SPANISH-
AMERICAN

INSTITUTE

established  1955

Accredited by the Accreditation Council for Independent Colleges and Schools to award certificates and diplomas

·       authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students

·       registered by the new York state education department

·       financial aid available to those who qualify

 

(The Institute Foundation, Inc.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A not-for-profit, equal educational opportunity institution

215 West 43 Street l Times Square l Manhattan l New York 10036-3913

Voice: 212.840.7111 l fax: 212.719.5922 l info@sai2000.org l www.sai2000.org

VoIP internet phone: 166.84.191.135 l news://166.84.191.133

Library catalog:  library.sai2000.org/m3

wireless internet "Wife Hotspot" throughout!

 

 

Dante V. Ferraro, President

Paul Schiffman, Dean of Students

Dr. Carolyn Prager, Dean of Academic Affairs

 

 

Frank J. Ferraro, Director Emeritus (d. 2005)

David Schiffman, Director Emeritus

Robert Connelly, Dean of Students Emeritus

volume 22/ Winter 2007

01/04/2008 7:14:13 PM printing

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.     ABOUT THE INSTITUTE                      6

1. President's Welcome................................................................................ 6

2. Mission Statement................................................................................... 6

3. History of the Institute............................................................................. 6

4. Location and Directions............................................................................ 6

5. Description of Facilities............................................................................ 7

6. Instructional Equipment............................................................................ 7

7. Method of Instruction.............................................................................. 7

8. School Approvals..................................................................................... 7

9. Accreditation........................................................................................... 7

10.    School and Faculty Affiliations............................................................. 8

11.    Legal Control...................................................................................... 8

12.    Administration.................................................................................... 8

13.    Student Services Associates................................................................. 9

14.    Faculty Student-Services Associates..................................................... 9

15.    Faculty Chairpersons........................................................................... 9

16.    Faculty............................................................................................. 10

17.    Advisory Board................................................................................. 12

18.    Catalog Disclaimer............................................................................ 12

19.    Statement of Policy on Discrimination................................................. 12

II.   STUDENT SERVICES                          13

1. Placement Assistance............................................................................. 13

2. Guidance............................................................................................... 13

3. Substance Abuse.................................................................................... 13

4. College Transfer Counseling................................................................... 13

5. Library/Learning Resources.................................................................... 13

6. Student Lounge..................................................................................... 14

7. Student ID Card.................................................................................... 14

8. Bookstore Commissary.......................................................................... 14

9. Complaint Procedures............................................................................ 14

10.    Internet Access................................................................................. 15

11.    Smoking Policy................................................................................. 15

12.    Food Consumption Policy.................................................................. 15

13.    Student Code Of Conduct.................................................................. 15

14.    Suspension/Termination For School-Rule Violations............................. 15

15.    Student/Faculty Campus Security Report............................................ 15

III.  PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION        17

9480 English As A Second Language/480 (480 hours)................................... 17

5960 English As A Second Language/960 (960 hours)................................... 18

7020 Computerized Office Management (1600 hours).................................. 19

8002 Accounting (1600 hours).................................................................... 20

8010 Computer-Assisted Accounting (1600 hours)........................................ 21

IV.  Course of Study Requirements for F-1 Student Visa Applicants                                                                                                22

Course of Study Requirements for F-1 Student Visa Applicants with ESL-Plus (1920 hours)        22

V.    COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                   23

200 Keyboarding For Information Processing (48 hours)............................... 23

201 Keyboarding (Basic Course) (120 hours)............................................... 23

202 Keyboarding (Advanced Course) (120 hours)........................................ 24

203 Keyboarding (Expert Course) (80 hours)............................................... 24

205 Machine Transcription (30 hours)......................................................... 25

230 Computer Word Processing  (80 hours)................................................. 25

235 Introduction to MS Word for Windows (80 hours)................................. 26

240 Introduction to Word Perfect (80 hours)................................................ 26

300 Business Management (120 hours)........................................................ 27

301 Business Mathematics (24 hours).......................................................... 27

302 Accounting (First Course) (120 hours)................................................... 27

303 Accounting (Intermediate Course) (120 hours)....................................... 28

304 Accounting (Advanced I) (60 hours)..................................................... 28

305 Accounting (Advanced II) (60 hours).................................................... 29

310 Import-Export Management (80 hours)................................................. 29

401 Office Practice (160 hours).................................................................. 29

402 Electronic Calculators (48 hours).......................................................... 30

404 Business Communications (72 hours).................................................... 30

501 English As A Second Language I-VI (120 hours [each level]).................. 31

502 Business English Communications (120 hours)....................................... 32

503 Advanced Reading & Writing (120 hours)............................................. 32

604 High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation (120  hours).................... 32

610 TOEFL Exam Preparation (80 hours)................................................... 33

620 College Success (160 hours)................................................................. 33

900 IBM Computer Graphics (80 hours)...................................................... 34

925 Database Management (80 hours)......................................................... 34

930 Introduction to DOS (80 hours)............................................................ 34

935 Using Lotus 1-2-3 (80 hours)............................................................... 35

940 Introduction to Microsoft Windows (80 hours)....................................... 35

945 Introduction to MS Works (80 hours)................................................... 35

950 Using Excel for Windows (80 hours)..................................................... 36

955 Using the Internet (80 hours)................................................................ 36

960 Using Microsoft Access (80 hours)....................................................... 37

965 Using Microsoft PowerPoint (80 hours)................................................ 37

970 Computerized Accounting Using Peachtree (80 hours)............................ 37

975 Using Adobe PhotoShop (160 hours).................................................... 38

980 Using Microsoft FrontPage (160 hours)................................................. 38

985 Using Windows Movie Maker (80 hours).............................................. 39

VI.  ADMISSIONS & FINANCIAL AID      40

1. Admissions Requirements....................................................................... 40

2. Admissions Procedures For Programs...................................................... 40

3. Advanced Standing................................................................................ 40

4. Transfer Of Hours................................................................................. 40

5. Student Visa Applications  (Form / I-20).................................................. 41

6. Financial Assistance............................................................................... 41

7. Tap Grant Waiver Criteria...................................................................... 42

8. Refund Policy........................................................................................ 42

9. Enrollment Agreement............................................................................ 43

10.    Tuition............................................................................................. 44

11.    Financial Aid Refund Distribution Policy............................................. 44

12.    Financial Aid Repayment Distribution Policy....................................... 44

13.    Student Loan Pro-Rata Refund Clause................................................ 44

VII. ACADEMIC POLICIES                       45

1. Office Hours......................................................................................... 45

2. Student Program Card............................................................................ 45

3. Program Changes................................................................................... 45

4. Attendance And Tardiness...................................................................... 45

5. Textbooks And Materials........................................................................ 45

6. "Fair Use" Duplication of Copyrighted Classroom Material Guidelines........ 45

7. Homework............................................................................................ 46

8. Make-Up Assignments / Tests................................................................. 46

9. Dress Code........................................................................................... 46

10.    Leave Of Absence............................................................................. 46

11.    Grading Scale................................................................................... 47

12.    Maintaining Satisfactory Progress....................................................... 47

13.    Grade Reporting Procedures.............................................................. 48

14.    Academic Warning and Probation....................................................... 48

15.    Evaluation Points in the Academic Program......................................... 49

16.    Program Graduation Requirements..................................................... 49

17.    Course Certificates of Completion...................................................... 50

18.    Academic Year................................................................................. 50

19.    Academic Calendar........................................................................... 50

20.    Class Hour Schedule......................................................................... 51

21.    Instructional Hour............................................................................. 51

22.    List of Programs............................................................................... 52

23.    ESL-Plus Course of Study Requirements for F-1 Student Visa Applicants 52

24.    List of Courses................................................................................. 53

VIII.    Student Club Notes                                                                55

1. Free and Low Cost Gyms, Health Clubs and Pools................................... 55

2. Manhattan Recreation Centers................................................................ 56

3. Free Flu, Tetanus, Pneumococcal, Hepatitis B Shots................................. 57

4. “English through the Arts” ~ Request for Proposals.................................. 58

 

1.    President's Welcome

Welcome to the Spanish-American Institute!  As we approach our 50th anniversary, we are proud that since 1955 the Institute has educated about 100,000 students from all over the world.  While the requirements of business have changed greatly over the decades, the Institute remains dedicated to the success of New York's foreign-born students. 

The Institute offers students opportunities to prepare for entry-level employment in a variety of fields including Accounting and Computer Applications.  Computer applications courses include Word Processing, Excel, Access, PhotoShop, and FrontPage, among others.  The Institute also offers a wide array of courses in English as a Second Language from beginning language courses through TOEFL preparation.  Graduates are awarded Certificates of Completion for courses and Diplomas or Certificates for programs.  Program graduates may make use of our employment assistance service.

We offer day and evening courses five days a week from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. so that students can take classes that fit their schedules.  As you review this catalog, you will learn even more about the Spanish-American Institute. 

If you would like additional information, I invite you to call or to visit and tour our facilities. The office at 215 West 43 Street, (Times Square), Manhattan, New York 10036-3913, 212-840-7111, is open for information, registration, and guidance from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Friday.

2.    Mission Statement

The Spanish-American Institute's mission is to provide effective skills training to individuals seeking entry-level office employment.

Philosophy - The Institute' serves a largely foreign-born population which faces a double challenge:

·       to acquire entry-level office skills in keyboarding, accounting, computer operation and

·       to improve English language ability.

The Institute believes that students who can anticipate progress on both fronts from the start of classes are more likely to begin and to successfully complete training.  Courses and programs at the Spanish-American Institute permit an individual to pursue these two goals simultaneously.

Objectives -The Institute implements this philosophy through:

·       the establishment and maintenance of an effective faculty

·       the development of business, computer, and language courses and programs

·       the integration of a varied English as a Second Language course sequence

3.    History of the Institute

The Spanish-American Institute was founded in 1955 by Frank J. Ferraro, President, and David Schiffman, Vice President.  In 1996, it was donated by their successors to The Institute Foundation, Inc., a not-for-profit, equal educational opportunity institution. 

4.    Location and Directions

The Spanish-American Institute is located in the heart of New York's theater and entertainment district.  Times Square is quite literally the "crossroads" of the City.  It is the only place in New York City that has an Express Stop on every subway line!

By Subway.  The A, B, CC, D, E, F, SS, N, RR, 1, 2, 3, and 7 subway lines have express stops at Times Square.  The 4, 5, and 6 East Side trains connect to Times Square from Grand Central Terminal by the SS "Shuttle".

Local Bus Service.  Numerous City buses stop at Times Square.
Express Bus.  Many areas outside Manhattan are served by private and City express buses, all of which make stops at or near Times Square.

From New Jersey.  The Institute is less than two blocks from the Port Authority Bus Terminal which serves neighboring New Jersey towns.

By Car.  While parking is available at area garages and some students "car-pool" with family and friends, mass transit offers such abundant, varied and inexpensive transportation that few choose to drive.

5.    Description of Facilities

The Institute moved to its present custom-designed, fully air-conditioned facility on the second floor at 215 West 43 Street, Manhattan in 1968.  The administrative offices, guidance offices, bookstore, student lounge, computer room, and classrooms are easily accessible to each other.  The Institute is wheelchair accessible.  Every effort will be accommodate people with special needs.  For additional information, please contact the Dean of Students at (212) 840-7111.

6.    Instructional Equipment

Computer, keyboarding, accounting, Internet, and TOEFL students have access to modern computer equipment, software, and printers.  English language classes have access to TV/VCRs and tape recorders for audiovisual language learning and reinforcement. 

7.    Method of Instruction

The Institute is a clock-hour, continuous enrollment institution.  All courses and programs are designed so that students can enroll in any class at any time during the year and progress systematically through each class.  Students are tested regularly and must pass required tests to maintain good academic standing.

New students are admitted to classes on the second Monday of each month.  When the second Monday is a school holiday, new students are admitted on Tuesday.  Exceptions may be made upon consultation with the Dean of Admissions.

8.    School Approvals

The Spanish-American Institute is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant, alien students. It has been registered as a Registered Private Business School by the New York State Department of Education since 1973.  Prospective students and their parents may review school approval and accreditation documents by contacting the President for an appointment at 212-840-7111.

9.    Accreditation

The Institute is accredited to award certificates and diplomas by:

The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools

750 First Street, NE, Suite 980, Washington, DC .20002-4241

202-336-6780   www.acics.org

The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) is a national accrediting agency recognized by the United States Department of Education.  The Council for Higher Education Accreditation also recognizes ACICS' accreditation of degree-granting institutions.

10.School and Faculty Affiliations

The Institute, administration, or faculty maintain affiliations with the following community, civic, and educational organizations:

Forum of Italian-American Educators

NYS Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators

Teachers of English as a Second Language Association (TESOL)

The Time Square Business Improvement District

11.Legal Control

The Institute Foundation, Inc., a not‑for‑profit New York corporation established in 1995, owns the Spanish-American Institute.  Its officers are Dante V. Ferraro, President/Treasurer; Paul Schiffman, Vice President; and Robert Connelly, Secretary.

12.Administration

Dante V. Ferraro, President/Financial Aid Director, BA, Fordham

 

dvf@sai2000.org

Paul C. Schiffman, Dean of Students/TAP Certifying Officer, BS Ed., Hofstra University

 

paul@sai2000.org

Dr. Carolyn Prager, Dean of Academic Affairs, PhD, Fordham University

 

drprager@sai200.org

 

 

Frank J. Ferraro, Director Emeritus (d.2005), MA, New York University

David Schiffman, Director Emeritus, MA, New York University

Robert Connelly, Dean of Students Emeritus, BA, Fairleigh Dickenson University

 

13.Student Services Associates

Ildelisa Lopez

 

ildelisa@sai2000.org

Rosalia Santana

 

rosalia@sai2000.org

Yukiko Yasuda

 

yukiko@sai2000org

 

 

14.Faculty Student-Services Associates

Aissatou M. Bah

 

aissatou@sai2000.org

LLB, Universite Gamal Abdel Nasser de Conakry

Mary Helen Gomez

 

maryhelen@sai2000.org

BBA, Pontificia Universidad Catolica Madre Y Maestra

Lyudmila Klavsen

 

lyudmil@sai2000.org

MS, Izhevsk Institute of Mechanical Engineering

Devrim Idil Mumkaya

 

idil@sai2000.org

MA, Brooklyn College

BS, Hacettepe University

Marcela Quintero

 

marcela@sai200.org

BS, Universidad de America

Alicia Santos

 

alicia@sai2000.org

BS, , Pontificia Universidad Catolica Madre Y Maestra

Naomi Yoshida

 

naomi@sai2000.org

BA, Dokkyo University

Bouchra Zouhairi

 

boucra@sai2000.org

BS, Mohammed V Agal University

15.Faculty Chairpersons

 

 

Degree/Institution Awarding Degree

Department

Lilliam Hernandez

MA, City College of New York

BS, Accounting, Universidad Nacional de Nicaragua

CPA, Universidad Nacional de Nicaragua

Business Department

Enrique Nibeyro

BS, Argentine Catholic Pontifical University

Computer Studies

Anatoli Verbine

BS, Tambov State University

MEd, Lehman College

English Department

16.Faculty

 

 

Degree/Institution Awarding Degree

Teaching Specialization

Jenny Arbai

BS, Triskati School of Management

English as a Second Language

Zoya Armyakova Lee

MA Ed, Mari State University

BS, Institute of Trade & Law

English as a Second Language

Dr. Alexandr Burakovskiy

PhD, All-Union Institute

Computer Applications

Freddie Ann Bush

MS, Hunter College

BS, North Carolina A&T

English as a Second Language

Eligio Castillo

BA, La Consolacion College

English as a Second Language

Leni Concepcion

MA, University of the Philippine

BS, Northwestern Educational Institution

English as a Second Language

Ana M.Diaz

BS, Univ. Autonoma Santo Domingo

Computer Applications, Business Education, English as a Second Language

Gladys Diaz

BS, Univ.. Autonoma Santo Domingo

Computer Applications

Lina Eco

BS, University of the East

English as a Second Language, Business Education, Computer Applications

Linda Fallarme

BA, University of the East, Manila

English as a Second Language

Judy Gaylan

BS Education, West Negros College

English as a Second Language

Libertad Grajo

BS, Manuel L. Quezon University

English as a Second Language

Lilliam Hernandez

MA, City College of New York

BS, Accounting, Univ Nacional de Nicaragua

CPA, Univ.Nacional de Nicaragua

Accounting, Spanish GED

Fatman Kikilashvili

BS, Aristotle Greek-Georgian Univ.

English as a Second Language

Jilou Yaovi Kodjo

MS & BS, Universite du Benin

Computer Applications

Maria A. Machado

BA, UNITAU, Taubaté University

General Academic

Marketing and Management

Erlinda Manliclic

BS, Far Eastern University

Computer Applications, ESL

Melvin Marcus

BS, Syracuse University

English as a Second Language

Enrique Nibeyro

BS, Argentine Catholic Pontifical University

Computer Applications

Vicenta Ortiz

BA, University of Santo Tomas

English as a Second Language

Dr. Nori Panganiban

EdD, Centro Escolar University

MA, National Teachers College

BS, Golden Gate College

Business Education, English as a Second Language

Emiliano Ramos

BS, Mapua Institute of Technology

English as a Second Language

Ivelisse Rymer

BS, Univ. Autonoma Santo Domingo

Accounting

Natalya Tomskikh

MA, Glazovski State Pedagogic Institute

General Academic

Alumna Tuldanes

BS Education, San Nicolas College

English as a Second Language

Anatoli Verbine

MEd, Lehman College

BS, Tambov State University

English as a Second Language

Marcia Vieira

MEd, Hunter College

English as a Second Language

17.Advisory Board

Advisory Board members represent education, community, and business.  They advise the Institute on community needs and business trends considered in the design and implementation of our programs.  This input keeps the Institute "in touch" with new developments.  The Advisory Board is part of our continuing effort to improve and maintain the quality of the training for its students.  Advisory Boards members for 2003-2004 are: 

Steven Corwin, Corwin Accounting Services

M. David Distler, Attorney-at-Law

Dr. Barbara Ferraro, Assistant Superintendent, Rye Neck Schools, and Principal, Rye Neck High School

Rob Goldie, President, Starr Printing

Harvey Glick, CPA

Jeffrey Gural, President, Newmark & Company Real Estate

Fred Hirsch, President, Fred Hirsch Educational Consultants

Dr. Robert Montgomery, Educational Consulting

Octavio Rocha, Account Executive, Hispanicmark Advertising

Donald Ross, Esquire, Malkin and Ross

Kenneth Zimmerman, Chateaux Software

18.Catalog Disclaimer

Please be advised that some information in this catalog may have changed after printing.  If you have any questions, please check with a school Dean to determine if there are any changes in the courses/curricula, the teaching personnel, or other information listed in the catalog.

19.Statement of Policy on Discrimination

The Spanish-American Institute does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin, race, gender, or sexual orientation in its employment practices or in the educational programs and activities it operates.  Inquiries concerning this policy of equal opportunity and affirmative action should be referred to the Institute’s Affirmative Action Officer, Dante V. Ferraro, 215 West 43 Street, Manhattan, NY 10036-3913, 212-840-7111 (ext. 2800), fax: 212‑719‑5922, e‑mail: dvf@sai2000.org, www.sai2000.org.

 

1.    Placement Assistance

Students enrolled in programs who wish placement assistance should register with the Dean of Students at least two weeks prior to the completion of their program.  While placement assistance is available, the Institute does not promise or guarantee employment to any student or graduate.

2.    Guidance

The Institute maintains an "open door" policy regarding the personal and academic guidance of its students.  Students seeking advice on personal or academic matters have access to both administration and faculty.  The Administration will formally meet with students when deemed necessary to discuss academic, attendance, or school rules and policies issues.

3.    Substance Abuse

Institute policies prohibit substance abuse among all members of the school community.  Faculty and administration encourage students to recognize the dangers of substance abuse and to stay free of abuse. Professional information and counseling sources are available in the Institute's office and resource centers. 

4.    College Transfer Counseling

The Institute supports the principle of transfer and the award of credit for previous academic work.  School personnel are ready to assist graduates seeking admission to other institutions in requesting credit for courses or programs completed at the Institute.

Students seeking transfer credit to other institutions and programs should keep in mind that each institution is responsible for determining its own policies and practices with regard to transfer and award of credit.  There are at least three considerations that may affect transfer:

·       Educational quality of the institution from which the student transfers.  Accreditation by the Association of Independent Schools and Colleges or a similar accrediting body indicates that an institution meets certain minimum standards.

·       Comparability of the nature, content, and level of previous academic work to that offered by the receiving institution.

·       Appropriateness and applicability of previous academic work to the programs offered by the receiving institution in light of the student's educational goals.

5.    Library/Learning Resources

Students and faculty have access to academic resource materials in several ways: 

·       The Spanish-American Institute Library houses over 450 print volumes, including encyclopedias and other reference materials.

·       Automated catalogs and databases provide electronic access to the Spanish-American Institute Library catalog and those of other libraries and access to periodical databases, many with full-text articles.

·       The Bookstore provides faculty with audio-visual equipment and language laboratory tapes for classroom use. 

·       The Student Lounge contains current publications as The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Time Magazine, and other magazines and periodicals.    

·       Computer workstations provide Internet access. 

6.    Student Lounge

The Student Lounge is available during school hours to students and faculty who wish to study or "snack" before or after class.  Students are not permitted in the Student Lounge during those hours when they are scheduled for classes.  The Lounge contains current issues of newspapers and magazines, discount ticket vouchers to current Broadway shows and amusement parks, and "readcycle" books which students may take with them.

7.    Student ID Card 

Each student is issued a Student ID Card the first day of class.  Students should carry this card with them at all times.  Persons unable to identify themselves as students of the Institute may be asked to leave the school.  Many social and cultural institutions that offer special student discounts accept the Institute's student ID card. 

8.    Bookstore Commissary

The Institute's Bookstore maintains a supply of textbooks, workbooks, materials and supplies required for course and program assignments.  Students may also purchase light snacks in the Bookstore.  The Bookstore is maintained for the convenience of the student body.  While students are required to have the necessary texts, materials, etc., before starting classes, they may obtain them from outside sources, if they so desire.

9.    Complaint Procedures

Students and all employees (including administrative staff) who have concerns, dissatisfactions, or complaints are encouraged to bring them to the Institute's attention as promptly as possible.  Problems involving classroom matters should first be discussed directly with the faculty member involved.  Questions about administrative policies or non-academic matters should be discussed with a Faculty Student-Services Associate.

Concerns unresolved with a Faculty Student-Services Associate may be discussed with the Dean of Students.  Dissatisfactions unresolved with the Dean of Students should be presented to the President.

Remaining issues may be submitted in writing to the Board of Directors.  The submission should describe the problem in detail, include any available documentation, and be signed by the student or employee.  The Board will make appropriate inquiries and recommend a resolution within thirty (30) days of receiving the written concern and will notify the student or employee of those findings.

At no time shall a final determination be made by a person or persons directly involved in the complaint itself.  Students and employees are assured that no adverse action will be taken against anyone expressing a concern through this mechanism.

A student or employee who is not satisfied with the Institute's complaint resolution and who has reason to believe that the institution has acted contrary to its published standards or that conditions at the institution appear to jeopardize the quality of the instructional programs or the general welfare of its students may file a written complaint with the New York State Education Department.  Any person who believes he or she has been aggrieved by the institution on or after May 4, 1994, may file a written complaint with the Department within two years of the alleged incident, as follows:

The person should first try to resolve the complaint directly with the institution by following the internal complaint procedures described above.  Copies of all documents and correspondence should be kept.

If a person is unable to resolve the complaint with the institution or believes that the institution has not properly addressed the concerns, he or she may request a complaint form by telephoning the Postsecondary Complaint Registry or writing to the New York Education Department, Postsecondary Complaint Registry, 116 West 32 Street, 14th Floor, New York, NY  10001, 212-643-4760 / Fax: 212-643-4765.

The Postsecondary Complaint Registry Form should be completed, signed and sent to the above address. The completed form should indicate the resolution being sought and any efforts that have been made to resolve the complaint through the institution's internal complaint processes.  Copies of all relevant documents should be included.

After receiving the completed form, the Department will notify the complainant of its receipt and make any necessary request for further information. When appropriate, the Department will also advise the institution that a complaint has been made and, when appropriate, the nature of the complaint.  The complainant will also be notified of the name of the evaluator assigned to address the specific complaint.  The evaluator may contact the complainant for additional information.

The Department will make every effort to address and resolve complaints within ninety days from receipt of the complaint form.

Some complaints may fall within the jurisdiction of an agency or organization other than the State Education Department. These complaints will be referred to the entity with appropriate jurisdiction. When a complaint concerns a matter that falls solely within the jurisdiction of the institution, the complainant will be notified and the Department will refer the complaint to the institution in question and request that the matter receive a review and response.

Upon conclusion of the Department's complaint review or upon the disposition of the complaint by referral to another agency or organization, or to the institution, the Department will issue a written notice to the complainant describing the resolution of the complaint. The complainant may contact the Department evaluator directly for follow-up information or for additional assistance.

In addition, students and employees may contact the Institute’s accrediting body, the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, 750 First Street, NE, Suite 980, Washington, DC 20002-4242, Telephone:  202-336-6780, Fax: 202-842-2593.

10.Internet Access

Classroom and office facilities are wired for T-1 Internet access.  The entire school facility provides wireless access to the Internet. 

11.Smoking Policy

In accordance with New York City Law, smoking is not permitted in the Institute or in any indoor public building areas.

12.Food Consumption Policy

Food and beverage consumption is discouraged in classrooms.  The Student Lounge is available for those who wish to bring lunch or to snack between classes.

13.Student Code Of Conduct

Students are expected to conduct themselves properly in classes and about the school area.  Movement between classes should be orderly.  Students must report promptly to classes when the bell rings.  There should be mutual respect among students and teachers at all times.

14.Suspension/Termination For School-Rule Violations

A student's failure to behave properly may result in expulsion after a hearing before appropriate administrative personnel.  Students dismissed due to improper conduct, poor attendance, failing progress, or tuition arrears are not relieved of financial obligations as specified in the Enrollment Agreement.  Such dismissal does not affect the computation of the applicable refund calculation.

15.Student/Faculty Campus Security Report

As required for participation in Title IV Federal Financial Aid Programs, the Spanish-American Institute provides the following Campus Security Report to students, prospective students, and faculty and staff.

Campus Security Policies.  All areas of the school are under the constant supervision of the school President and Deans, administrative personnel, and faculty members at all times.  Each is familiar with the procedures to follow in responding to emergencies and crime situations.  Every effort is made to minimize the risk of crime.

Procedure for Reporting Emergencies and Crimes.  In the event of an emergency or crime, students should contact the nearest faculty member or administrative support person and/or the Institute President's office.

Procedure for Responding to Reports of Emergencies & Crimes.  All faculty and staff members will notify the office immediately when appraised of such situations.  The President or his designee will notify the police, medical personnel, or other appropriate agencies.  In the event of an emergency or crime requires immediate action, all faculty and administrative personnel will respond by calling one or more of the following numbers:

 

Police, Fire, and Medical Emergencies

911

 

Building Security

212-302-5764

212-354-2206

212-354-3181

Saint Vincent/Saint Clair's Hospital

212-586-1500

 

In the event of fire, follow the exit procedures listed for fires on posted signs.  Fire extinguishers are located throughout the school.  All school personnel are familiar with fire and exit procedures.

Policy Regarding Alcohol and Drug-Related Violations.  In accordance with Federal regulations stipulated by the Drug Free Act of 1988, the drug and alcohol policy of the Spanish-American Institute is as follows:

·       The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of alcohol, narcotics, or illicit drugs, or the consumption of alcohol by persons under the State legal age is prohibited on Institute premises. 

·       Any student or employee discovered to be violating these rules is subject to suspension and/or dismissal.  Such action will be taken independently of any criminal action that may arise from a violation of civil law governing these areas.

·       Reinstatement of suspended students or employees will not occur until the Institute can ascertain by professional documentation that the student has undergone counseling and treatment and is free from any drug or alcohol addiction. 

Information Programs Available.

If you or someone you know needs help with drug and/or alcohol or if you would like information, please refer to the Institute's Drug and Alcohol Handbook or contact the school office or one of the following agencies:

·       Narcotics Anonymous Regional Helpline ~ 212-929-6262

·       Alcoholics Anonymous Intergroup Hotline ~ 212-647-1680

Campus Crime Statistics.

As required for participation in Title IV Federal Financial Aid Programs, the Spanish American Institute is providing the following report of campus crime statistics for the last three years:  August 1,2004-July 31,2005; August 1, 2005-July 31, 2006; and August 1, 2006-July 31, 2007. 

 

Criminal Offenses

 

a.  Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

b.  Forcible sex offenses (including forcible rape)

0

c.  Non-forcible sex offenses

0

d.  Robbery

0

e.  Aggravated assault

0

f.  Burglary

0

g.  Motor vehicle theft

0

h.  Arson

0

i.  Negligent manslaughter

0

9480 English As A Second Language/480 (480 hours)

DURATION OPTIONS:  Each course is from Monday to Friday inclusive.

24 months / 1 hours daily

 8 months / 3 hours daily

4.8 months / 5 hours daily

12  months / 2 hours daily

 6 months / 4 hours daily

4 months / 6 hours daily

OBJECTIVES: 1.) perform more effectively on present job using improved English language skills;  2.) obtain employment using skills learned previously which could not be utilized due to a lack of English language skills; or 3.) obtain admission to academic or vocational training requiring improved English language skills.

STANDARD:  Demonstrate mastery of the terminal objectives of each of the component courses through teacher-graded class participation, periodic quizzes, and bi-monthly examinations.  Passing grade:  65%.

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVE: Graduates of this program will be able to use improved English language skills to perform present jobs more effectively, to obtain employment with previously learned skills that could not be utilized due to inadequate English language skills, or to obtain admission to academic or vocational education requiring improved English language skills.

REQUIRED COURSES:  total hours                                                                                 480*

501 English as a Second Language Level I

120

501 English as a Second Language Level II

120

501 English as a Second Language Level III

120

501 English as a Second Language Level IV

120

501 English as a Second Language Level V

120

501 English as a Second Language Level VI

120

502 Business English Communications

120

503 Advanced Reading and Writing

120

610 TOEFL Exam Preparation

80

ELECTIVE HOURS: * Students begin studies at the levels corresponding to their current language abilities as determined by an oral placement test and remain in the assigned level for the number of hours indicated unless the instructor recommends a higher level sooner or later.  Teacher recommendations are based on student attainment of the course terminal objectives in less than (or more than) the normal number of hours.  Students may complete less than (or more  than) 480-hours of course work in 480 hours if teachers recommend advancement upon completion of terminal objectives prior to (or after) completion of the course hours.  Slower students must complete 65% of the course hour terminal objectives to maintain satisfactory academic progress.  Therefore, the number of hours spent in each course will vary according to course placement at registration and individual achievement of terminal course objectives.

TUITION:  $1440.      Diploma:  English as a Second Language/480

5960 English As A Second Language/960 (960 hours)

DURATION OPTIONS:  Each course is from Monday to Friday inclusive.

48 months / 1 hours daily

16 months / 3 hours daily

9.6 months / 5 hours daily

24  months / 2 hours daily

12 months / 4 hours daily

8 months/ 6 hours daily

OBJECTIVES: 1.) perform more effectively on present job using improved English language skills;  2.) obtain employment using skills learned previously which could not be utilized due to a lack of English language skills; or 3.) obtain admission to academic or vocational training requiring improved English language skills.

STANDARD:  Demonstrate mastery of the terminal objectives of each of the component courses through teacher-graded class participation, periodic quizzes, and bi-monthly examinations.  Passing grade:  65%.

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVE: Graduates of this program will be able to use improved English language skills to perform present jobs more effectively, to obtain employment with previously learned skills that could not be utilized due to inadequate English language skills, or to obtain admission to academic or vocational education requiring improved English language skills.

REQUIRED COURSES:  total hours                                                                                 960*

501 English as a Second Language Level I

120

501 English as a Second Language Level II

120

501 English as a Second Language Level III

120

501 English as a Second Language Level IV

120

501 English as a Second Language Level V

120

501 English as a Second Language Level VI

120

502 Business English Communications

120

503 Advanced Reading and Writing

120

610 TOEFL Exam Preparation

80

ELECTIVE HOURS: * Students begin studies at the levels corresponding to their current language abilities as determined by an oral placement test and remain in the assigned level for the number of hours indicated unless the instructor recommends a higher level sooner.  Teacher recommendations are based on student attainment of the course terminal objectives in less than (or more than) the normal number of hours.  Students may complete less than (or more than) 960-hours of course work in 960 hours if teachers recommend advancement upon completion of terminal objectives prior to completion of the course hours.  Slower students must complete 65% of the course hour terminal objectives to maintain satisfactory academic progress.  Therefore, the number of hours spent in each course will vary according to course placement at registration and individual achievement of terminal course objectives.

TUITION:  $2880.      Diploma:  English as a Second Language/960

7020 Computerized Office Management (1600 hours)

DURATION OPTIONS:  All options are Monday to Friday inclusive.

16 months/5 hours daily (4 Terms)

20 months/4 hours daily (5 Terms)

26.6 months/3 hrs daily (6 Terms)

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVE: Office computer staff play an important role in managing the information flow essential to business.  Graduates should be prepared for entry-level positions as administrative assistants.

STANDARD: achieve course objective to standard described, with typing: 40 wpm.

REQUIRED COURSES:  total hours

822

201 Keyboarding: Basic Course                                                                                                                                              120

202 Keyboarding: Advanced Course                                                                                                                                              120

205 Machine Transcription                                                                                                        30

230 Computer Word Processing                                                                                                80

300 Business Management                                                                                                                                              120

301 Business Mathematics                                                                                                         24

401 Office Practice                                                                                                                                              160

402 Electronic Calculators                                                                                                         48

502 Business English                                                                                                                                               120

 

ELECTIVE COURSES:  total hours                                                                                                                                             778

200 Keyboarding for Information Processing                                                                              48

203 Keyboarding: Expert Course                                                                                                80

235 Introduction to Microsoft Word for Windows                                                                      80

240 Introduction to Word Perfect                                                                                               80

302 Accounting (First Course)                                                                                                                                       120

303 Accounting (Intermediate Course)                                                                                                                                       120

304 Accounting (Advanced I)                                                                                                     60

305 Accounting (Advanced II)                                                                                                   60

310 Import Export Procedures                                                                                                   80

404 Business Communications                                                                                                   72

501 English as a Second Language [any level(s), 120 hours EACH level)]                                                                                                                                       120

503 Advanced Reading and Writing                                                                                                                                       120

610 TOEFL Exam Preparation                                                                                                   80

620 College Success                                                                                                                  80

900 IBM Computer Graphics                                                                                                     80

925 Database Management                                                                                                         80

930 Introduction to DOS                                                                                                            80

935 Using Lotus 1-2-3                                                                                                                80

940 Introduction to Microsoft Windows                                                                                     80

945 Introduction to Microsoft Works                                                                                         80

950 Using Excel for Windows                                                                                                    80

955 Using the Internet                                                                                                                80

960 Using Microsoft Access                                                                                                      80

965 Using Microsoft PowerPoint                                                                                                80

970 Computerized Accounting Using Peachtree                                                                          80

975 Using Adobe PhotoShop                                                                                                     80

980 Using Microsoft FrontPage                                                                                                  80

985 Using Windows MovieMaker                                                                                               80

TUITION:  See List of Programs on page 52.     Certificate:  Computerized Office Management

8002 Accounting (1600 hours)

DURATION OPTIONS:  All options are hours daily from Monday through Friday inclusive.

16   months/5 hours daily (4 Terms)

20   months/4 hours daily (5 Terms)

26.6 months/3 hours daily (6 Terms)

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVE: Program concentrates on principles of accounting and application to business management.  Graduates should be prepared for entry-level jobs as computer accounting clerks.

STANDARDS:   Achieve each course objective to the standard described.

REQUIRED COURSES:  total hours                                                                                                                                             1040

200 Keyboarding for Information Processing                                                                                     48

201 Keyboarding: Basic Course                                                                                                                                                     120

202 Keyboarding: Advanced Course                                                                                                                                                     120

300 Business Management                                                                                                                                                     120

301 Business Mathematics                                                                                                                24

302 Accounting: First Course                                                                                                                                                     120

303 Accounting: Intermediate                                                                                                                                                     120

304 Accounting Advanced I                                                                                                             60

305 Accounting Advanced II                                                                                                            60

402 Electronic Calculators                                                                                                                48

502 Business English                                                                                                                                                      120

935 Using Lotus 1-2-3                                                                                                                      80

 

ELECTIVE COURSES: total hours                                                                                              560

230 Computer Word Processing                                                                                                       80

235 Introduction to Microsoft Word for Windows                                                                            80

240 Introduction to Word Perfect                                                                                                     80

310 Import Export Procedures                                                                                                          80

401 Office Practice                                                                                                                                                     160

404 Business Communication                                                                                                           72

501 ESL [any level(s)] (each level)                                                                                                                                                     120

503 Advanced Reading and Writing                                                                                                                                                     120

610 TOEFL Exam Preparation                                                                                                          80

620 College Success                                                                                                                        80

900 IBM Computer Graphics                                                                                                            80

925 Database Management                                                                                                                80

930 Introduction to DOS                                                                                                                  80

940 Introduction to Microsoft Windows                                                                                           80

945 Introduction to Microsoft Works                                                                                                80

950 Using Excel for Windows                                                                                                          80

955 Using the Internet                                                                                                                       80

960 Using Microsoft Access                                                                                                             80

965 Using Microsoft PowerPoint                                                                                                      80

970 Computerized Accounting Using Peachtree                                                                                 80

975 Using Adobe PhotoShop                                                                                                           80

980 Using Microsoft FrontPage                                                                                                        80

985 Using Windows MovieMaker                                                                                                     80

 

TUITION:  See List of Programs on page 52.       Diploma:  Accounting


8010 Computer-Assisted Accounting (1600 hours)

DURATION OPTIONS:  All options are daily Monday through Friday inclusive.

16 months / 5 hours (4 Terms)

20 months / 4 hours (5 Terms)

26.6 months / 3 hours (6 Terms)

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVE: This program concentrates on the principles of accounting and their use, through computer applications in today's businesses and industries. Graduates should be prepared for entry-level employment as computer accounting clerks.

STANDARDS: achieve course objectives to standards described, including typing: 25 wpm.

REQUIRED COURSES: total hours

912

201 Keyboarding: Basic Course                                                                                                                                              120

230 Computer Word Processing                                                                                                80

300 Business Management                                                                                                                                              120

301 Business Mathematics                                                                                                         24

302 Accounting (First Course)                                                                                                                                              120

303 Accounting (Intermediate Course)                                                                                                                                              120

401 Office Practice                                                                                                                                              160

402 Electronic Calculators                                                                                                         48

502 Business English                                                                                                                                               120

                  

ELECTIVE COURSES:  total hours

688

200 Keyboarding for Information Processing                                                                             48

202 Keyboarding: Advanced Course                                                                                                                                              120

203 Keyboarding: Expert Course                                                                                               80

204 Keyboarding: Professional Course                                                                                       80

205 Machine Transcription                                                                                                        30

230 Computer Word Processing                                                                                                80

235 Introduction to Microsoft Word for Windows                                                                     80

240 Introduction to Word Perfect                                                                                              80

304 Accounting (Advanced I)                                                                                                    60

305 Accounting (Advanced II)                                                                                                   60

310 Import Export Procedures                                                                                                  80

404 Business Communication                                                                                                    72

501 English as a Second Language [any level(s),  hours EACH level)]                                                                                                                                              120

503 Advanced Reading and Writing                                                                                                                                              120

604 High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation                                                                                                                                              120

610 TOEFL Exam Preparation                                                                                                   80

620 College Success                                                                                                                 80

900 IBM Computer Graphics                                                                                                    80

925 Database Management                                                                                                        80

930 Introduction to DOS                                                                                                           80

935 Using Lotus 1-2-3                                                                                                               80

940  Introduction to Microsoft Windows                                                                                   80

945  Introduction to Microsoft Works                                                                                       80

950 Using Excel for Windows                                                                                                   80

955 Using the Internet                                                                                                                80

960 Using Microsoft Access                                                                                                     80

965 Using Microsoft PowerPoint                                                                                               80

970 Computerized Accounting Using Peachtree                                                                          80

975 Using Adobe PhotoShop                                                                                                    80

980 Using Microsoft FrontPage                                                                                                 80

985 Using Windows MovieMaker                                                                                              80

TUITION:  See List of Programs on page 52.       Certificate: Computer-Assisted Accounting

Course of Study Requirements for F-1 Student Visa Applicants with ESL-Plus (1920 hours)

In order to pursue a full-time ESL-Plus course of study eligible for F-1 student visa application, students must:

Ø   attend four hours per day, five days per week

Ø   maintain satisfactory academic progress

Ø   have English language skills acquisition as their primary educational objective

Ø   consult with a Faculty Student-Services Associate to select an appropriate sequence of courses from among those ESL-only and ESL-plus courses listed in the following “Course Description” section.

 

* Students begin studies at the level corresponding to their current language abilities as determined by an oral placement test and remain in the assigned level for the number of hours indicated unless the instructor recommends a higher level sooner or later.  Teacher recommendations are based on student attainment of the course terminal objectives in less than (or more than) the normal number of hours.  Students may complete less than (or more  than) course hours of work in listed individual course hours if teachers recommend advancement upon completion of terminal objectives prior to (or after) completion of the individual course hours.  Slower students must complete 65% of the course hour terminal objectives to maintain satisfactory academic progress.  Therefore, the number of hours spent in each course will vary according to course placement at registration and individual achievement of terminal course objectives.

 

TUITION:  See List of Courses on page 53.       Certificate: See List of Courses on page 53.

 

200 Keyboarding For Information Processing (48 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, Keyboarding for Information Processing teaches basic keyboarding for information processing and computer applications. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to apply rules for English spelling and word formation;

·       to read and understand English letter combinations and words, word combinations, sentences, and passages;

·       to recognize and correct spelling, punctuation, and other English language errors; and

·       to key English text at least 10 wam with no more than 5 errors in a 5-minute timed writing.

TUITION:  $192          Certificate:  Keyboarding for Information Processing

201 Keyboarding (Basic Course) (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course builds keyboarding speed and accuracy skills through the production of personal/business correspondence in English. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       apply rules for English spelling and word formation;

·       read and understand English letter combinations and words, word combinations, sentences, and passages;

·       recognize and correct spelling, punctuation, and other English language errors; 

·       read and follow directions in English when practicing keyboarding exercises;

·       ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       identify and correct English language errors in producing documents;  

·       produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from hand-written and from printed text in English;

·       develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and

·       build basic speed and accuracy skills (to 25 wpm keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes).  

TUITION:  $480    Certificate:  Keyboarding (Basic Course)

202 Keyboarding (Advanced Course) (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Keyboarding 201 or equivalent.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course builds keyboarding skills through the production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft hand-written and print copy sources in English. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to better understand and correctly use English word division and composite words;

·       to read and follow directions in English when practicing advanced keyboarding exercises;

·       to ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation; .

·       to read and understand English language descriptions of business situations that will determine the production of documents;

·       to synthesize information from various English language sources that will determine the format of document production;   

·       to produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from hand-written and from printed text in English, identifying and correcting language errors;

·       to develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and

·       to build basic speed and accuracy skills (to 45 wpm, keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes). 

TUITION:  $480     Certificate:  Keyboarding (Advanced Course)

203 Keyboarding (Expert Course) (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Keyboarding 202 or equivalent.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course teaches expert keyboarding skills through comprehension and application of editing, of abstracting information, of making decisions, of setting priorities, of planning workflow, and of following directions. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read and follow directions in English when practicing advanced keyboarding exercises within  integrated business situations experiences requiring English language reading, discussion, and writing skills;

·       to ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation; .

·       to read and understand English language descriptions of complex business situations that will determine the production of documents;

·       to synthesize information from various English language sources that will determine the format of document production;   

·       to produce within situated experiences various kinds of letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from hand-written and from printed text in English, identifying and correcting language errors;

·       to develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and

·       to build basic speed and accuracy skills (to 45 wpm, keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes).   

TUITION:  $320     Certificate:  Keyboarding (Expert Course)

205 Machine Transcription (30 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Keyboarding 201 or equivalent.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course teaches students to listen, to understand, and to transcribe in English word/thought groups through simulated workplace tasks and materials. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       better understand and correctly use English word division and composite words;

·       understand and correctly use homonyms in the context of dictation;

·       correctly spell English words not spelled phonetically that typically cause difficulty;

·       understand spoken and written directions in English when transcribing from English dictation;

·       ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       read and understand English language descriptions of business situations that will determine the correct production of documents;

·       produce letters from English language dictation and to identify and correct language errors made by the transcriber and the person dictating;

·       transcribe 15 lines of English language letter copy in 10 minutes with fewer than 3 errors and to correct 15 50-space lines of copy containing errors in 10 minutes with no more than 1 mistake. 

TUITION:  $ 120    Certificate: Machine Transcription

230 Computer Word Processing  (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Typing 20 words per minute or enrollment in 200 Keyboarding for Information Processing or the equivalent. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course builds word processing speed and accuracy using Word through practice in the production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft copy sources in English. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read about word processing situations and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       read and discuss critical thinking text describing business situations requiring word processing solutions;

·       read and follow directions in English when practicing word processing exercises;

·       ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       learn how to formally proofread documents in English, to proofread them, and to make necessary corrections;

·       produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from copy in English, identifying and correcting language errors;

·       create and produce original documents; and

·       learn basic word processing using Word, including entering, formatting, creating tables, using styles and templates, mail merging, and using graphics

TUITION:  $320     Certificate:  Computer Word Processing

235 Introduction to MS Word for Windows (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course builds word processing speed and accuracy using Word through practice in the production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft copy sources in English. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read about word processing situations and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       read and discuss critical thinking text describing business situations requiring word processing solutions;

·       read and follow directions in English when practicing word processing exercises;

·       ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       learn how to formally proofread documents in English, to proofread them, and to make necessary corrections;

·       produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from copy in English, identifying and correcting language errors;

·       create and produce original documents; and

·       apply basic word processing using Word, including entering, formatting, creating tables, using styles and templates, mail merging, and using graphics

TUITION:  $320     Certificate: Introduction to Microsoft Word for Windows

240 Introduction to Word Perfect (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course builds word processing speed and accuracy through practice in the production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft copy sources in English. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read about word processing situations and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       read and discuss summary text describing business situations requiring word processing solutions;

·       read and follow directions in English when practicing word processing exercises;

·       ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       learn how to formally proofread documents in English, to proofread them, and to make necessary corrections; to produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from copy in English using Word Perfect, identifying and correcting language errors;

·       create and produce original documents in English; and

·       apply basic word processing using WordPerfect, including entering, formatting, creating tables, using styles and templates, mail merging, and using graphics. 

TUITION:  $320     Certificate: Introduction to Word Perfect

300 Business Management (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to small business management.  Through reading, discussion, and case study analysis, students develop an understanding of small business planning, of marketing and operational strategy development, of legal and financial issues, and of day-to-day supervision and control procedures. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read about small business management and better understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to interpret the text's English language adages and quotations as they apply to business situations;

·       to analyze and interpret graphs, charts, and other visual material;

·       to read, discuss, and write in English about cases illustrating typical small business situations or problems; and

·       to develop an individual small business plan in English.  

TUITION:  $480   Certificate:  Business Management

301 Business Mathematics (24 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course teaches elementary business math concepts and applications.

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read and better understand English language descriptions of situations requiring business mathematics activity or solutions;

·       to read, discuss, and understand directions in English for using arithmetic functions and skills;

·       to read, discuss, understand, and respond to English language basic business mathematics word problems;

·       to understand the basic vocabulary of payroll, checkbook procedures, marketing, inventory, depreciation, finance, and investment mathematics; and

·       to perform basic arithmetic operations with whole numbers, decimals, percents, and fractions. 

TUITION:  $96      Certificate:  Business Mathematics

302 Accounting (First Course) (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this first course in an accounting sequence introduces students to the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business;

·       to develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions;

·       to interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials;

·       to speak and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions;

·       to read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions;

·       to interpret orally and in writing how businesses communicate with financial statements; and

·       to apply accounting principles and procedures to analyzing and recording transactions, to accrual accounting and financial statement, to completing the accounting cycle, to accounting for merchandising activities, and to merchandise inventories and sales costs.

TUITION:   $480    Certificate:  Accounting (First Course)

303 Accounting (Intermediate Course) (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Accounting 302 or equivalent

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this second course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business;

·       to develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions;

·       to interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials;

·       to talk and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions;

·       to read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions;

·       to interpret how businesses communicate with financial statements

·       to understand the concept and forms of accounting information systems; and

·       to apply accounting principles and procedures to cash and internal control; to receivables and short-term investments; to plant assets, natural resources, and intangibles; to current liabilities; and to partnerships

TUITION:  $480     Certificate:  Accounting (Intermediate Course)

304 Accounting (Advanced I) (60 hours)

PREREQUISITE: Accounting 303 or equivalent

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this third course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business;

·       to develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions;

·       to interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials;

·       to talk and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions;

·       to read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions;

·       to interpret how businesses communicate with financial statements

·       to apply accounting principles and procedures to equity transactions and corporate accounting, term liabilities, long-term investments, reporting and analyzing cash flows, analysis of financial statements, and managerial accounting and job order cost accounting concepts and principles. 

TUITION:  $240      Certificate:  Accounting (Advanced I)

305 Accounting (Advanced II) (60 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Accounting 304 or equivalent

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this fourth course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.  

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business;

·       to develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions;

·       to interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials;

·       to talk and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions;

·       to read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions;

·       to explain orally and in writing how businesses communicate with financial statements; and

·       to apply accounting principles and procedures to process cost accounting, cost allocation and performance measurement, cost-volume-profit analysis, master budgets and planning, flexible budgets and standard costs, and capital budgeting. 

TUITION:  $240    Certificate:  Accounting (Advanced II)

310 Import-Export Management (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course provides an introduction to global markets, to the major trading nations and trading blocs, and to the processes and procedures that govern import and export management. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read about import-export management and better understand what is being discussed or described;

·       analyze and interpret graphs, charts, and other visuals; 

·       read, discuss, and write in English about cases illustrating typical import-export situations or problems; 

·       identify global markets, major trading nations, and trading blocs; and

·       discuss and write in English about basic processes and procedures that govern import and export management. 

TUITION:  $320  Certificate:  Import-Export Management

401 Office Practice (160 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Keyboarding 201 or equivalent.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to the issues and trends affecting the 21st Century office professional, including job searching, information processing, effective communication, records management, and team building. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read and better understand English language descriptions of issues and trends in the 21st Century office that will affect office professionals, including workplace diversity, the global marketplace, and technological advances;

·       read about office practices and procedures and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to interpret the text's charts, graphs, and other visual material;

·       read, discuss, and write in English about cases illustrating typical office practice issues or problems; and

·       develop resumes, application letters, and other aspects of office professional career development.

TUITION:   $640     Certificate:  Office Practice

402 Electronic Calculators (48 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to using the calculator to solve simulated business and workplace tasks.

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       better understand written directions in English;

·       demonstrate knowledge of common English language business terminology related to everyday business and consumer problems such as payrolls, purchase orders, invoices, cash and trade discounts, checking accounts, installment buying, finance charges, etc.;

·       ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       read and understand English language descriptions of business situations that will determine the correct production of calculator solutions;

·       learn how to convert to and from the metric system;

·       read, write, and show explanations about concepts; and

·       work at 119 spm

TUITION:  $ 192    Certificate:  Electronic Calculators

404 Business Communications (72 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course emphasizes the application of correct grammar and punctuation to letters, memos, reports, and other forms of personal and business communication.  

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       recognize and solve common sentence problems in English;

·       understand how context affects meaning and to correct grammar and other writing choices;

·       recognize and use correct English grammar in context with an emphasis upon grammar and usage issues for ESL writers;

·       understand and use correct punctuation, mechanics, and spelling in business writing; and

·       use English language skills to develop letters, memos, and other common forms of personal-business and business communication.  

TUITION:  $288   Certificate:  Business Communications

501 English As A Second Language I-VI (120 hours [each level])

501.1 ESL I

PREREQUISITE: none.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  A first level ESL course that introduces beginning students to basic vocabulary, spelling, grammar, conversation, pronunciation, and other ESL skills. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using the present and simple past tenses. 

501.2 ESL II (NorthStar: Introductory)

PREREQUISITE:  ESL I or High Beginners placement test score.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  A second level ESL course that continues to reinforce beginning student's vocabulary, spelling, grammar, conversation, pronunciation, and other ESL skills in present, past, and future tenses. 

OBJECTIVES:  By course end, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using the present, future, and past tenses. 

501.3 ESL III (NorthStar: Basic/Low Intermediate)

PREREQUISITE:  ESL II or Low Intermediate placement test score.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  A third level ESL course that introduces intermediate students to a higher level of difficulty and fluency than ESL II, requiring compound tenses and more extensive vocabulary.

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using compound tenses and more extensive vocabulary than expected of beginning ESL students. 

501.4 ESL IV (NorthStar: Intermediate)

PREREQUISITE: ESL III or Intermediate placement test score.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: A fourth level ESL course that introduces intermediate students to a higher level of difficulty and fluency than ESL III requiring compound tenses and more extensive vocabulary. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using compound tenses and more extensive vocabulary than expected of ESL III students. 

501.5 ESL V (NorthStar: High Intermediate)

PREREQUISITE:  ESL IV or High Intermediate placement test score.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  A fifth level ESL course that introduces advanced students to a higher level of fluency than previous ESL courses, including compound and complex sentence structures. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using compound and complex sentences and more extensive vocabulary than expected of ESL IV students. 

501.6 ESL VI (NorthStar: Advanced)

PREREQUISITE:  ESL V or Advanced placement test score.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: A sixth level ESL course that introduces advanced students to a higher level of fluency and more complex structures than previous courses. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to listen, speak, read, and write using longer complex sentences and more extensive vocabulary than expected of ESL V

TUITION:  $480 per 120 hours     Certificate:  English as a Second Language Level ___

502 Business English Communications (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  English 501, Level VI, or equivalent. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Business English teaches English language skills designed to help students communicate more successfully in a business environment.  The course emphasizes writing as a process of development that includes drafting, writing, editing, and reading for clear expression and correct language use. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students are expected:

·       to understand the process of writing;

·       to use different patterns of development;

·       to understand the difference between correct writing and effective writing;

·       to understand how context affects meaning, grammar, and other writing choices;

·       to recognize and solve common sentence problems in English;

·       to recognize and use correct English grammar in context with an emphasis upon grammar and usage issues for ESL writers;

·       to understand and use correct punctuation, mechanics, and spelling in business writing; and

·       to know how to write error-free, effective documents. 

TUITION:  $480   Certificate:  Business English Communications

503 Advanced Reading & Writing (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  English 501, Level VI, or equivalent. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Advanced Reading and Writing develops advanced English language skills through close examination of reading passages, through objective discussion of reading, and through paragraph and short essay writing.  The course develops personal and workplace advanced English reading, writing, and oral presentation skills at the multi-paragraph and document level. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to understand and implement the various stages of the writing process, including rough drafts and revision;

·       to understand the difference between correct writing and effective writing;

·       to understand how context affects meaning, grammar, and other writing choices;

·       to manipulate sentence, paragraph and essay structure in ways that achieve clarity, variety, and coherence;

·       to eliminate the most common types of errors;

·       to recognize and solve common sentence problems in English

·       to write examination essays responding clearly to the essay question; 

·       to write a multi-paragraph essay with a clearly identified thesis, development, and conclusion; and

·       to read in ways that reflect attention to the effective writing process.  

TUITION:  $480    Certificate:  Advanced Reading & Writing

604 High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation (120  hours)

PREREQUISITE: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  This course is designed to help students prepare for the language arts and subject areas GED Tests of the State of New York.  The course also introduces students to GED testing procedures, scoring information, and test taking hints. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students will have: 

·       studied GED's blend of power and time testing;

·       practiced pacing themselves in response to test questions;

·       practiced the skills levels tested by the language arts writing test, including the essay component; and 

·       reviewed and practiced the skills levels tested by the social studies, science, language arts (reading and literary), and mathematics tests

TUITION:  $480    Certificate:  High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation

610 TOEFL Exam Preparation (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE: English 501, Level VI, or equivalent.  

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  The course is designed to help prepare students for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). 

OBJECTIVES:  The course has three objectives: 

1.      To strengthen language skills covered by the TOEFL exam.  These skills include listening, reading, structure/written expression, and writing.

2.      To provide understanding of and experience with test-taking strategies specific to the TOEFL.

3.     To provide practice test taking related to the specific language skills tested by TOEFL.

TUITION:   $320   Certificate: TOEFL Examination Preparation

620 College Success (160 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  English 501, Level VI, or equivalent

COURSE DESCRIPTION: While developing English language skills, College Success is designed to inform students about American colleges and teach strategies that aid college success.  The course will be taught in a small class environment with lecture, discussion, small group work, and individual student presentations.  Course topics will include an overview of American higher education and an introduction to the college application process, to learning psychology, and to life and lifelong learning strategies that make for successful postsecondary learners. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students are expected:

·       to understand English language explanations of the American system of education communicated in oral or written forms;

·       to read, write, and speak about differences between the American system and those in their home countries;

·       to read American college catalogs and other postsecondary promotional material and demonstrate understanding of concepts and terminology;

·       to locate and understand information for international students on college web-sites or in college publications;

·       to understand and follow directions for correctly completing the application process;

·       to write an autobiographical or other personal essay in English in a format typically found on college applications;

·       to read, write, and talk about learning styles and other aspects of cognitive psychology affecting individual learning; and

·       to obtain valid and apply information from college web-sites, from automated library catalogs, and from electronic periodical databases and to communicate findings to others

TUITION:  $640   Certificate:  College Success

900 IBM Computer Graphics (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE: 235 Using MS Word, 955 Using the Internet, and 950 Using MS Excel or 960 Using MS Access or the equivalents

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to web page development concepts, features, functions, and applications using  Adobe PhotoShop.

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read about graphics software and Photoshop and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·       read documents and descriptions of situations and decide how to use Photoshop applications to design, develop, and customize image files;

·       ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       write simple explanations of procedures used or results obtained;

·       explain the design and content of Photoshop presentations;

·       understand the basics of creating Photoshop images from sources;

·       understand how Photoshop can be applied to real world situations;

·       understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Photoshop; and

·       understand how to use other Photoshop features.

TUITION:  $320      Certificate: Using IBM Computer Graphics

925 Database Management (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  This course teaches English in the context of an introduction to Microsoft Access. The course focuses on the English language skills needed by beginning Access users.  Students learn English when reading about and discussing databases, in general, and Access, in particular; when following directions to complete exercises;  and when asking questions and finding answers to Access related topics.  

OBJECTIVES:   By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read about Access and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to read and follow directions in English when practicing textbook exercises;

·       to read documents and descriptions of situations in English and decide how to use Excel spreadsheet applications to organize and present information;

·       to ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       to write simple explanations in English of procedures used or results obtained;

·       to practice speaking English when explaining the content of Access database elements

·       to understand the basics of creating an Access database;

·       to understand how Access can be applied to real world situations;

·       to understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Access; and

·       to understand how to use other Access features.

TUITION:  $320  Certificate: Database Management

930 Introduction to DOS (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to the DOS operating system and common DOS commands and tasks.  

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to understand the concept of computer architecture and of an operating system, in general, and the DOS operating system, in particular;

·       to read about DOS situations and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to ask questions concerning concepts and implementation

·       to read and follow directions when practicing DOS textbook exercises; and

·       to understand DOS commands, including those for file and directory management. 

TUITION:  $320    Certificate: Introduction to DOS

935 Using Lotus 1-2-3 (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to Lotus 1-2-3, including Lotus concepts, features, functions, and applications. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read about Lotus 1-2-3 situations and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to read and follow directions when practicing  textbook exercises;

·       to read about simple cases requiring a Lotus solution and to decide how to present useful information in spreadsheet or graph form that addresses the problem;

·       to ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       to explain orally and in writing procedures used or results obtained;

·       to explain to others the content of Lotus spreadsheets, charts, and graphs;

·       to understand the basics of creating a Lotus spreadsheet or graph;

·       to understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Lotus; and

·       to understand how Lotus 1-2-3 can be applied to problems in daily life, in different fields, and in real world situations. 

TUITION:  $320      Certificate: Using Lotus 1-2-3

940 Introduction to Microsoft Windows (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to Windows concepts, features, functions, and applications.

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read about Windows and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to read and follow directions when practicing  textbook exercises;

·       to ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       to explain orally or in writing procedures used or results obtained;

·       to understand the basics of the Windows operating system;

·       to understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Windows; and

·       to understand how to use Windows features.

TUITION:   $320     Certificate: Using Microsoft Windows

945 Introduction to MS Works (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to Microsoft Works concepts, features, functions, and applications.  

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read about Works and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to read and follow directions when practicing  textbook exercises;

·       to read descriptions of situations and decide how to use Works applications to replicate, organize, or otherwise present information;

·       to ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       to write simple explanations of procedures used or results obtained;

·       to explain the content of spreadsheet or database documents;

·       to understand the concept of universal features and its application to Works and other Microsoft programs;

·       to understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Works; and

·       to understand how to use other Works features.

TUITION:  $320      Certificate: Using Microsoft Works

950 Using Excel for Windows (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to spreadsheet concepts, features, functions, and applications using Excel. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read about spreadsheets, in general, and about Excel, in particualr, and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·       to decide how to use Excel to organize and present information for described situations;

·       to ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       to explain to others procedures used or results obtained;

·       to explain the information contained in Excel spreadsheets, charts, and graphs;

·       to understand the basics of creating a Excel spreadsheet or graph;

·       to understand how Excel can be applied to real world situations;

·       to understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Excel; and

·       to understand how to use other Excel features.

TUITION:   $320     Certificate:  Using Excel for Windows

955 Using the Internet (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to the structure of the Internet and provides direction and practice in using the Internet correctly to obtain valid information for personal, for business, and for academic use.   The course emphasizes good searching skills and includes practice in developing a personal web page. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read about Internet basics and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·       to ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       to explain procedures used or results obtained;

·       to understand the basics of Internet searching that produces valid information for personal, for business, and for academic use;

·       to understand how to create a personal web page; and

·       to understand how to use other World Wide Web features.

TUITION:  $320      Certificate: Using the Internet

960 Using Microsoft Access (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to Access concepts, features, functions, and database applications. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able:

·       to read about Access and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       to read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·       to decide how to use Access applications to organize and present information in response to specific situations;

·       to ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       to explain orally or in writing the procedures used or results obtained;

·       to explain the content of Access database elements

·       to understand the basics of creating an Access database;

·       to understand how Access can be applied to real world situations;

·       to understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Access; and

·       to understand how to use other Access features.

TUITION:  $320    Certificate: Using Microsoft Access

965 Using Microsoft PowerPoint (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to PowerPoint multi-media concepts, features, functions, and applications.

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read about multimedia presentation software and PowerPoint and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·       decide how to use PowerPoint applications to organize and present information in response to specific situations;

·       ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       explain procedures used or results obtained;

·       understand the basics of creating a PowerPoint presentation;

·       understand how PowerPoint can be applied to real world situations;

·       understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize PowerPoint; and

·       understand how to use other PowerPoint features.

TUITION:   $320     Certificate: Using Microsoft PowerPoint

970 Computerized Accounting Using Peachtree (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to computerized accounting concepts, features, functions, and applications using Peachtree. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read about computerized accounting and Peachtree and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       understand the differences between computerized and manual accounting;

·       read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·       decide how to use  Peachtree for accounting solutions in response to specific situations;

·       ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       explain Peachtree procedures used or results obtained;

·       explain Peachtree problems and solutions;

·       understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Peachtree; and

·       understand how to use other Peachtree features.

TUITION:  $320      Certificate: Computerized Accounting Using Peachtree

975 Using Adobe PhotoShop (160 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to computerized concepts, features, functions, and applications using PhotoShop. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·       read about graphics software and Photoshop and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·       read documents and situation descriptions and use Photoshop applications to design, develop, and customize images;

·       ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·       write simple explanations of procedures used or results obtained;

·       explain the design and content of Photoshop presentations;

·       understand the basics of creating Photoshop images from sources;

·       understand how Photoshop can be applied to real world situations;

·       understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Photoshop; and

·       understand how to use other Photoshop features.

TUITION: $640   Certificate: Using Adobe Photoshop

980 Using Microsoft FrontPage (160 hours)

PREREQUISITES:  235 Using Microsoft Word, 955 Using the Internet, and 950 Using Microsoft Excel or 960 Using Microsoft Access or the equivalents

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to web page development concepts, features, functions, and applications using FrontPage. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students should be able to :

·       read about web page creation and FrontPage and understand what is being discussed or described;

·       read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·       use FrontPage applications to create and publish web pages in response to specific situations;

·       ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·       explain procedures used or results obtained;

·       create and publish a basic FrontPage web from "scratch;"

·       understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize FrontPage; and

·       understand how to use other FrontPage features.

TUITION:  $640      Certificate: Using Microsoft FrontPage

985 Using Windows Movie Maker (80 hours)

PREREQUISITES:  none

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  While developing English language skills, this course introduces students to Windows Movie Maker.  While developing subject area-specific English language skills, students will learn how to create movies on the computer using a variety of media and to output their movies to a variety of source.

OBJECTIVES:     By the end of the course, students using subject area specific English vocabulary should be able to:

·        read about video editing software and Movie Maker and understand what is being discussed or described;

·        read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;

·        read documents and descriptions of situations and decide how to use Movie Maker applications to design, develop, and customize video compositions;

·        ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;

·        write simple explanations of procedures used or results obtained;

·        explain the design and content of Movie Maker presentations;

·        understand the basics of gathering video assets;

·       understand how to edit video assets by trimming and organizing them and by garnishing them with title tracks, special effects, and transitions;

·       understand how to use AutoMovie to create stand-alone movies; and

·       understand how to output their created videos to tape or disk, e-mail, or the Web. 

TUITION:  $320         Certificate:  Using Windows Movie Maker

 

1.    Admissions Requirements

The Institute welcomes applications from individuals seriously interested in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary for entry-level employment.  Applicants are accepted without regard to race, color, national origin, creed, sex, or physical handicaps.

Applicants for admission to programs must have a high school diploma or equivalency and be beyond the age of compulsory schooling.

Applicants for admission to individual courses need not be high school graduates.

2.    Admissions Procedures For Programs

The applicant must complete the Institute's "Application For Admission" and return it to the school.

An interview will be arranged.  The purpose of the interview is to explore the applicant's career goals and abilities as they relate to the Institute's programs and courses.

Arrangements will be jointly made by the applicant and the Institute to forward to the Institute the applicant's official high school transcript of grades.  The Institute provides a release form for this purpose.

Upon acceptance and in accordance with New York State Education Department Regulations, the applicant and Institute complete an "Enrollment Agreement."  The Agreement specifies all costs, payment methods, and programs of instruction.

Although a personal interview is required of all applicants, out-of-town or foreign students who register by mail and meet other requirements may schedule the interview upon their arrival in New York.  All interviews must be completed prior to the start of classes.

3.    Advanced Standing

Required courses may be waived for students who can demonstrate proficiency in the competencies taught in those courses, based on OBJECTIVE performance criteria.  Documentation of how students demonstrate proficiency in competencies is maintained in the student's file.

A student given advanced standing must complete the total approved hours for the program unless an amended enrollment agreement is signed for the remaining hours.

In TAP approved programs, students given advanced standing must be enrolled for a minimum of 1440 hours in total at a minimum rate of 24 hours per week.  Advanced standing does not imply "transfer hours" which are defined below.

4.    Transfer Of Hours

Students who request transfer of hours are required to present transcripts of previous studies for evaluation.  A transfer of hours may be granted for hours completed in an approved course or program from another licensed or registered school or a registered program at a degree granting institution or in recognized post-secondary institutions, at the discretion of the President or his designee, after an evaluation of the student's transcript.

A student given transfer of hours has only to complete the number of approved instructional hours for the program minus the number of transfer hours granted by the Institute.

The President or his designee reserves the right to test students before a final determination is made.  Tuition adjustments will be made as required.

5.    Student Visa Applications  (Form / I-20)

The Institute is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant foreign students.  A foreign student may register by mail or through a relative or friend in the United States.  The following is required:

·       Student's full name.

·       Month, day, and year of birth.

·       Complete address in the United States.

·       Complete, permanent address abroad.

·       Course or program of study (subjects and duration).

·       Name and address of responsible relative or friend in the United States.

·       A copy of the affidavit of support filed with the American Consulate.

·       Payment of the required tuition deposit.
(This amount is deducted from the total tuition for the course selected.)

·       A certificate or transcript from the last school attended.

The Institute will complete the form I-20 (Certificate of Eligibility) and send it to the student for presentation to the proper consular officials.  Upon providing this information, the student will receive two copies of the Enrollment Agreement for his/her signature.  One copy is returned to the Institute together with a transcript or certificate from the school last attended.  The material is placed in the student's file and becomes a permanent part of the student's record.  Transcripts and certificates are not returned.

6.    Financial Assistance

Pay-As-You-Learn Plan.  The Institute seeks to make its courses and programs of study affordable to the greatest number of students.  A Tuition Payment Plan makes it possible for students to "pay as they attend" without interest charges.

New York State Tuition Assistance Plan (TAP).  New York State-sponsored tuition benefits are available to qualified students in full-time programs.  The Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) provides grants to eligible New York State residents based on family income.  Complete information and applications are available at the Institute offices or through the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation, Albany, New York.

Other Agencies.  The Spanish-American Institute has also accepted students through the Office of Vocational Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID), WIN, Manpower, the Commission for the Visually Handicapped, TRA, and the Social Security Administration.

Federal Pell Grants.  Pell grants are awards to help students who qualify pay for their education.  These grants provide a foundation of financial aid, which may be added to aid from other Federal and non-Federal sources.  All United States citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply for grants for full or part-time attendance.  Unlike loans, grants do not have to be paid back. 

PELL Grants are paid to eligible students at the Institute twice per award year via credit to their tuition accounts and to book accounts with prior permission of the student.  Continued eligibility is contingent on maintaining satisfactory academic progress and on availability of federal funds.

Applications are available through the Institute's Financial Aid office, high school guidance offices, public libraries, or by writing directly to Federal Student Aid Programs, P.O. Box 7001, Mt. Vernon, IL 62864-0071. 

Federal Loans.  Federal loans are low-interest loans to help students pay for their education.  The Institute does not currently participate in the Federal Stafford Loan Program (formerly the Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL)) and Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) or Federal Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS) programs.  A loan is a serious responsibility.  All loans must be repaid.  Each student should borrow only the amount needed to meet educational expenses.  It is strongly advised that students do not take on financial obligations that they might not be able to meet.  Before taking out a loan, students should ask if they have taken advantage of all other federal and state aid programs for which they might qualify. 

Additional Information.  Additional information is available through the Institute's Financial Aid Office, in the Institute's Resource Centers, or by contacting the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation:  www.hesc.state.ny.us.

Students may seek assistance in obtaining financial aid information from members of the Institute's administration and staff in the Institute's student administrative offices.

Financial Aid Applications may be obtained through the financial aid office. 

Eligibility is determined based on an approved needs analysis system, which determines an amount the family can contribute towards the applicant's cost of attendance.  Aid amounts are approved based on the student's need.

The Institute receives aid funds directly.  The Institute credits tuition due and, if applicable, returns funds to the student for non-direct educational expenses. 

Average Cost of Attendance.  The following represents the average cost for a student to attend the Institute for one academic year.

 

EXPENSE ITEMS

Commuting from parents home No dependents

All others

Tuition & Fees

$5,450

$5,450

Books & Supplies

600

600

Room & Board

1,500

4,331

Personal Expenses

1,625

2,444

Transportation

546

546

TOTAL

$9,721

$13,371

7.    Tap Grant Waiver Criteria

Tap students may be granted a waiver of "good academic standing" standards. The waiver is not automatic.  The waiver is granted only by the President or his designee under the following conditions, if it is determined that there is a reasonable expectation that the student will meet future requirements, if said waiver is in the student's best interest, and if:

·       the waiver is discussed with the student and signed agreement obtained;  

·       the reason for student's failure to meet requirements is assessed & evaluated;

·       a complete written record of waiver, evaluation findings, and determination becomes a part of the student's record; and

·       only one waiver may be granted to a student who received a first award in 1981-1982 or after.

8.    Refund Policy

The Institute adheres to the refund policy on the Enrollment Agreement given to students at registration.  It reads as follows:

I. AFTER SIGNING THIS AGREEMENT BUT BEFORE STARTING CLASS THE SCHOOL KEEPS: the non-refundable registration fee of ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($100) per course or program.  (Registration fee is additional to tuition but is deducted from last payment.)

II.  AFTER STARTING CLASSES THE SCHOOL KEEPS:

A. The ONE HUNDRED DOLLAR ($100) registration fee per course or program PLUS
the stated cost of such textbooks, tools, materials, supplies, etc. as have been issued by the school and accepted by the student, PLUS: The school keeps tuition

1. FOR QUARTER ENROLLMENTS (all courses): If termination occurs week #

 

1st Quarter of 1st Enrollment

Quarter 1 or 2 * of subsequent enrollments

 

subsequent Quarters

week 1

  0%

0%

25%

week 2

 20%

25%

50%

week 3

 30%

50%

75%

week 4

 40%

75%

100%

week 5

 50%

100%

100%

week 6

 50%

100%

100%

week 7

 60%

100%

100%

week 8

100%

100%

100%

2. FOR First-Time Students in TERM ENROLLMENTS (all programs), The school keeps:

For withdrawal in:

Term 1

2nd Term

Subsequent Terms *

Week  #1

0% of the term tuition

*

20% of the term tuition

Week  #2

20% of the term tuition

*

35% of the term tuition

Week  #3

20% of the term tuition

*

50% of the term tuition

Week  #4

30% of the term tuition

*

70% of the term tuition

Week  #5

40% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #6

40% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #7

50% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #8

50% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #9

60% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week #10

100% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

3. FOR Non-First Time TERM ENROLLMENTS students (all programs), The school keeps:

For withdrawal in

Term 1

2nd Term

Subsequent Terms *

Week  #1

0% of the term tuition

*

20% of the term tuition

Week  #2

20% of the term tuition

*

35% of the term tuition

Week  #3

35% of the term tuition

*

50% of the term tuition

Week  #4

50% of the term tuition

*

70% of the term tuition

Week  #5

70% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #6

100% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

* If the student withdraws in the second term, the school must use the first term schedule unless the school demonstrates that no significant educational change occurred in the program as of the student's last date of attendance.  Significant Educational Change is defined as non-functioning equipment which adversely affects the student's program, material change in the student's schedule as agreed to at enrollment, substitution of teacher in a course after instruction begins if the teacher does not possess necessary language skills in approved language of instruction in order to effectively communicate subject matter to students, or significant increase in student-teacher ratio.

4. FOR ENROLLMENTS OF MORE THAN TWELVE MONTHS:
A student who cancels during the first twelve months is refunded all monies in advance for the second twelve months or part thereof.

5. FOR ENROLLMENTS UNDER THE TUITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (TAP): The total program tuition is divided by four.  Program length: 64 weeks. Term #1=16 weeks; #2=16 weeks; #3=16 weeks; #4=16 weeks.

B. ALL REFUNDS ARE MADE WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS.  Although not required, written notice of cancellation is recommended.  Refunds are computed as of the last date of recorded attendance.  Failure of a student to notify the President in writing of withdrawal may delay refund of tuition due pursuant to Section 5002 of the Education Law.

C. Diplomas, Certificates of Completion, and academic transcripts are not issued until the student meets all requirements and monetary obligations.

D. Students dismissed for improper conduct, poor attendance, failing progress, or tuition arrears are not relieved of financial obligations as specified in this Enrollment Agreement.

9.    Enrollment Agreement

Each student who registers at the Institute is given an enrollment agreement which indicates:  course of study, course length, tuition rate per class, total tuition required, payment plan (first payment and weekly payment), starting and ending dates of the course, and the refund policy. This enrollment agreement is signed by authorized personnel of the Institute and by the student.  One copy is made a permanent part of the student's file.  No promises other than those so specified in this agreement are binding.

10.Tuition

The tuition and fees are specified on the supplement enclosed with this catalog.

11.Financial Aid Refund Distribution Policy

If a student withdraws and according to the cancellation and refund policy a refund is due, the method of determining what portion of any refund is allocable to Title IV Federal Financial Aid Programs will be in accordance with the provisions or paragraphs of 668.22 of the Federal Regulations.  Distribution of any allocable refunds among Title IV Programs will be in the following order:  Stafford Loan, SLS, PLUS, PELL.

12.Financial Aid Repayment Distribution Policy

Students receiving cash disbursements to cover non-direct educational expenses will not receive payment until expenses have been incurred.

13.Student Loan Pro-Rata Refund Clause

Effective September 1991, all Stafford Loan Recipients whose withdrawal occurs during the first six months of enrollment are eligible for a pro-rata refund or the refund stated on their enrollment agreement, whichever results in a larger refund.

1.     Office Hours

The Institute's offices at 215 West 43 Street, Manhattan, second floor, are open for information, registration, and conferences from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Friday inclusive, except on school holidays.

2.    Student Program Card

Each student receives a program card on the first day of classes.  The program card indicates hours, subjects, and room assignments.  It must be presented to each teacher for admission to class.  Students should retain the program card at all times.

3.    Program Changes

Each student's program is the result of consultation at the time of registration.  Program changes can be made only after further discussion with administrative personnel and a complete understanding of the reason for the requested change and the effect the change will have on the student's scholastic and career goals.

4.    Attendance And Tardiness

Regular attendance is required for all classes.  Daily attendance is taken in all classes and all absence and tardiness is reported to the office.  No credit for attendance will be given for a class session in which a "class cut" occurs.

Absences.  When a student must be absent from classes, the student must:

·       telephone the office at (212) 840‑7111 to report the reason for absence and

·       provide the Institute with a written explanation for the absence upon returning to classes.

Tardiness.  Promptness in school is important preparation for the business world.  Students must report to classes on time.  Three class late arrivals s of more than five minutes are charged as one absence.  Faculty members may exclude students chronically arriving more that fifteen minutes late without good cause, should this condition result in disruption to the other students or the teacher.

Students arriving more that thirty minutes late do not receive credit for the class hour for TAP financial aid purposes.

Notification of Absence.  When a student is absent more than five times in a calendar month, a notice is sent to the student's home directing him/her to meet with school personnel and advising of possible loss of certificate/diploma eligibility, loss of financial aid, or loss of student visa status.

A student who is absent for more than 20% of the total course time and who has not maintained satisfactory grades or academic progress will be dismissed.  Students dismissed for any reason are not relieved of the monetary obligations stated in the Enrollment Agreement.

5.    Textbooks And Materials

Students may not attend classes without the required textbooks and materials.  Credit is not extended for the purchase of textbooks or materials in the Institute's Bookstore.

6.    "Fair Use" Duplication of Copyrighted Classroom Material Guidelines

The Spanish-American Institute requires faculty to observe the legal restrictions on duplication of copyrighted material in the United States Copyright Law.  The duplication of multiple copies of print and graphic material for classroom use is restricted by the Law's "fair use" guidelines. 

While the Law does not provide an exact measure of the amount of copyrighted material that a faculty member may duplicate without first seeking permission from or making payment to the author or publisher of the copyrighted material, it does provide guidelines restricting the nature and amount of material that may be duplicated and the amount that may be duplicated in any time period. 

The Spanish-American Institute strives to provide teachers and students with comprehensive copyrighted required textbook and workbook materials for all courses.  Faculty are encouraged to maximize the use of school textbooks and workbooks in their classes and to use additional material only when absolutely necessary.  In those instances, The Spanish-American Institute has adopted the following "fair use" requirements for multi-copying of copyrighted material, consistent with standards used at many other postsecondary institutions. 

Faculty members are required to observe the following school copyright policy, whether the material for classroom use is being duplicated by the Spanish-American Institute or by a source outside the school: 

1.      "Consumable works" such as workbook material may never be copied for classroom use.

2.      The same item shall not be duplicated over and over again.

3.      No more than 10% or 1,000 words, whichever is less, of a longer prose work may be duplicated for classroom use.

4.      For all other material, consult with the Dean of Academic Affairs before duplicating multiple copies.  

7.    Homework

Homework is assigned regularly and is an important part of the learning process.  All students are expected to complete assignments to the best of their ability and to present them in class on the due day.

8.    Make-Up Assignments / Tests

Students must satisfactorily complete an equal amount of make-up work for the time they are absent.  Students who require more than eight days beyond the scheduled course completion date may be charged at the hourly rate for the additional time.  A student who misses 20% of the total course time and who has not maintained satisfactory grades or academic progress will be dismissed.

Make-up Examinations.  When a student does not take an examination for valid reasons, a make-up examination is required within ten days of the student's return to classes.  The instructor schedules such make-up examinations.

Incomplete Status.  A student who has received an "INC" for whatever reason must rectify this deficiency within ten days or receive a failing grade for the subject in which an incomplete was given.

9.    Dress Code

The Institute does not have a uniform or standard dress requirement.  Students may dress in casual, comfortable attire; they are expected to be neat and presentable at all times.  Their manner and dress should reflect credit on themselves and on the Institute.

10.Leave Of Absence

A student who requires a leave of absence must submit the request in writing to the office.  If the leave is granted, the student will be permitted to suspend his/her course of study for a period not to exceed three months.  The student may then resume without loss of time or tuition paid.

Students receiving Title IV federal financial aid may receive no more than one leave of absence per twelve (12) month period which may not exceed sixty (60) days in duration except in the case of students who provide the Institute with a written recommendation from a physician for a leave of absence of more than sixty days based on a medical condition. 

When a student returns from an approved leave of absence, the student shall be placed in the instructional program at the point commensurate with the skill level retained by the student at the time of his or her return.  For leaves of less than 30 calendar days, there will be a counseling session to determine the student’s retention level.  For leaves in excess of thirty days, in addition to the counseling session, faculty members will assess the student’s retention level and provide instruction accordingly.

Loan recipients requesting a leave of absence are subject to a sixty (60) day maximum leave.  An extended leave may be granted under special medical circumstances.

11.Grading Scale

Student grades are assigned as follows:

Table 1 Grading Scale

LETTER GRADE

POINTS

GRADE RANGE

MEANING

A

4.0

90-100%

honors

  B+

3.5

85-89%

excellent

B

3.0

80-84%

above average

  C+

2.5

75-79%

average

C

2.0

70-74%

satisfactory

D

1.5

65-69%

passing

F

0.

60-64%

failing

W

-

 

withdrawal

I

0.

 

incomplete

N

-

 

new student

  Ab

0

 

Exam Absence

12.Maintaining Satisfactory Progress

Academic Progress.  In order to maintain good academic standing, a student must achieve a grade of at least 65% and attain a cumulative average of not less than 70% (Grade Point Average: 2.0).  There are six grade reporting periods in each calendar year.   The Institute assesses satisfactory progress for students at the:

·       end of each student's academic year,

·       quarter point of the regular time frame,

·       halfway point of the regular time frame,

·       quarter point of the established maximum time frame of the program,

·       halfway point of the established maximum time frame of the program, and

·       three-quarter point of the established maximum time frame of the program.

Students not maintaining satisfactory academic progress at the regular halfway point will be placed on probation until the halfway point of the maximum time frame.

The maximum time frame in which a student must complete his/her educational objective is 1.5 times the standard program length for normally progressing students of the same enrollment status.  At the halfway point of the maximum time frame of a program, the student must have successfully completed at least 60% of the clock hours attempted toward the educational objective.  The minimum grade-point average at the halfway point of the maximum length must be 1.5. 

At the 75% point of the maximum permitted length, the student must have completed 65% of the clock hours attempted toward the educational objective and the grade point average must be 1.75. 

A student on academic probation is considered to be making satisfactory progress during the probationary period.  At graduation the minimum grade point average must be 2.0.  Evaluations are conducted at least once every academic year at the 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% point of the maximum program length.  Please see Table 2 Satisfactory Progress on page 49 below.

Incomplete Status.  A student who has received an "INC" (incomplete) for whatever reason must rectify his/her deficiency within ten (10) days or be considered failing in his/her grade for the course in which an incomplete "INC" was given.

Withdrawals.  A student who withdraws from a course prior to completing the course requirements earns a grade of "W" and zero points for that course.  A student who withdraws from or repeats a course for whatever reason, must complete the program with the required number of courses within the time frame allowed.  A failing grade will not be included in the student’s grade point average if the student repeats and passes the course.  Only the passing grade will be calculated in the average.  In order to maintain financial aid eligibility, a student must:

·       be enrolled in a program of study

·       be attending a minimum of twelve hours per week

·       maintain satisfactory progress as stated in this catalog

Repeated Courses Grades.  Grades earned for courses repeated due to failure to obtain a passing grade replace the failing grade in computations of satisfactory academic progress except with respect to the computation of the maximum time frame permitted to complete the program.

Pass/Fail Grades. The Institute does not use pass/fail grades.  See Grading Scale on page 47 for a explanation of the Institute's grading scale.

Non-Credit, Remedial Coursework.   Non-credit remedial classes are not available.  Students requiring extra help or tutoring should contact the Dean of Students for assistance.  Hours beyond the normal program elective and required hours and are not included in the computation of satisfactory academic progress.

Extended Enrollment Status.  A student determined to not be making satisfactory progress at the evaluation points described above may be continued in extended enrollment status at the discretion of the Dean of Students for an unlimited period of time, provided that the student and Dean discuss and agree in writing to the following:

·       the student is not eligible for additional student aid while in extended enrollment status;

·       the student is responsible for all financial arrangements with the school;

·       the student is not enrolled in an eligible program for the purpose of student aid eligibility; and

·       the school may charge the student for tuition and fees during extended enrollment, but is not required to do so.

While in extended enrollment status,

·       students must seek to correct any academic deficiencies by taking additional course hours, retaking courses they have failed and upgrading their skills;

·       students who exceed one and half times the normal course length in extended enrollment status do not receive the original academic credential for which they enrolled but may receive a certificate of completion; and

·       the Institute will calculate refunds from the last day of attendance, not including extended enrollment.

Re-establishing Satisfactory Academic Progress.  A student may reestablish satisfactory progress after failing to maintain the minimum standards if:

1)     the student successfully retakes previously failed courses or upgrades the skills applicable to the student's educational objective so that the recalculated GPA and successful completion percentage meet or exceed the minimum requirements;

2)     the student is evaluated by interview with the Dean of Students or his designee to determine that the student has the desire and academic ability to progress satisfactorily in the program; and

3)     after reestablishing satisfactory progress, the student is placed on academic probation until the next evaluation point. 

13.Grade Reporting Procedures

Students are tested regularly and must achieve a satisfactory grade in order to maintain good standing.  Examinations are given bi-monthly to measure student progress.  All grades are entered on official grade sheets by the teacher and submitted to the office for entry on individual student records.  A Progress Report (report card) is given to each student after each bi-monthly examination period.  Final grades for each course in a program are calculated by taking a straight average of each of the weekly grades recorded by instructors on the weekly attendance rosters.  Course final grades are weighted by course hours when calculating grade point averages for programs.

14.Academic Warning and Probation

Students who receive a cumulative average below 70% (Grade Point Average of 2.0) will be placed on academic warning for eight weeks and are expected to improve their grades in the next examination period.  Such students will be extended guidance, extra classes, and homework in an effort to improve upon their performance. 

To remain eligible for continued New York State (TAP) financial assistance, students must continually maintain a cumulative minimum average of 70%.  Failure to do so may result in a loss of State financial assistance until a 70% average is achieved.

Academic Warning / Probation Appeal Procedure.  Students may provide information about mitigating or special circumstances relating to academic probation within three weeks of being placed on academic probation.  The Academic Warning and Probation Appeals Committee consisting of the Institute's President and Deans will evaluate this information.  A determination will be made within ten (10) days of receipt of the student's written appeal.

15.Evaluation Points in the Academic Program

Evaluations are conducted at least once every academic year and at the 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% point of the maximum program length. 

Table 2 Satisfactory Progress

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS TABLE

Required Evaluation Point

Minimum GPA

Minimum % Successful Completion of Courses Attempted

**

25% of maximum program length

1.25

55%

*

 50% of maximum program length

1.50

60%

*

 75% of maximum program length

1.75

65%

*

100% of maximum program length

2.00

N/A

 

 

 

 

**

End of First Academic Year

1.25

55%

**

End of Second Academic Year

2.00

60%

*

Students not meeting standards will be dismissed; probation is not allowed at this point

**

Students not meeting these standards are considered for probation

This table should be used together with the minimum successful completion standards, starting with item Maintaining Satisfactory Progress on page 47.

Table 3  Maximum Program Length Table

MAXIMUM PROGRAM LENGTH TABLE

Normal Program Length

Maximum Program Length

25% of Maximum Program Length

50% of Maximum Program Length

75% of Maximum Program Length

720 hours

1080 hours

270 hours

540 hours

810 hours

960 hours

1440 hours

360 hours

720 hours

1080 hours

1600 hours

2400 hours

600 hours

1200 hours

1800 hours

16.Program Graduation Requirements

To meet the Institute's program graduation requirements for the programs listed below, the student must:

1.      pass all courses in the Program of Instruction with a grade of 65% or higher,

2.      have a cumulative average of at least 70% (Grade Point Average: 2.0),

3.      have the listed Keyboarding skills, and

4.      have met all financial obligations to the Institute. 

Table 4 Program Graduation Requirements Table



PROGRAM TITLE

Typing

7020 Computerized Office Management

40 wpm

8001 Basic Accounting

25 wpm

8002 Accounting.

40 wpm

8010 Computer-Assisted Accounting

25 wpm

17.Course Certificates of Completion

To meet the Institute's graduation requirements for a Certificate of Completion in a course, the student must:

·       have a minimum passing grade of 65% for the course,

·       meet the skills requirement of the course, and

·        have met all financial obligations to the Institute.

18.Academic Year

Since the Institute employs the continuous enrollment method, there are no specific "registration dates."  New students are admitted to classes on the second Monday of each month.  There are, therefore, 12 start dates a year.  All programs are designed so that students are able to progress systematically through each lesson.  Students are tested regularly.  Students must pass required tests in order to maintain good academic standing.

19.Academic Calendar

The Institute is open year-round except for the following holidays.  The holidays listed below correspond to those observed by New York State and Federal offices.

      Martin Luther King Day

      Labor Day

      Presidents' Day

      Columbus Day

      Good Friday

      Veteran's Day

      Memorial Day

      Thanksgiving (2 days)

      Independence Day

      Christmas Vacation

 

 


20.Class Hour Schedule

9:15 a.m.

to

10:05 a.m.

10:10  a.m.

to

11:00 a.m.

11:05 a.m.

to

11:55 a.m.

12:00 noon

to

12:50 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

to

1:50 p.m.

1:55 p.m.

to

2:45 p.m.

2:50 p.m.

to

3:40 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

to

4:50 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

to

5:50 p.m.

5:51 p.m.

to

6:41 p.m.

6:42 p.m.

to

7:32 p.m.

7:33 p.m.

to

8:23 p.m.

8:24 p.m.

to

9:14 p.m.

21.Instructional Hour

The Institute measures course work in units called instructional hours. An instructional hour equals fifty (50) minutes of classroom instruction.


22.List of Programs

Program Number

Diploma Programs

Hours

Tuition *

Page

5480

English as a Second Language/480

480                                                                                                   

   $1440

17

5960

English as a Second Language/960

960

   $2880

18

8002

Accounting

1600

   $9600 **

20

 

Certificate Programs

 

 

 

7020

Computerized Office Management

1600

   $9600 **

18

8010

Computer Assisted Accounting

1600

   $9600 **

21

 

 * Non-refundable Registration Fee(s), books and materials are additional.

** Tuition is $2400 per term, calculated as follows:  

Full-Time tuition, 5 hours daily, 16 months, is 4 terms times $2400 (i.e. $ 9,600)

Part-Time tuition, 4 hours daily, 20 months, is 5 terms times $2400 (i.e. $12,000)

Part-Time tuition, 3 hours daily, 27 months, is 6 terms times $2400 (i.e. $14,400)

 

Prospective students and faculty may obtain course syllabi directly from the Institute's web site at:  www.sai2000.org.  Students without Internet access may request print copies from the Institute's administrative staff. 

23.Course of Study Requirements for F-1 ESL-Plus Student Visa Applicants

 

 

Number

 

 

Course Titles

 

 

Hours

Sessions
(all sessions are
4 classes daily
5 days weekly)

 

Tuition per Session

 

 

Page

Special Note:  any combination of 3, 6, 9 or 12 month sessions totaling 24 months is permitted

Varies with collaborative course selection

Individual educationally appropriate selection from Course List below

1920

2 sessions of
12 months each

$2880 per session

22

4 sessions of
6 months each

$1440 per session

8 sessions of
3 months each

$840 per session


24.List of Courses

Number

Course Titles

Hours

Tuition

Page

200

Keyboarding for Information Processing

48

192

23

201

Keyboarding (Basic Course)

120

480

23

202

Keyboarding (Advanced Course)

120

480

24

203

Keyboarding (Expert Course)

80

320

24

205

Machine Transcription

30

120

25

230

Computer Word Processing

80

320

 

235

Introduction to Microsoft Word for Windows

80

320

26

240

Introduction to Word Perfect

80

320

26

300

Business Management

120

480

27

301

Business Mathematics

24

96

27

302

Accounting (First Course)

120

480

27

303

Accounting (Intermediate Course)

120

480

28

304

Accounting (Advanced I)

60

240

28

305

Accounting (Advanced II)

60

240

29

310

Import – Export Management

80

320

29

401

Office Practice

160

640

29

402

Electronic Calculators

48

192

29

404

Business Communication

72

288

30

501

English As A Second Language (Levels I-VI each)

120

480

31

502

Business English

120

480

32

503

Advanced Reading And Writing

120

480

32

604

High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation

120

480

33

610

TOEFL Exam Preparation

80

320

33

620

College Success

160

640

33

900

IBM Computer Graphics

80

320

34

925

Database Management

80

320

34

930

Introduction to DOS

80

320

34

935

Using Lotus 1-2-3

80

320

35

940

Introduction to Microsoft Windows

80

320

35

945

Introduction to Microsoft Works

80