902

0000952

ESL 1

WorldView 1 Student Audio CD

CD

A22.9

 

 

ESL 2

NorthStar Introductory  L & S Teacher’s Manuals, 2 copies

 

Books

TM1

TM2

0000783

0000782

 

ESL 2

NorthStar Introductory  L & S Achievement Tests, 2 copies

audio cassettes

A18.5

A18.6

0000781

0000780

 

ESL 3

NorthStar Basic/Low Intermediate L & S Teacher’s Manual, 2 copies

 

Books

TM5

TM6

0000835

0000806

 

ESL 3

NorthStar Basic/Low Intermediate L & S Achievement Tests, 2 copies

 

CDs

A19.1 & A19.2

0000820

0000834

ESL 4, TOEFL

NorthStar Intermediate Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT

Book

 

TM22.1

0000330

 

ESL 4

NorthStar Intermediate L & S Teacher’s Manual, 3 copies 

 

Books

TM3

TM4

TM4.2

0000830

0000776

0000337

 

ESL 4

NorthStar Intermediate L & S Achievement Tests, 3 copies

 

CDs

A18.7

A18.8

A18.9

0000803

0000817

0000329

ESL 5, Bus.Eng., TOEFL

NorthStar High Intermediate Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT

Book

TM22.2

0000331

 

ESL 5

NorthStar High Intermediate L & S Teacher’s Manual, 2 copies 

 

Books

TM5

TM6

0000797

0000798

ESL 5

NorthStar High Intermediate L & S Achievement Tests, 3 copies 

 

CDs

A20.1

A20.2

A20.11

0000822

0000858

0000897

Bus. Eng.

NorthStar High Intermediate R & W TestGen

CD

A20.18

0000053

ESL 6

NorthStar Advanced L & S Teacher’s Manual and Achievement Tests  (2 copies)

 

Books

TM11.1

TM11.2

0000948

0000938

ESL 6

NorthStar Advanced L&S Achievement Tests (2 copies)

 

CDs

A21.8

A21.9

0000922

0000923

 

 

 

 

 

ESL 6, ARW, TOEFL

NorthStar Advanced Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT

Book

TM22.3

0000332

Business English

NorthStar High Intermediate R&W Teacher’s Manual and Achievement Tests

 

Book

 

TM9.1

 

0000860

Business English

NorthStar High Intermediate R&W Writing Activity Book

 

Book

 

TM9.2

 

0000863

 

ARW

NorthStar Advanced R&W Test Generator and QuizMaster

CD

A21.3

A21.15

0000843

0000943

ARW

NorthStar Advanced R&W Writing Activity Book)

Book

TM8

0000845

ESL 6, ARW, TOEFL

NorthStar Advanced Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT

Book

TM22.3

0000332

TOEFL

TOEFL Next Generation iBT (2nd ed.), student CD

CD

A 24

 

 

 

VIDEO

Videotapes, DVDs, & Companion Resources

 

Key:  V=videotape, DVD=DVD, VB=companion resource material

 

Title

 

Format

 

Call No.

 

Barcode

 

Basic English Grammar by Video

 

V1.1

0000473

 

 

V1.2

0000474

Be Sensible:  Don’t Drive Yourself to Distraction

VHS

V46

0000812

Blind Date

 

V2

0000631

Breaking the Code: . . .Arabidopsis Genome

 

V24

0000403

Children of A Lesser God

 

V13

0000442

A Coalminer’s Daughter

 

V12

0000450

Dedicated To Service: A Career in Veterinary Medicine (see companion CD and resource material)

 

video

 

V47

 

0000894

Today’s Veterinarian

booklet

VB47

0000885

Diary of Anne Frank

 

V17

0000440

Down the Street & Around. . . World

 

V29&32

0000049

Easy Accent

 

V18

0000452

Electric Guitar

video

V44

0000795

   Electric Guitar Teacher’s Guide

booklet

VB44

0000796

Electrical Safety Tips with Safety Man

VHS

V30

0000048

Electrical Safety Tips with Safety Man, copy 3

VHS

V40

0000840

English Plus

 

V4

0000634

Face:  A Portrait (Appreciating Differences)

VHS

booklet

V49

VB49

0000327

0000328

Follow Me To San Francisco

 

V5

0000453

 

Book

VB5

0000276

The Fed Today

VHS

V48

0000876

Future Is Ours . . . So Now What?

 

V32

0000046

Lewis Latimer:  Renaissance Man (African-American Inventor)

 

 

V36

 

0000827

   Teacher’s Resource Guide

 

VB36

 

Mr. Jelly Belly’s Factory Tour

 

V31

0000057

Master Your Future: . . .Financial Responsibility

 

 

V23

 

0000405

Master Your Future: . . .Financial Responsibility, 2nd copy

 

 

V48

 

0000839

The Milagro Beanfield Wars

 

V15

0000454

New Glasses, New Life

 

V28

0000049

NorthStar Advanced DVD (ESL 6 & ARW) (3 copies)

DVD

V46

V46.2

V46.3

0000846

0000928

0000346

NorthStar Advanced DVD Teacher’s Guide & Video Activity Worksheets  (ESL 6 & ARW)

 

Booklet

 

VB46

 

0000847

NorthStar Basic/Low Intermediate Video (ESL 3)

 

DVD

 

V42

 

0000776

 NorthStar Basic/Low Intermediate DVD Teacher’s Guide & Video Activity Worksheets (ESL 3)

 

Booklet

 

VB42

 

0000792

NorthStar High Intermediate Video (ESL 5)

 

DVD

 

V45

 

0000808

 NorthStar High Intermediate DVD Teacher’s Guide & Video Activity Worksheets (ESL 5)

Booklet

VB45

0000849

NorthStar Intermediate DVD (ESL 4), 2 copies

DVD

V41

V41.2

0000790

0000347

 NorthStar Intermediate DVD Teacher’s Guide & Video Activity Worksheets (ESL 4)

Booklet

VB41

0000805

Open For Business

Tape 1

V6.1

0000457

 

Tape 2

V6.2

0000456

Operation Decoration

 

V30

0000048

 

Book

VB6

0000277

Perfect English

 

V7

0000451

Reinventing the Wheel:  Continuing Evolution  of the Bicycle

 

 

V38

 

0000813

   Teacher’s Resource Guide

 

VB38

0000829

Saving a Species:  Sea Turtle Story, Rhino Story, Manatee Story

 

 

V34

 

0000771

  Endangered  Species Teacher’s Guide

Book

VB34

0000786

Science in Action for Conservation

 

V36

0000799

She’s Got It!:  Women Inventors . . .

 

V37

0000814

   Teacher’s Resource Guide

book

VB37

0000774

Side By Side TV:  Level 1, Part A

Part A

V8.1A

0000466

 

Part A book

 

VB8.1A

 

0000241

Side By Side TV:  Level 1, Part B

Part B

V8.1B

0000465

 

Part B book

 

VB8.1B

 

0000242

Side By Side TV:  Level 2, Part A

Part A

V8.2A

0000463

 

Part A book

 

VB8.2A

 

0000243

Side By Side TV:  Level 2, Part B

Part B

V8.2B

0000464

 

Part B book

 

VB8.2B

 

0000244

Sound! Light! Edison!

video

V43

0000784

    Edison Invents (teacher’s guide)

booklet

VB43

0000794

Sunkist:  Growing the Future

 

V35

0000785

 

book

VB21

0000239

To Kill A Mockingbird 

 

V14

0000449

True Voices:  Basic Level

Basic

V9.1

0000443

 

Basic book

 

VB9.1

 

0000268

True Voices:  Level 1

Level 1

V9.2

0000444

 

Level 1 book

VB9.2

0000269

 

True Voices:  Level 2

Level 2

V9.3

0000445

 

Level 2 book

VB9.3

0000270

 

True Voices:  Level 3

Level 3

V9.4

0000446

 

Level 3 book

VB9.4

0000271

True Voices:  Level 4

Level 4

V9.5

0000447

 

Level 4 book

 

VB9.5

 

0000272

UL Appliance Safety Quiz

 

V25

0000050

Understanding Business and Personal Law: Cases From the People’s Court.

 

 

V10

 

0000448

Your Life in Your Hands. Part 1

Tape 1

V11.1

0000458

Your Life in Your Hands. Part 2

Tape 2

V11.2

0000455

 

Book

VB11

0000278

We All Came to America.

 

V16

0000441

Worldview 1 DVD

DVD

V47

0000850

Worldview 1 Video Guide…..

book

VB47

0000848

 

 

 


AUDIO

 

Key:   A=audio tape, AB=companion book, CD=CD, REF=material available in Library

 

Title

Tape

Number

or Format

Call No.

Barcode

 

American Accent Training

1

A1.1

0000262

 

2

A1.2

0000263

 

3

A1.3

0000264

 

4

A1.4

0000265

 

5

A1.5

0000266

 

book

AB1

0000267

The American Accent Guide

1

A4.1

0000482

 

2

A4.2

0000483

 

3

A4.3

0000484

 

4

A4.4

0000485

 

5

A4.5

0000486

 

6

A4.6

0000487

 

7

A4.7

0000488

 

8

A4.8

0000489

 

book

AB4

0000257

American English Pronunciation:  It’s No Good Unless It’s Understood

 

1

A2.1

 

 

2

A2.2

 

 

3

A2.3

 

 

4

A2.4

 

 

5

A2.5

 

 

book

AB2

 

American English Pronunciation Program

1

A3.1

0000550

 

2

A3.2

0000551

 

3

A3.3

0000552

 

4

A3.4

0000553

 

5

A3.5

0000554

 

6

A3.6

0000556

 

book

AB3

0000635

Dedication to Service: A Career in Veterinary Service

 

CD

A23

0000875

Hummingbird

1

A5.1

0000490

 

2

A5.2

0000549

 

book

AB5

0000279

Let’s Speak Business English

1

A12.1

0000556

 

2

A12.2

0000557

 

book

AB12

0000260

NorthStar Advanced Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT (units 1-6), 2 copies

CD

A21.12

A21.14

0000345

0000342

NorthStar Advanced Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT (units 7-10), 2 copies

CD

A21.13

A21.15

0000344

0000343

NorthStar Advanced L & S (units 1-5), (3 copies)

 

CDs

A21.4

A21.5

A20.10

0000925

0000929

0000934

NorthStar Advanced L & S (units 6-10), (4 copies)

 

CDs

A21.6

A21.7

A20.11

0000927

0000026

0000935

NorthStar Advanced R&W (units 1-5)

(for ARW)

audio CD

 

A21.1

 

0000841

NorthStar Advanced R&W (units 6-10)

(for ARW)

audio CD

 

A21.2

 

0000842

NorthStar Basic/Low Intermediate L & S (listening passages 1-5), 2 copies(ESL 3)

CD

tape

A19.5

A19.9

0000807

0000870

NorthStar Basic/Low Intermediate L & S (listening passages 1-5) (ESL 3)

 

tape

 

A19.3

 

0000779

NorthStar Basic/Low Intermediate L & S (listening passages 6-10) (ESL 3)

 

tape

 

A19.4

 

0000793

NorthStar High Intermediate Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT (units 1-6), 2 copies

CD

A20.12

A20.14

0000340

0000936

NorthStar High Intermediate Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT (units 7-10), 1 copy

CD

A20.13

0000341

NorthStar High Intermediate L & S CD, units 1-5 (ESL 5)

 

CD

 

A20.3

 

0000809

NorthStar High Intermediate L & S CD, units 1-5 (ESL 5)

 

CD

 

A20.9

 

0000879

NorthStar High Intermediate L & S CD, units 6-10 (ESL 5)

 

CD

 

A20.10

 

0000888

NorthStar High Intermediate L & S CD, units 6-10 (ESL 5)

 

CD

 

A20.4

 

0000861

NorthStar High Intermediate L & S Audio, units 1-5 (ESL 5)

 

tape

 

A20.5

 

0000810

NorthStar High Intermediate L & S Audio, units 6-10 (ESL 5)

 

tape

 

A20.6

 

0000811

NorthStar High Intermediate R&W CD, units 1-5 (Business English), 2 copies

 

CD

 

A20.7

A20.15

 

0000865

0000939

NorthStar High Intermediate R&W CD, units 6-10 (3 copies)

CD

A20.8

A20.16

A20.17

0000866

0000937

0000940

NorthStar Intermediate Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT (units 1-6), 2 copies

CD

A18.10

A18.12

0000339

0000931

NorthStar Intermediate Building Skills for the TOEFL iBT (units 7-10), 2 copies

CD

A18.11

A18.13

0000932

0000933

NorthStar Intermediate L & S (listening passages 6-10), 2 copies, (ESL 3)

CD

tape

A19.6

A19.0

0000821

0000867

NorthStar Intermediate L & S (listening passages 1-5), 2 copies,  (ESL 4)

 

CD

A18.1

A19.7

0000790

0000838

NorthStar Intermediate L & S (listening passages 6-10) (ESL 4)

 

CD

 

A18.2

 

0000804

NorthStar Intermediate L & S (listening passages 1-5) (ESL 4)

 

tape

 

A18.3

 

0000833

NorthStar Intermediate L & S (listening passages 6-10) (ESL 4)

 

tape

 

A18.4

 

0000778

NorthStar Introductory L&S (listening passages 1-5) (ESL 2) , 2 copies

 

CD

 

A17.3

A17.7

 

0000859

0000877

NorthStar Introductory L&S (listening passages 1-5) (ESL 2) (original copy kept in Dr. Prager’s office)

CD

(A17.5)

(0000886)

NorthStar Introductory L&S (listening passages 6-10) (ESL 2), 3 copies

CD

 

A17.4

A17.8

0000869

0000887

NorthStar Introductory L&S (listening passages 6-9) (ESL 2) (original copy kept in Dr. Prager’s office)

 

CD

 

(A17.6)

 

(0000896)

NorthStar Introductory L&S (listening passages 1-5), 2 copies (ESL 2)

 

tape

A17.1

A17.2

000043

000045

NorthStar Introductory L&S (listening passages 6-10), 2 copies (ESL 2)

 

tape

 

A17.2

000042

000044

NorthStar Introductory L&S Achievement Tests, 2 copies (ESL 2)

CD

tape

A18.5

A18.6

0000781

0000782

Pronounce It Perfectly in English

1

A6.1

0000475

 

2

A6.2

0000476

 

3

A6.3

0000477

 

book

AB6

0000258

Side By Side:  Level 1

1A

A8.1A

0000479

 

1B

A8.1B

0000480

Side By Side:  Level 2

2A

A8.2A

0000481

 

2B

A8.2B

0000482

TOEFL, Introductory Course (1996) 

tape 1

A15.1

0000230

 

tape 2

A15.2

0000231

 

tape 3

A15.3

0000232

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2005)

retired; copies in Dr. Prager’s office

CD 1

(2 copies)

A22.1

A23.1

0000906

0000914

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2005)

retired; copies in Dr. Prager’s office

CD 2

(2 copies)

A22.2

A23.2

0000907

0000915

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2005)

retired; copies in Dr. Prager’s office

CD 3

(2 copies)

A22.3

A23.3

0000908

0000916

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2005)

retired; copies in Dr. Prager’s office

CD 4

(2 copies)

A22.4

A23.4

0000909

0000917

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2005)

retired; copies in Dr. Prager’s office

CD 5

(2 copies)

A22.5

A23.5

0000910

0000918

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2005)

retired; copies in Dr. Prager’s office

CD 6

(2 copies)

A22.6

A23.6

0000911

0000919

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2005)

retired; copies in Dr. Prager’s office

CD 7

(2 copies)

A22.7

A23.7

0000912

0000920

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2005)

retired; copies in Dr. Prager’s office

CD 8

(2 copies)

A22.8

A23.8

0000913

0000921

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed), Student CD

CD

A24

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 1

(2 copies)

A24.1

A24.2

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 2

(2 copies)

A24.3

A24.4

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 3

(2 copies)

A24.5

A24.6

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 4

(2 copies)

A24.7

A24.8

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 5

(2 copies)

A24.9

A24.10

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 6

(2 copies)

A24.11

A24.12

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 7

(2 copies)

A24.13

A24.14

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 8

(2 copies)

A24.15

A24.16

 

TOEFL, Next Generation iBT (2nd ed)

 

CD 9

(2 copies)

A24.17

A24.18

 

Worldview 1, CD 1, unit 1-review unit 1

1

A22.1

0000854

WorldView 1, Student Audio CD

1

A22.9

0000954

Worldview 1, CD 2, unit 9-World of Music 3

2

A22.2

0000856

Worldview 1, CD 3, unit 21-World of Music 4

3

A22.3

0000857


Video Lessons

 

Critical Thinking Skills and Language Development in Video Lessons

 

A.  Video Lessons

B.  Model for Video Lesson—NorthStar Video Teaching Guide and Student Video Activity Worksheets

1.       Prediction

2.       Focusing

3.       Comprehension

4.       Discussion

5.      Writing

C.  Adapting the NorthStar Method for Other Video Lessons:  Pears and A Laundry Epic

________________________________________________________________________

 

A.  Video Lessons  The video is never the lesson!    Video lessons involve consideration of the following. 

 

Critical thinking.  When thinking with a new language, students develop brain pathways that help make the language their own.  Critical thinking is an important feature of the WorldView and NorthStar method.  Critical thinking is as important in using WorldView and NorthStar companion videos as it is in using the textbooks. 

 

Higher order language skills proceed from higher order critical thinking.  Higher order language skills can only proceed from higher order critical thinking.  When students move from composing simple sentences to complex sentences, they proceed to combine and express thoughts that are linked together in a particular way.  For example, in the sentence, “I like ice cream because it tastes good,” they are linking together the ideas of “liking” and “tasting,” using a main clause and a dependent or subordinate one. 

 

Moving from lower to higher order thinking and language skills.  In every WorldView and NorthStar unit, students move from lower to higher order thinking and language skills.  Typically, thinking and language skills progress from the less structured and concrete to the more structured and more abstract: 

 

q       from general prediction,

q       to comprehension of the main idea,

q       to comprehension of details,

q       to inference and analogy,

q       to independent language production in speaking and writing.    

 

All ESL video lessons should incorporate the same progression in language skills development.  Remember!  The video is not the reason for the lesson.  It is a vehicle for language development.  Spend a small amount of time on viewing and a lot on language skills development. 

 

NorthStar Student Video Worksheets provide an excellent model for developing video lessons. 

 

B.  Model for Video Lesson—NorthStar Video Teaching Guide and Student Video Activity Worksheets

 

Purpose of NorthStar Video Lessons.   The video is used as a platform for using English.  It is not for entertainment or passing the time.  With NorthStar, the video segment is used at or near the end of the unit.  It presents the unit topic in another way, helping students to use what they have learned in the unit to create with language in a different context.  . 

 

Activities for NorthStar Method Video Lesson:  5 Sets of Activities.  NorthStar Video lesson activities always move from structured to much more independent use of language.  The physical act of viewing a NorthStar or any other video selection should take no more than 5 to 10 minutes of classtime, at the very most.

 

Each video lesson contains 5 sets of activities in the following order.  The lesson can be done in one or more class periods (with or without the  option of homework or in-class writing the next day):

 

6.       Prediction

7.       Focusing

8.       Comprehension

9.       Discussion

10.  Writing

 

1.  Prediction Activities for NorthStar Video Lessons (c. 5 min.) 

 

q       Teacher briefly explains the topic in the video segment.

q       Teacher frames one general question related to the topic for student prediction activity.  For example: 

o        What do you think ________________is?  (or)

o        What is the first thing you might say to someone when ____________? (or)

o        How does ______________affect us?

 

2.  Focusing Activities (c.  5-10 minutes to watch video and c. 5 minutes to answer focus questions.)  Teachers give students one or more factual questions for them to think about when watching the video.  For example:

§         What are ____________made of?

§         Who did________________?

§         When does __________________?

§         How does_________________?

§         Why did_________________?

 

3.  Comprehension  Activities (c. 10-15 minutes).  Comprehension should involve more than one set activities related to the topic.  The activities should require students to "work" with words and structure in some way, such as answering simple questions, completing sentences given a choice of words or terms, selecting appropriate vocabulary from a list and inserting it in sentences, correcting errors in sentences, etc.  For example:

 

§         Lower level students answer true/false questions, then explain why the answer is true or false.

§         Lower level students pick a group of words from a list that best describes a topic from the video, then explain why their word choices are appropriate.

§         Lower level students complete sentences by inserting the best choice from a list. 

§         Students answer a short series of "wh" questions progressing from "what" to "why" in one-sentence answers.

 

4.  Discussion Activities (c. 10 or more minutes).  Students discuss questions provided by teacher.  The questions should progress from something in the video to something related to their own lives and observations. 

 

5.  Writing Activities.    (Option one:  use remaining class time to set up assignment for homework or classwork the next day.  Option two:  use the remaining 10 minutes in this class period to have students write now.)

 

Students write about an assigned topic related to the video segment.  The writing topic should be structured so that it guides the students' development of the topic. 

 

Note how most of the following formats can be adjusted for lower and higher level students. For example, lower level students might write a list of complete or incomplete sentences or

one paragraph supported by one or two examples.  More advanced students might write more paragraphs supported by more details and examples. 

§         Make a list of ____________________.

§         Invent a new__________and write an advertisement for it.  Think about the ingredients or materials you will use, your target market, and one/two/three reasons why people should buy your product.

§         Write about a popular______________in your country.  Do you think that _________helps the people who live there?  In what ways?  Give one/two/three specific examples to support your ideas.

§         In the video you saw_______________.  Write about a situation you experienced in which you ______________.  Explain what you or other people could have done to___________________.

§         Do you agree or disagree with the expression: "   __________."? Write one/two/three paragraphs in which you give your opinion and provide at least one/two/three specific examples to support your opinion. 

 

C.  Adapting the NorthStar Method for Other Video Lessons:  Pears and A Laundry Epic.  The following discusses how faculty members might adapt the NorthStar video lesson method with attention to appropriate levels of critical thinking for lower and for higher level ESL classes using two very different videos. 

 

Example 1:  Pears:  A Taste for All Seasons

ESL 3 and above

10 min. video

V39

 

 Pears:  A Taste for All Season contains gorgeous footage of Pacific Northwest forests, wildlife, mountains, and farms while it explains the ideal growing conditions for Pacific Northwest pears and their preparation for the market. 

 

Pears can be adapted to different ESL levels. 

 

Critical Thinking and Language Skills:  Lower levels can discuss different fruits in their home countries and the USA, the colors of fruits, their shapes, their flavors, etc.  They can also reference location (East, West, Western, etc.), seasons, and climate. 

 

More advanced students should be working at a higher level of critical thinking and language use.  In keeping with their higher order language-learning objectives, ARW and TOEFL classes should be asked more "how" and "why" questions than "what" questions.

 

Compare the language and critical thinking skills needed to answer the following "what" and "why" questions about the Pears video: 

 

1.  What three conditions produce the best pears?  The answer requires "knowing" three simple facts:  water, soil, and climate.  "Knowing" is considered the lowest level of critical thinking.  These simple facts can be stated in a simple sentence.

 

2.  Why does the Pacific Northwest produce such good pears?  The answer requires a higher level of abstraction.  Students must establish a cause and effect relationship between the Pacific Northwest's water, soil, and climate and the pears' quality?

 

"Explaining why” is considered a higher level of critical thinking than merely "knowing." Consequently, "explaining" also usually requires more complex sentence structure.  

 

Description Skills:  In every video lesson, students should be required to do some descriptive writing based on the video.  Lower level students might be asked to describe simple colors, shapes, and flavors.  Upper level students, however, might be asked to use simile and metaphor that implies the comparison between two different qualities:  e.g., buttery, creamy, it tastes like _________etc. 

 

Comparing and Contrasting Skills:  In every video lesson, students should be required to compare and contrast at an appropriate level.  Lower level students might be asked to compare and contrast any two different pears or fruits for color and shape.  Higher-level students might be asked to compare two ways that fruit is brought to the marketplace in their home countries and in the USA.

 

Example 2:   A Laundry Epic:  Gone With the Wash

ESL 4 and above

23 min.

in

4 sections

V40

VB40

 

             A Laundry Epic:  Gone With the Wash uses a humorous mystery story to illustrate proper laundry techniques.  The film might be called "The Case of the Stolen Necklace."  It has all the stereotypical components of an old-fashioned detective story, complete with a detective in a trench coat, an assistant with a magnifying glass, a spoiled rich girl with stuffy servants, relatives with bad motives, etc. 

 

Do not show the entire video in one session.  Select only one of the four lesson plans in the teacher's resource guide for any single viewing session.   

 

Each of the four lesson plans can be adjusted to different learning outcomes for different ESL levels. 

 

Lesson 3, for example, "This is the Way We Wash Our Clothes," provides an opportunity for lower level students to list the clothes they wear in a week and place them into different categories.  It also provides an opportunity for fieldwork such as finding directions on a laundry product and reporting on it in class. (This might make a nice homework warm-up assignment for the night before the video is shown.) 

 

Lesson 4, "Don't Let Energy Savings Go Down the Drain," consists of 5 different paragraphs, each of which ends with a question.  At the end of the video lesson using Lesson 4, teachers may want to dictate one or more of these paragraphs and then ask students to answer the question in a paragraph or more.   

 

Upper level students might be asked to talk about how different genre communicate meaning.  They might be asked to explain why the detective story genre is effective here.  They might be asked to describe other genres (such as an "epic," used humorously in the title).  An advanced class might also be broken into small groups, each retelling the story in a different genre:  e.g., as a memo, as a news report, as a poem, as a love story, as an historical account, etc.   
 

WorldView and NorthStar Videos

 

WorldView and NorthStar videos are keyed to each textbook unit.  The video and the Student Activity Worksheets for each video segment employ principles of good practice in video lessons. 

 

The instructional support material for using these videos includes: 

 

q       Teacher’s video guides and/or manuals, including audio scripts of the video material.

q       Student Activity Worksheets.

 

Video DVD Format:  When checking out the DVD.  teachers should also request the companion video worksheets and teaching guide.  Directions for using the video material are found in the Video DVD Guide.  The Guide also contains the background, vocabulary, and script for each video segment.   

 

Student Video Activity Worksheets:  Each unit video segment has a companion

student activity worksheet.  Students should do all of the worksheet exercises.  Teachers can easily copy worksheet questions and exercises on the board. 

 

Each video worksheet is divided into the following sections: 

 

q       Predict.

q       Focus.

q       Comprehension. 

q       Discussion.  

q       Writing. 

 

Time on Task:  Spend at Least Two Days on Each WorldView and NorthStar Video Lessons:  In keeping with the NorthStar method, video lessons move students from more guided and controlled  exercises to more independent activity.  For example, at the beginning, they might merely identify the topic described in the video.  By the end, they should be able write about the topic independently. 

 

Optimally, it should take, therefore, at least two days to complete any WorldView and NorthStar video lesson.  The first day might be spent on previewing activities, viewing, and general discussion, and basic focus and comprehension activities.  The second day might be spent on more advanced discussion and writing. 

 

Lesson Planning and Teacher’s Role:  WorldView and NorthStar provide most of the material needed for video lesson planning.  After consulting the Teacher’s Guides, teachers can use the Student Activity Worksheets for class activities.  The teacher’s major role is to bring students to the point where they can communicate about the video topic independently, in speaking and in writing.  


 

Thematic Video Collections

 

The Spanish-American Institute has a collection of instructional videos, many of which can be clustered thematically.  These videos were developed for general classroom use at different grade levels.  Since they were not designed for ESL students, in particular, ESL teachers must adapt the videos for the ESL classroom: 

 

  1. Consult the teacher’s guides and other supplementary material that may come with the videos. 
  2. Use only a small portion of each video for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson. 
  3. Employ other principles of good practice in preparing ESL video lessons.

 

The videos discussed below have been clustered into the following themes: 

 

q       Electrical Safety

q       Volunteerism and Service

q       Invention and Innovation

q       Environment

q       Miscellaneous

 

 

Electrical Safety Videos

 

Electrical Safety Tips With Safety Man

Operation Decoration                                          

UL Appliance Safety Quiz

 

Spanish-American Institute has three videos that deal with using electricity safely in the home.  The videos communicate valuable life-saving information.  Most fires in the United States take place in the home where faulty electrical wiring or incorrect electrical use causes fires. 

 

The electrical safety videos are, therefore, valuable for international students because they: 

 

q       introduce them  to the very real problem in the United States of safe use of home appliances, electrical outlets, extension cords, etc.; and

q       provide them with the opportunity to listen to native speakers who speak quickly and with native accents.   

 

 

Electrical Safety Tips With Safety Man (1993)

ESL 3-6

Call Number: V30

13 minutes

 

Electrical Safety Tips With Safety Man describes electrical hazards in the home through the eyes and voice of a young girl, Melinda, who had learned about electrical safety from Safety Man at school. 

 

For all ESL 3-6 students, the video segment can be used to:

 

  • learn about safety in the home (unsafe use of electricity is the one of major accidental cause of death in the American home) and
  • develop listening skills from hearing native speakers using natural everyday speech, including teenage slang. 

 

For ESL 3-4, the segment can also be used to: 

 

  • review vocabulary related to rooms in the house, furniture, members of a family, etc. 

 

Vocabulary:  wires, shock, hazard, safety, power, lifesaver, electrically charged, electrocution, appliances, cords, water and electricity don't mix, plug, unplug

 

 

Operation Decoration (1995)

ESL3-6

Call Number: V30

12 minutes

 

Operation Decoration (1995) is on the same tape as Electrical Safety Tips With Safety Man.  Rick, the sloppy teenage brother from Electrical Safety Tips, has sneaked downstairs after everyone else went to sleep to see what kind of presents he has under the Christmas tree.  Safety Man/Safety Claus comes down the chimney and turns off all of the decoration lights.  Melinda joins them and they go over the decorations to make sure they were safe and safely used.  Rick could care less.  All he wants is for them to disappear so he can go back to looking for his presents.  (Safety Claus gives him a lump of coal, reflecting an old English tradition that bad children get a lump of coal instead of presents at Christmas).  Safety Claus makes sure that they understand the dangers from electrical decorations, fireplaces, heaters, dry trees, and other sources of accidents in the home in the winter. 

 

The segment ends with review questions and choice of answers written on the screen. 

 

The video segment can be used to teach about electrical safety as well as to discuss traditional stories from different cultures about giving presents at different holidays. 

 

Vocabulary:  bribery, bulb, socket, cord, loose wires, UL mark (Underwriter's Laboratory), overloaded extension cords, wattage, electric shock, smoke detectors, fire extinguishers

 

 

UL Appliance Safety Quiz

ESL 5 and above

Call Number: V25

25 minutes

 

UL Appliance Safety Quiz was produced by the Underwriters Laboratory (UL) to teach consumers how to use electrical appliances safely.  The video provides life-saving consumer information while giving students the opportunity to listen to the voices of different commentators who speak with general American accents. 

 

The video is organized around 13 questions.   Each question introduces a new safety concern.  Each question and its three possible answers is spoken and also written on the video screen.  After students hear and read the questions and answers, a safety expert explains the safety issues involved.  Students are then told which of the three answers for that question is correct.

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

Vocabulary:  safety, appliance, hazards, electric shock, electrocution, moist, moisture, live (as in electricity), grounding, lethal, plug, unplug, circuit (electrical), warranty, 3-prong, worn, outlet, lightweight cord, heavy duty cord, UL mark


 Volunteerism Videos

 

Don't Be Blind to Diabetes 

New Glasses, New Life:  Share Your Vision, Recycle for Sight 

Down the Street  & Around the World

The Future Is Ours . . . So Now What?

 

These short videos revolve around the work of Lions Club International.  The video material is best suited to advanced ESL classes.  However, the material can be used with ESL 6 students with careful and extensive pre-viewing preparation.

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

Background:  Approximately 1.4 million people around the world belong to Lions Clubs.  The Lions Club motto is "We Serve."  Lions Club members volunteer their time for humanitarian causes, especially causes that assist the blind and the visually impaired.  The Lions believe that by volunteering to help others, ordinary people can do extraordinary things.

 

This following brief description of the first three video segments illustrates this philosophy. 

 

  1. Don't Be Blind to Diabetes alerts people to the dangers of adult diabetes. 
  2. New Glasses, New Life:  Recycle for Sight describes how the Lions recycle donated used eyeglasses to provide vision care for people throughout the world.   
  3. Down the Street and Around the World describes how volunteers support programs for the blind, the visually impaired, at-risk youth, wildlife conservation, etc. around the world. 

 

Classroom Use:  Select a short portion of each video (5-10 min.) for in class viewing.  Introduce and summarize the rest of the video in previewing work.

 

Students will be better able to discuss each video segment if they are first introduced to:

 

§         the concept of service and volunteerism and   

§         the vocabulary of service and volunteerism (e.g., service, volunteer, mission, donate, helping hand, reaching out, community).

 

 

Don't Be Blind to Diabetes

ESL 6 with extensive preparation

ARW & TOEFL

20

 min.

Call No.: 

V27

 

Don't Be Blind to Diabetes  includes several brief interviews with English speakers from other countries. 

 

Previewing Activities The Day Before:  To help students get the most out of the film, introduce the general topic of diabetes and related vocabulary at least the day before the video class.  Explain that diabetes is a growing problem today because of increased sugar consumption and malnutrition.  Also explain that diabetes is the leading cause of adult blindness.  Tell students that the film will explain how diabetes can be diagnosed and treated.   

 

Helpful vocabulary has been grouped below by categories.  Words are not listed in the order in which they occur in the film. 

 

Vocabulary:  

diabetes (disease, type 1 and type 2 diabetes, juvenile diabetes, early stage of disease

sugar digestion (digestive system, glucose, pancreas, insulin)

vision (blind, blindness, visually impaired)

symptoms (fatigue, numbness of hands and feet, excessive thirst, excessive urination)

diagnosis (undiagnosed, undiagnosed consequences, complications)

treatment (insulin injection, lifestyle changes, exercise, diet)

consequences (kidney disease, coronary disease, stroke, crippled, handicapped)

causes (overweight, life-style, malnutrition, protein deficiency, sugar consumption)

 

ARW and TOEFL Classes:  Use the video as you would a long listening exercise like those used in TOEFL lectures.  Students should take notes.  Discussion should help students review the video material.  Assign a TOEFL type essay based on the video (e.g., explain why diabetes is a growing problem around the world). 

 

 

 New Glasses, New Life: 

Share Your Vision, Recycle for Sight

ESL 6 with extensive preparation

ARW & TOEFL

10

min

Call No.

V28

The video has attractive visuals and lightly accented English narration.  The narrator is a Mexican weaver from a poor rural community.  He represents  the thousands of people around the world who need prescription eyeglasses but can't afford them.  The video shows how the Lions Clubs International helps the weaver and others like him by providing eye examinations and recycled prescription eyeglasses. 

 

Down the Street & Around the World

ESL 6 with extensive preparation

ARW & TOEFL

16

min

Call No.

V29

 

Down the Street & Around the World is found on the same tape as New Glasses . . . described above. 

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity.

 

Make sure students understand that the video is more about volunteerism and service than it is about any particular program. In the words of one speaker, the Lions believe in helping others, one community at a time .  By volunteering, they believe that ordinary people can do extraordinary things.  Their programs include help for the blind and visually impaired, for at-risk youth, for wildlife conservation, for emergency rescue, and for families coping with HIV/AIDS.

 

Vocabulary:  making a positive difference, impact, crusade against blindness, potential to do service, helping hand, reaching out, at-risk kids, wildlife conservation, workshops, cross-section of people.

 

 

 

The Future Is Ours . . . So Now What? 

ESL 6 with extensive preparation

ARW & TOEFL

22 min

Call No.:

V32

 

The Future Is Ours . . . So Now What? is best suited to ARW and TOEFL classes.  However, the material can be used with ESL 6 students with very careful and extensive pre-viewing preparation. 

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

Summary:  The Future Is Ours . . . So Now What? documents the activities of six teens from the US and Canada whose experiences with volunteerism communicate the need for and rewards of service.  The video also presents comments, perspectives, and appeals from other participants.  The speakers speak quickly, using everyday language and different regional accents. 

 

Sequence of Classroom Use:  Students will be better able to discuss The Future Is Ours . . . So Now What? if they have viewed the other three videos first, in the order suggested by the December, 2002 memo. They should be familiar with the vocabulary and concepts explored in the other three videos before trying to do the advanced exercises suggested below.  

 

Sample Advanced Reading, Dictation, and/or Cloze Exercise:  Use the following passage for reading, dictation, and/or Cloze exercises. 

 

"Each period of history has seen the scope and substance of society's needs change.  Young people entering the 21st Century are forced to deal with the legacies left by earlier generations.  They confront problems of disability, poverty, ignorance, injustice, pollution, and many other social ills.  How they choose to address these issues will define them and, in turn, determine the legacy they will leave to their children. 

 

The word 'volunteer' comes from the Latin word meaning 'free will.'  Volunteers are active people willing to work at improving their communities.  More than 50 percent of teenagers in the United States participate in some form of service to their communities.  Examples of volunteerism include helping at a local food bank or pantry, coaching sports teams, tutoring younger students, singing in a community chorus, or helping a neighbor fix his or her home.  Students who volunteer find ways to make a difference.  They learn an important lesson about volunteering—that the point is not to fully resolve a problem but to take action. They also gain a sense of accomplishment and develop social and life skills that help them become better students and citizens.

 

For volunteers, service expands horizons by enlarging a sense of community.  Service helps people interact with others from different backgrounds.  It teaches teamwork.  Service may also make participants more aware of career possibilities and may bring them into contact with people in the community who can help them reach their career goals." 

 

Sample Discussion and Writing: 

 

  1. Explain the line:  "Young people entering the 21st Century are forced to deal with the legacies left by earlier generations."  Then provide a specific example of this legacy.
  2. Argue for or against the following statement:  "Volunteerism helps people shape the future." 
  3. Explain the following statements—
    • Volunteerism (service) expands horizons
    • Service can help further career goals

Do you agree with the video's title, "The Future is Ours—So Now What?"


Invention and Innovation Videos

Lewis Latimer:  renaissance man, African-American inventor

She's got it:  women inventors and their inspirations

Reinventing the wheel:  the continuing evolution of the bicycle

Sound, Light, Edison:  celebrating 150 years of invention

The electric guitar:  its makers and players

 

These videos document, interpret, and disseminate information about invention and innovation.  They demonstrate the central role that invention and innovation has played in US history. 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis Latimer:  renaissance man, African-American inventor (1848-1928)

      Teacher's resource guide

 

ESL 5 and above with extensive preparation

 

30 min.

V36

 

VB36

 

Lewis Latimer tells the story of an important African-American inventor.  The son of slaves, Latimer worked with Thomas Edison on the first practical invention of the incandescent electric light bulb.

 

Lewis Latimer is told with the help of puppets.  The puppets speak very rapidly with regional Southern and African-American accents and use very idiomatic language.  The video is, therefore, not recommended for students below ESL 5 and not recommended without prior class preparation about Lewis Latimer's life and his inventions.  The Teacher's resource guide contains useful material to help teachers prepare students. 

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

 

She's got it:  women inventors and their inspirations

      Teacher's resource guide

 

ESL 5 and above with preparation

 

29 min.

V37

 

VB37

 

Viewers will explore some of the barriers that American women inventors had to overcome to patent and to bring their inventions to market.  The Teacher's resource guide on p. 9 has some excellent questions for introductory discussion like naming something in your life that needs fixing or improving and then thinking of an invention that might help fix or improve it.  There is also a collection of short reading passages describing each women and her invention.

 

 

Reinventing the wheel:  the continuing evolution of the bicycle

   Teacher's resource guide

 

ESL  5 and above with preparation

 

45 min.

V38

 

VB38

 

Reinventing the wheel is much more than a history of the bicycle.  It is also a commentary on how the bicycle brought about significant social and industrial change in the United States. 

 

The bicycle freed ordinary people by providing a cheap means of independent transportation.  It contributed to better health by providing an acceptable form of exercise for men and women.  It helped to emancipate women, in particular, by allowing them to move independently, by providing them with physical exercise, and by leading to changes in their clothing styles. 

 

These themes are best viewed in several separate video lessons of 5-10 minutes each.  The teacher's resource guide contains reading passages, an historic timeline, pictures, and suggested activities.  As always, students should read, write, and speak as part of the video lesson(s). 

 

 

Sound, Light, Edison:  celebrating 150 years of invention (1997)

   Edison Invents:  Teacher's resource guide

 

ESL 3 and above with preparation

 

30 min.

close captioned

V43

 

VB43

 

Edison invented or contributed significantly to the development of the telegraph, the phonograph, the light bulb, movies, etc.  His inventions gave us electric lights in our homes and an entire system to produce and deliver electric power.  He was the first to record and play back sound—he actually started the recording industry.  He developed the first movie camera and produced the first movies.   He also created the first modern research laboratory complex and factory that recognized the importance of teamwork in creating new inventions and applications. 

 

Students will hear recordings from his first phonographs and see clips of his first movies.  The video divides easily into 3 sections—the history of his inventions, his contribution to electric lighting, and his "invention" factory and research site.  This last part introduces students to Lewis Latimer, an important African-American inventor who worked at the Edison labs.  (Lewis Latimer is the subject of the first video listed above.)

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

 

  The electric guitar:  its makers and players (2004)

  Electric Guitar:  Teacher's resource guide

 

ESL 4 and above with preparation

30 min.

close captioned

V44

 

VB44

Photograph of influential and popular guitars

The film shows how the electric guitar is used in several popular American music forms such as swing, jazz, country, and rock.  As "popular" music sought to reach larger audiences, guitar makers sought to develop ever-louder guitars that could be played before large crowds or with large bands and orchestras.  The electric guitar was the instrumental heart of rock and roll as it emerged in the 1950s and still is today. 

 

Most of the video is narrated and demonstrated by popular rock, country, and folk music musicians.  The first part of the film explores the development of the electric guitar from the acoustic (non-electric) guitar.  Skip the second part exploring the technology behind guitar building.  The teacher's resource guide contains reading passages well suited to advanced ESL students.

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity


 

 

Environmental Videos   

 

Sunkist:  Growing the Future 

Saving A Species

Science in Action for Conservation:  Understanding and Protecting Biodiversity Environmental Concerns and Policies (in The European Union)

 

The videos cover topics like:

 

  • farming, agri-business, and conservation (Sunkist; The European Union, Part 8, "Our Future, Our Choices;" Science in Action for Conservation);
  • biodiversity and species preservation (Saving a Species, The European Union, Part 8,  "Our Future, Our Choices;" Science in Action for Conservation; and
  • energy generation and the environment (The European Union, Part 9, "Renewable Energy"). 

 

 

Sunkist:  Growing the Future      

ESL 3 and above, including advanced classes

10

 minutes

Call No. 

V35

 

Sunkist is a cooperative organization formed more than 100 years ago by thousands of small citrus ranchers in California and Arizona who banded together in a cooperative to compete more successfully in the worldwide market.  The video shows how Sunkist citrus gets from groves to grocery stores and restaurants around the world. 

 

The narrators speak very clearly with excellent enunciation.  Much of the dialog consists of questions and answers that can be used in pre-viewing and post-viewing activities to guide comprehension and  discussion.   Therefore, you must preview the tape to use it effectively. 

 

Suitability and Implementation:  With appropriate preparation, the video is suitable for classes from ESL 3 through TOEFL.  The following suggests how the video might be used with different ESL levels. 

 

            Sample Lower-level ESL Previewing, Viewing, and Postviewing—Focus pre-viewing activities on citrus fruit and fruit growing vocabulary.   Include simple discussion based on questions and answers like those asked in the video.

 

  1. View once, then ask some literal questions to check students' understanding. 
  2. View again, then ask the specific questions used in the film (when, where, how, etc.)
  3. Discuss how fruit gets to the market in their home countries and in the US. The discussion should lead up to a paragraph or more writing assignment comparing the marketing of fruit in the United States and/or in student's home countries. 

 

Sample Upper-level ESL Previewing, Viewing, and Postviewing—Focus pre-viewing

activity on agri-business, agricultural cooperatives, and global marketing vocabulary and discussion with an emphasis on fruit products like citrus.  Ask students to take notes.  Include post-viewing discussion with the same questions used in pre-viewing activities.  Students should now be asked to answer more specifically, based on information from the video.  Use parts of the video as dictation.  Include several post-viewing writing activities such as a video summary, a comparison of fruit-growing and distribution in their home countries and in the USA, the nature of agricultural cooperatives and agricultural cooperatives in their home countries, etc. 

 

 

Vocabulary:  citrus and different citrus fruits, color of fruits (review for lower-level students), different fruit products and dishes (e.g., juice, salad, desserts), cooperatives, orchards, groves, to ripen, to sort, to promote.

 

 

2.  Saving A Species:  The Sea Turtles Story, The Rhino Story, The Manatee Story

 

ESL 5 and above

30+34+30

 minutes

Call No.: 

V34

 

Endangered Species:  Teacher's Guide

Supplementary teaching material

 

 

VB34

 

Saving A Species is divided into three stand-alone sections on environmental issues.  Each section lasts about 30 minutes.  The videotape has a companion teachers' guide with excellent material that: 

 

§         introduces environmental themes and vocabulary,

§         provides pre-viewing and post-viewing reading and vocabulary activities, and

§         provides pre- and post-assessment questions. 

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

Implementation:  Please do not use any part of the film until you have previewed for vocabulary and difficulty levels and you have decided on appropriate overviewing, previewing, viewing, and post-viewing activities. 

 

  1. Sample Overview Preparation:  

 

§         Use the assessment on the inside front cover to introduce the topic of endangered species and species conservation. 

§         Divide the students into small groups.  Each does a different "math prediction" exercise (p. 7, Teacher's Guide). 

§         Use students' description of their "math" problems and their answers to begin discussion of endangered species issues.   

§         Add other reading, vocabulary, and exercises from the excellent Endangered Species:  Teacher's Guide (e.g., reading passages from pp. 3-6, 20, 23). 

 

  1.  Sample Previewing Activities: 

 

§         Ask students what they know about the species discussed in the film section you will be using. 

§         Use related activities from the Teacher's Guide help introduce the vocabulary and concepts of different film segments (e.g., "Rhino-It-All" on pp. 8-11 for the film segment "The Rhino Story" and "A Calculating Turtle Tale" on pp. 18-19 for the segment "The Sea Turtles Story." 

 

  1. Sample Viewing Activities:  View a video segment once, ask students some literal questions about it to check for comprehension, lead a summary discussion, then view at least one more time. 

 

  1. Sample Post-Viewing Activities: 

 

    1. Ask students to write as much as they remember about the endangered species discussed in each film segment.  Have them read their written statements to the rest of the class. Discuss students' observations.  Ask students to take notes from what other students say
    2. Ask students to rewrite their passages with additional information from the discussion.
    3. Use part of the video as a dictation.  
    4. Dictate an introductory paragraph to an essay about species extinction and conservation.  (Advanced classes might help create the introductory paragraph.)  Discuss with them how they might develop an essay around the introduction.  Then ask them to write at least two paragraphs that illustrate the introduction and to write a concluding paragraph. 

 

 

Science in Action for Conservation:  Understanding and Protecting Biodiversity      

 

ESL 6 and above

 

28 min.

Call No.: 

V36

 

Science in Action for Conservation looks at how scientists and communities work together to conserve biodiversity. The video visits two conservation sites, one in Peru and the other in the United States. The first site shows how scientists work with local communities to preserve untouched biological treasures in the rainforests of  the remote mountains of Cordillera Azul, Peru.  The second site shows how scientists and communities have teamed up to preserve the amazing biodiversity that still exists within the industrial corridor on the shores of Lake Michigan. 

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

Useful previewing and post-viewing teaching support material is available at The Field Museum website:  www.fieldmuseum.org/scienceinaction.    The support material includes background reading, charts, tables, and maps that could be used with ESL classes. 

 

The excerpts below are from the background material found on The Field Museum website.  The excerpts provide some idea of the preparation needed to use the video with advanced ESL students. 

 

Itinerary:  "Science in Action for Conservation" looks at two Field Museum sites that demonstrate how scientists and communities work together to conserve biodiversity. After flying over the remote mountains of Cordillera Azul in Peru where scientists are working to preserve an untouched biological treasure, students visit the Calumet region on the shores of Lake Michigan where scientists collaborate with the local community to preserve the astonishing biodiversity living in the shadows of smokestacks. With this introduction, students are shown how they can get involved and take conservation action in their own neighborhoods with UrbanWatch.

 

The Peruvian National Park:  On May 22, 2001, the President of Peru signed a decree establishing Parque Nacional Cordillera Azul. The Park protects a pristine area of Andean forests bigger than the state of Connecticut and extraordinarily rich in biological diversity. Creation of the Park marks a major victory for conservation but the work is just beginning to ensure effective protection of Cordillera Azul's animal and plant communities.

 

Biodiversity Blitz and Urban Watch:  A Biodiversity Blitz or BioBlitz is a rapid assessment of what lives in a particular area at a given point in time. Biodiversity, the variety of living things, is often discussed in terms of the rain forest or the ocean, not somewhere familiar or local. However, Illinois’ second BioBlitz was held in the city of Chicago when scientists and the public came together for a 24-hour blitz on August 23 and 24, 2002. Participants found an extensive inventory of surprising biodiversity living within the industrial landscape of landfills, refineries, and abandoned steel mills.


A BioBlitz gets people involved in their own communities and promotes a positive awareness of resources and local conservation. Scientists and volunteers are challenged with identifying hundreds of species of plants and animals before the clock stops.  The public also experiences first-hand how real science is put to work. This video shows the bustle in the science tent as insects were pinned, fungi sorted, and pond water examined. Interactive programs, displays, and field trips educated the public on the diversity of the human and ecological communities of the Calumet region.

Other Short Thematic Audio and Video Material

Various Topics and ESL Levels

 

  1. Pears:  A Taste for All Seasons:  ESL 3 and above
  2. A Laundry Epic:  Gone With the Wash:  ESL 4 and above
  3. Breaking the Code:  Sequencing the Arabidopsis Genome:  ARW &  TOEFL
  4. Crossroads Cafe:  Opening Day—ESL 1-4
  5. The European Union—ARW and TOEFL
  6. Master Your Future:  A Program on Financial Responsibility—ESL 6 and above
  7. Mr. Jelly Belly's Factory Tour—ESL 5 and above
  8. Veterinary Medicine
  9. The Fed Today
  10. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

1.  Pears:  A Taste for All Seasons

ESL 3 and above

10 min.

V39

 

Pears:  A Taste for All Season contains gorgeous footage of Pacific Northwest forests, wildlife, mountains, and farms while it explains the ideal growing conditions for Pacific Northwest pears and their preparation for the market.  pears Stock photo

 

Lower and Higher Order Critical Thinking and Language Skills:  Pears can be adapted to different ESL levels.  Lower levels can discuss different fruits in their home countries and the USA, the colors of fruits, their shapes, their flavors, etc.  They can also reference location (East, West, Western, etc.), seasons, and climate. 

 

More advanced students should be working at a higher level of critical thinking and language use.  In keeping with their higher order language-learning objectives, ARW and TOEFL classes should be asked more "how" and "why" questions than "what" questions.

 

Compare the language and critical thinking skills needed to answer the following "what" and "why" questions about the Pears video: 

 

1.  What three conditions produce the best pears?  The answer requires "knowing" three simple facts:  water, soil, and climate.  "Knowing" is considered the lowest level of critical thinking.  These simple facts can be stated in a simple sentence. 

 

2.  Why does the Pacific Northwest produce such good pears?  The answer requires a higher level of abstraction.  Students must establish a cause and effect relationship between the Pacific Northwest's water, soil, and climate and the pears' quality.  Not surprisingly, the "why" question requires them to use complex sentences.  "Explaining" is considered a higher level of critical thinking than merely "knowing." Consequently, "explaining" also usually requires more complex sentence structure.  

 

Sample Lower and Higher Order Description Skills Development:  All students should be required to do some descriptive writing based on the video.  Lower level students might be asked to describe simple colors, shapes, and flavors.  Upper level students, however, might be asked to use simile and metaphor that implies the comparison between two different qualities:  e.g., buttery, creamy, it tastes like _________etc. 

 

Sample Lower and Higher Order Comparing and Contrasting Skills Development:  All students should be required to compare and contrast at an appropriate level.    Lower level students might be asked to compare and contrast any two different pears or fruits for color and shape.  Higher-level students might be asked to compare two ways that fruit is brought to the marketplace in their home countries and in the USA.

 

 

2.  A Laundry Epic:  Gone With the Wash

      Teacher's resource guide

ESL 4 and above with adequate preparation only

23 min.

V40

VB40

 

A Laundry Epic:  Gone With the Wash  uses a humorous mystery story to illustrate proper laundry techniques.  The film might be called "The Case of the Stolen Necklace."  It has all the stereotypical components of an old-fashioned detective story--a detective in a trench coat, an assistant with a magnifying glass, a spoiled rich girl with stuffy servants, relatives with bad motives, etc. 

 

Select a small portion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

Select only one of the four lesson plans in the teacher's resource guide for any single viewing session.   Each of the four lesson plans can be adjusted to different learning outcomes for different ESL levels. 

 

Lesson 3, for example, "This is the Way We Wash Our Clothes," provides an opportunity for lower level students to list the clothes they wear in a week and place them into different categories.  It also provides an opportunity for fieldwork such as finding directions on a laundry product and reporting on it in class. (This might make a nice homework warm-up assignment for the night before the video is shown.) 

 

Lesson 4, "Don't Let Energy Savings Go Down the Drain," consists of 5 different paragraphs, each of which ends with a question.  At the end of the video lesson using Lesson 4, teachers may want to dictate one or more of these paragraphs and then ask students to answer the question in a paragraph or more.   

 

Upper level students might be asked to talk about how different genre communicate meaning.  They might be asked to explain why the detective story genre is effective here.   They might be asked to describe other genres (such as an "epic," used humorously in the title).  An advanced class might also be broken into small groups, each retelling the story in a different genre:  e.g., as a memo, as a news report, as a poem, as a love story, as an historical account, etc. 

 

 

3.  Breaking the Code:  Sequencing the Arabidopsis Genome (National Science Foundation, 2002)

ARW and TOEFL only with very extensive preparation

20 min

Call Number: V24

 

Breaking the Code is a documentary about mapping the plant genome.  The narrator explains that most plants evolved in the last 250,000 years.  Therefore, all plants share a similar genetic make-up.  By mapping the genome of one plant, plant geneticists hope to be able to understand the genetic make-up of all plants as a basis for genetically engineering them to improve human crops and food supplies.  . 

 

Use with TOEFL students as a long, academic lecture type listening exercise.

 

Useful Vocabulary:  genetic, genome, mapping, deciphering, species, (gene) sequence, drought, pest resistant, cellular level, organism, genetic engineering, hereditary, biotechnology

 

 

4.  Crossroads Cafe:  Opening Day (1996), 13 minutes

ESL 1-4

Call Number: V22

 

Opening Day explores the lives of 6 characters involved in the opening of a new cafe in an ethnically diverse neighborhood.  As the video open, Victor Brashov's still does not have a waitress, a cook, a delivery person, a customer, or a name for his cafe.  The video uses everyday language to teach language skills such as giving information about oneself and giving and understanding directions.  The video is divided into 5 parts:

 

  • the first scene in the cafe introducing the story and the cast of characters
  • Culture Clip—a short documentary style section about job hunting and interviewing
  • the second scene in the cafe
  • Word Play—a short animated section that teaches about how to give information about yourself
  • the third scene in the cafe

 

Select one or two of the above sections ion (5 minutes or so) for each video lesson.  The video is not the lesson.  The video is the platform for the language development activities--previewing activities, comprehension exercises, discussion, and the final independent writing activity

 

5.  The European Union (2002)

ARW and TOEFL

with extensive preparation

Call Number: V26

 

The European Union is appropriate only for advanced students in ARW and TOEFL.  Narrators use BBC English (British but not heavily accented) or speak in their own languages with English subtitles. 

 

The segments appropriate for Spanish-American Institute classes can be grouped into three categories:

 

  1. the development of the European Union (segments 2, 3, & 5);
  2. the development of a common currency, the Euro (segments 6-7); and
  3. the development of environmental policies (segments 8-9)

 

It is possible to use the segments on a common currency (6-7) or on environmental concerns (8-9) independently without using any of the others. 

 

I.  Goals and Purpose of the European Union (segments 5, 3, & 2)

Familiarize yourself with each segment before using it in class.  Use only one video segment per class session.  Follow the order recommended below:

 

Vocabulary: Students must know certain general vocabulary to understand the concepts.  Please make sure students are comfortable with this vocabulary and the concepts expressed before using any segment: 

 

  • convention, forum, parliament, constitution, council
  • minister (ministerial), heads of state, ombudsman
  • union (as in a group of states), inter-governmental, united front, member states, political entity
  • institutions (as in customs, practices, systems, etc.)
  • monetary systems, common currency

 

Vocabulary more specific to each segment is included in the description of video segments below. 

 

5.  The Council of the European Union (2000) –  8 minutes 

Introduces the role and tasks of the Council of the European Union. 

 

3.  The Convention on the Future of Europe (2002) – 4:35 minutes

Describes the European Union as it prepares to expand from 10 to 20 Member States through the addition primarily of Central and Eastern European countries.  

 

Vocabulary:  crossroads, member states, enlargement, institutions, legitimacy, pros & cons, presidium, innovations, deliberations, political entity  

 

2.  The Future of the European Union (2002) – 11 minutes

Describes the creation of the Convention on the Future of Europe in 2001 (see segment 3, above).  Discusses six priority areas for the European Union and creation of a new European identity.  Very attractive visuals. 

 

            Vocabulary:  free trade, political community/entity, consolidating institutions, universal suffrage, goods and capital, solidarity, dynamic, knowledge-based economy, to subscribe to values, ombudsman

 

II.  A Common European Currency:  The Euro

Familiarize yourself with each segment before using it in class.  Use only one video segment per class session.  Follow the order recommended below:

 

6.  EuroPass:  Questions About the Euro (2002) – 2:16 minutes

Describes euro cash and transition schedules for phasing out the use of national currencies. 

 

            Vocabulary:  legal tender, parity rates, notes (monetary), and national cash/currency

 

7.  Euro 1999 (1999) – 7 minutes

Describes the 50-year history to form the common European currency that is now an essential part of the Single Market.  Describes the change from national currencies to the Euro.  Attractive visuals. 

 

            Vocabulary:  European construction (as in construction of the idea of Europe), Single Market currency, criteria, Eurozone, monetary union, price stability, bank notes, transition period, transactions, monetary system, common face/national face (the two sides of each Euro coin and paper currency)

 

III.  Environmental Concerns and Policies

Familiarize yourself with each segment before using it in class.  Use only one video segment per class session. 

 

8.  Our Future, Our Choice (2002) – 13 minutes

Describes how human consumption patterns are changing the planet, placing a burden on soil, sea, and forests.  Organized around the main themes of Health, Climate Change, and Biodiversity.  Describes European development of renewable energy sources and creation of the "Natura 2000" program to preserve  nature protection zones.  Very attractive visuals. 

 

            Vocabulary:  environmental, to squander/deplete resources, waste (sewerage and garbage), consumption patterns, recycle, pollution, cradle to grave, sustainable development, pesticides, contaminate, treat waste water, initiatives, global warming, greenhouse effect, renewable energy source, biodiversity, species, natural habitats, nature protection zones, replenish, flourish

 

9.  Renewable Energies:  The Malmo Case (2001) – 9 minutes

Describes European efforts to control the greenhouse effect by reducing greenhouse gas emissions.  These gas emissions are produced in the consumption of fossil fuels, which produce Carbon Dioxide (CO2).  Depicts Malmo, Sweden's creation of a special renewable energy district.  

 

            Vocabulary:  greenhouse gases, gas emissions, solar cells, solar collectors, carpools, hybrid vehicles, alternative fuels, insulating materials, sustainable development, renewable energy

  

 

6.  Master Your Future:  A Program on Financial Responsibility (2002), 23 minutes

ESL 6 and above

Call Number: V23

 

Master Your Future comes with a Teacher's Guide, Student Worksheets, and Poster.  The Worksheets contain several different in-class exercises that can be used for vocabulary development, reading, writing, and critical thinking in English.   The video can be used to:

  • teach everyday financial vocabulary in context
  • teach students about basic financial services and personal financial planning
  • provide students with insights into American high school teenage life
  • provide opportunities for student speaking and writing about personal financial management. 

 

The film involves interviews with typical American high school students faced with paying for their senior prom night.  Characters speak very fast with regional accents.  The 23-minute video is divided into three segments:  budgeting, banking, and credit/credit history.  Use only one section or part of one section for each video lesson.  The film helps students learn about basic financial services and personal financial management.  The use of American high school student characters and scenes provide international students some insights into the lives of typical American teenagers.

 

 

7.  Mr. Jelly Belly's Factory Tour

ESL 5 and above

Call Number: V31

8 min

 

Do not use without at least one day of previewing activity!

 

Mr. Jelly Belly leads a field trip through the Jelly Belly manufacturing plant.  (Jelly Belly jellybeans are a well-known gourmet brand that comes in 50 or more flavors.)  The video shows the various steps in the manufacture of a familiar product.  They will also see the strict quality control mechanisms used at the factory. 

 

Vocabulary:  The video provides a good platform for teaching students about the language of manufacturing and quality control.  Important words and terms include--factory, plant, manufacturing, production, steps in the process, ingredients, gourmet, flavors, quality control (consistency, consistent quality, quality assurance, precision control, guarantee, inspected, imperfections, precision control)